Discussion:
Tesla Remotely Extends Range of Cars in FL for Free
(too old to reply)
BTR1701
2017-09-12 19:26:10 UTC
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In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.

The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.

In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)

But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh points out:

@elizabeth_joh:

This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.

And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
updates goes wrong in disastrous ways:

@pwnallthethings

"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."

So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
anim8rfsk
2017-09-12 19:54:01 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.
In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
@pwnallthethings
"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."
So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended
-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-12 20:43:12 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.
In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
@pwnallthethings
"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."
So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended
-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
One would hope...but then the Tesla's bought at the premium price would
lose some resale value so...

Meanwhile, I'm pretty sure that every car with OnStar or Sync can
probably brick your car as needed.

Meanwhile, the latest Nissan Leaf electric car has decided to combine
the gas pedal and the brake pedal into a single unit. Hopefully they
still offer cruise control so your foot doesn't wear out on those long
drives to suzeeq land...and hopefully they keep an emergency brake pedal
(or at least a mechanically connected emergency brake) in future
models just in case.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 02:11:03 UTC
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Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.
In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
@pwnallthethings
"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."
So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-exten
ded
-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
One would hope...but then the Tesla's bought at the premium price would
lose some resale value so...
Meanwhile, I'm pretty sure that every car with OnStar or Sync can
probably brick your car as needed.
Meanwhile, the latest Nissan Leaf electric car has decided to combine
the gas pedal and the brake pedal into a single unit. Hopefully they
still offer cruise control so your foot doesn't wear out on those long
drives to suzeeq land...and hopefully they keep an emergency brake pedal
(or at least a mechanically connected emergency brake) in future
models just in case.
http://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/12665/2018-nissan-leafs-e-pedal-to-ena
ble-one-pedal-driving

This sounds like a lousy idea. Plus, if you have to engage it by
hitting a switch on the center console, what the Hell does it do when
the switch is *not* engaged?

Basically it seems like it's the same as people that drive with both
feet, one on each pedal all the time ...
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-13 02:43:43 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.
In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
@pwnallthethings
"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."
So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-exten
ded
-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
One would hope...but then the Tesla's bought at the premium price would
lose some resale value so...
Meanwhile, I'm pretty sure that every car with OnStar or Sync can
probably brick your car as needed.
Meanwhile, the latest Nissan Leaf electric car has decided to combine
the gas pedal and the brake pedal into a single unit. Hopefully they
still offer cruise control so your foot doesn't wear out on those long
drives to suzeeq land...and hopefully they keep an emergency brake pedal
(or at least a mechanically connected emergency brake) in future
models just in case.
http://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/12665/2018-nissan-leafs-e-pedal-to-ena
ble-one-pedal-driving
This sounds like a lousy idea. Plus, if you have to engage it by
hitting a switch on the center console, what the Hell does it do when
the switch is *not* engaged?
I'm guessing that the 'hard brake pedal' will then operate normally as a
brake and the 'gas' pedal will operate normally to provide the power.
In the end, this will be one of those gimmick addons to cars just like
the 'manual shifting' ability on all the new cars with automatic
transmissions and no clutch.
Post by anim8rfsk
Basically it seems like it's the same as people that drive with both
feet, one on each pedal all the time ...
...which begs the question...at what point in the Leaf's pedal throw
does it decide to engage the brake lights?
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 03:17:10 UTC
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Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles, to make it
easier for them to evacuate the state. Now, as an initial response, this
may seem praiseworthy. The company did something (at no cost to car-owners)
to help them evacuate from a serious danger zone. In a complete vacuum,
that sounds like a good idea. But there are a variety of problems with it
when put back into context.
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent. That is, it uses the same batteries in
different cars -- it just limits how much they'll charge via software.
Thus, spend more on a "nicer" model and more of the battery is used. So all
that happened here was that Tesla "upgraded" these cars with an
over-the-air update. In some ways, this feels kind of neat -- it means that
a Tesla owner could "purchase" an upgrade to extend the range of the car.
But it should also be somewhat unsettling.
In some areas, this has lead to discussions about the possibility of
hacking the software on the cheaper version to unlock the greater battery
power -- and I, for one, can't wait to see the CFAA lawsuit that eventually
comes out of that should it ever happen. (Some people are already hacking
into the Tesla's battery management system, but just to determine how much
capacity is really available.)
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
And, of course, there's the possibility that one of these over-the-air
@pwnallthethings
"Oops! Sorry we accidentally bricked all
the Teslas in the vicinity of the hurricane.
Please accept our condolences and a
year of free credit monitoring."
So, yes, without any context, merely upgrading the cars' range sure sounds
like a good thing. But when you begin to think about it in the context of
who actually owns the car you bought, it gets a lot scarier.
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-ext
en
ded
-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
One would hope...but then the Tesla's bought at the premium price would
lose some resale value so...
Meanwhile, I'm pretty sure that every car with OnStar or Sync can
probably brick your car as needed.
Meanwhile, the latest Nissan Leaf electric car has decided to combine
the gas pedal and the brake pedal into a single unit. Hopefully they
still offer cruise control so your foot doesn't wear out on those long
drives to suzeeq land...and hopefully they keep an emergency brake pedal
(or at least a mechanically connected emergency brake) in future
models just in case.
http://www.thedrive.com/sheetmetal/12665/2018-nissan-leafs-e-pedal-to-ena
ble-one-pedal-driving
This sounds like a lousy idea. Plus, if you have to engage it by
hitting a switch on the center console, what the Hell does it do when
the switch is *not* engaged?
I'm guessing that the 'hard brake pedal' will then operate normally as a
brake and the 'gas' pedal will operate normally to provide the power.
In the end, this will be one of those gimmick addons to cars just like
the 'manual shifting' ability on all the new cars with automatic
transmissions and no clutch.
Post by anim8rfsk
Basically it seems like it's the same as people that drive with both
feet, one on each pedal all the time ...
...which begs the question...at what point in the Leaf's pedal throw
does it decide to engage the brake lights?
Yeah. Even if this were a good idea, it's not a good fit for the
current system.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Jim G.
2017-09-12 21:07:15 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
Yes. I saw the figure of $9K mentioned for that just the other day.
--
Jim G. | A fan of the good and the bad, but not the mediocre
"I intend to save her beautiful, stubborn ass. And if you keep being
weird about this, I intend to poke you in the lung hole." -- D'avin
Jaqobis, KILLJOYS
anim8rfsk
2017-09-12 21:52:56 UTC
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Post by Jim G.
Post by anim8rfsk
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
Yes. I saw the figure of $9K mentioned for that just the other day.
Coo, thanks.
--
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https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
j***@hotmail.com
2017-09-13 01:51:42 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
That's weird. Can you buy the longer range after market?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
This would be usefull for Roker and Holt covering Irma on NBC. They started in Miami on Friday, Fort Meyer on Saturday and Tampa on Sunday, out of the way of Irma. By Monday I expected to see them in Cleveland.
Dimensional Traveler
2017-09-13 20:08:27 UTC
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I just have to say that when I first read the subject line, I wondered
how someone brought Nicholas Tesla back to life. Did they use
electricity like Frankenstein's Monster? :D
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
suzeeq
2017-09-13 20:25:45 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
I just have to say that when I first read the subject line, I wondered
how someone brought Nicholas Tesla back to life. Did they use
electricity like Frankenstein's Monster? :D
Of course!
BTR1701
2017-09-13 21:12:19 UTC
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Post by Dimensional Traveler
I just have to say that when I first read the subject line, I wondered
how someone brought Nicholas Tesla back to life. Did they use
electricity like Frankenstein's Monster? :D
I would have thought, if anybody, you'd have mistaken it for Nikola Tesla.
Is Nicholas any relation?
suzeeq
2017-09-13 22:30:44 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by Dimensional Traveler
I just have to say that when I first read the subject line, I wondered
how someone brought Nicholas Tesla back to life. Did they use
electricity like Frankenstein's Monster? :D
I would have thought, if anybody, you'd have mistaken it for Nikola Tesla.
Is Nicholas any relation?
Just the English version.
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-12 20:09:25 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
In the lead up to Hurricane Irma hitting Florida over the weekend, Tesla
did something kind of interesting: it gave a "free" upgrade to a bunch of
Tesla drivers in Florida, extending the range of those vehicles
The first thing you need to understand is that while Tesla sells different
versions of its Model S, with different ranges, the range is actually
entirely software-dependent.
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought.
Amazon Erases Orwell Books From Kindle
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/18/technology/companies/18amazon.html?mcubz=3




----------------


J.B. Nicholson
2017-09-12 22:14:08 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Amazon Erases Orwell Books From Kindle
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/18/technology/companies/18amazon.html
Hence the need for free software -- software users are free to run,
share, inspect, and modify -- device owners deserve full control over
their devices, and respecting a computer user's software freedom is
the ethical way to treat other people where computer software is
concerned.

There's nothing wrong with electronic books per se, it's the
proprietary software (which controls their use) as well as the DRM
(digital restrictions management) in the eBook that are the
problems. There are eBooks one can read, print, excerpt, share, and
archive fully using only free software.

Check out https://www.gnu.org/proprietary/ for pointers to all kinds
of malware organized by type of malware and company.

This is also the reason for efforts like:

https://www.powerpc-notebook.org/en/
https://www.raptorcs.com/TALOSII/

Modern Intel and AMD-based computers have backdoors in them (Intel's
is called "Management Engine"). They're promoted as sysadmin
conveniences but they're really small computers with network, video,
sound, storage, and bus access to the main computer. In other words,
these smaller computers can vet the main computer's network data,
monitor the screen(s), send a copy of computer audio somewhere or
listen in on the mic, monitor mouse movements, and log
keystrokes. This secondary computer runs cryptographically-signed
software and the computer's owner is never given the private key (so
the owner can't inspect what that ME or ME-like computer does, or make
it do what the owner wants outside of whatever controls the proprietor
allows. The PowerPC notebook and Talos computers don't have this; any
firmware they offer is available to the user and licensed as free
software. The Talos computers are more expensive because they're made
by smaller manufacturers. I don't know how much the PowerPC notebook
will cost.

Visit https://www.fsf.org/ryf for the Free Software Foundation's
"Respects Your Freedom" campaign with pointers to computers available
now that respect your software freedom.

How is this relevant for a TV newsgroup? A lot of TVs are computers
these days, and a lot of TVs have cameras and mics in them (like
laptop computers). Thus the same advice applies: Consider that if your
computer runs nonfree software, it could be monitoring you and sending
that audiovisual data somewhere. I doubt most people who buy so-called
"smart" TV intended to be watched anytime a proprietor feels like
turning on that camera and/or mic.

One should run a free software OS with only free software running on
top of it.
J.B. Nicholson
2017-09-12 22:25:04 UTC
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Post by J.B. Nicholson
https://www.powerpc-notebook.org/en/
https://www.raptorcs.com/TALOSII/
Visit https://www.fsf.org/ryf for the Free Software Foundation's
"Respects Your Freedom" campaign with pointers to computers available
now that respect your software freedom.
I should have also linked to

https://www.fsf.org/blogs/licensing/support-the-talos-ii-a-candidate-for-respects-your-freedom-certification-by-pre-ordering-by-september-15

which also discusses the merits of the Talos II campaign.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-12 20:20:21 UTC
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. . . But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police. . . .
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.

The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-12 20:27:46 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police. . . .
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Michael Hastings, 'Rolling Stone' Contributor, Dead at 33
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/michael-hastings-rolling-stone-contributor-dead-at-33-20130618
Ed Stasiak
2017-09-12 23:15:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Adam H. Kerman
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The non-mechanical paddle shifter on his Jeep Cherokee seems to be
what killed Chekov v2.0.
BTR1701
2017-09-13 01:10:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
FPP
2017-09-13 02:37:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Why? What could go wrong?

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/9/12/16297444/statement-joshua-brown-killed-semi-autonomous-tesla
Post by BTR1701
Early reports of the crash blamed Brown for keeping his hands off the wheel despite multiple visual and audio warnings by the car not to do so. The Brown family disputes this claim as well as claims that Joshua was driving over 100 mph and simultaneously watching a Harry Potter film.
Well, at least maybe he'll get a refund for the movie...
--
So... Trumpcare dead, defeated. Flynn resigns, shamed. (Kellyanne)
ConJob marginalized. Giuliani, Christie vanish. This Milo (Yiannopoulos)
kid loses book, job. CPAC expels (Richard) Spencer. WHO's winning?
-Keith Olbermann
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-13 02:49:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
CAR HACKING REPORT REFUELS CONCERNS ABOUT MICHAEL HASTINGS CRASH
https://whowhatwhy.org/2015/02/20/car-hacking-report-refuels-concerns-michael-hastings-crash/




---------------


Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-13 03:11:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
suzeeq
2017-09-13 03:37:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
A Friend
2017-09-13 03:48:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
BTR1701
2017-09-13 04:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
+1
suzeeq
2017-09-13 05:14:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-13 05:23:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Download the google map app, be sure to download the offline data, and you will never need a paper map again. Offline maps don't need cellular or wifi to use.

If you don't have a phone, I am selling (here comes shameless capitalist sales plug) android tablets on Craigslist in excellent condition for between 25 and 44 dollars.

Susie, just get an android phone and throw away the paper maps, LOL
FPP
2017-09-13 05:27:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits or GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very
much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Run out of papyrus?
--
So... Trumpcare dead, defeated. Flynn resigns, shamed. (Kellyanne)
ConJob marginalized. Giuliani, Christie vanish. This Milo (Yiannopoulos)
kid loses book, job. CPAC expels (Richard) Spencer. WHO's winning?
-Keith Olbermann
trotsky
2017-09-13 10:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by FPP
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
   This sounds great until you realize the
   power to brick a car is useful to corporations
   and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits or GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very
much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either.  Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Run out of papyrus?
And yet they're capable of typing words into a computer, isn't that amazing?
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 05:47:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-13 13:26:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 14:38:08 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
hee hee hee
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Arc Michael
2017-09-14 10:34:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Yĕhôshúa ≡ Michael
as Promised I returned. Seals released, go to upper left top. click. will update.
new: #hillaryclinton says she loves Voodoo ⇔ Cannibalism. Confirmed. She was pointing a voodoo doll at me this last weekend. Trumbull D. Soule, sD. runs pedophile ring. N.S.A. FBI—09142017AD 01:48 PDT NoHo. Alan Morton Dershowitz, b. September 1, 1938 , Brooklyn, New York, U.S., sDpedophile —09142017AD 02:31 PDT NoHo. Frank Giustra b. August 1957, Greater Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, sD— 09142017AD 02:46 PDT NoHo Child Trafficking and Pedophile . Founded: Lionsgate


Clinton Global Initiative. “ Beyond boarders” that fights child trafficking so that they could gain access to child traffickers to abduct children for child abuse and murder. Also Ratcliff foundation.

Frank Guistra works with Beast and is a buddy and these people are trying to kill me , a Canadian billionaire Radcliff Foundation.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
hee hee hee
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-13 14:44:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 15:13:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-13 15:32:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
They get delivered. Not so much by the phone company, but by independent
publishers. They can also be picked up when a new edition first comes
out at the library, local tourist offices and around town.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 16:25:13 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
They get delivered. Not so much by the phone company, but by independent
publishers. They can also be picked up when a new edition first comes
out at the library, local tourist offices and around town.
I'm just messing with you Suzzeq. :)
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-13 16:54:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
They get delivered. Not so much by the phone company, but by independent
publishers. They can also be picked up when a new edition first comes
out at the library, local tourist offices and around town.
I'm just messing with you Suzzeq. :)
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 17:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
They get delivered. Not so much by the phone company, but by independent
publishers. They can also be picked up when a new edition first comes
out at the library, local tourist offices and around town.
I'm just messing with you Suzzeq. :)
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-13 18:08:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
I saw a TV ad for a phone book some time in the last couple of weeks.
At least I think it was an ad for a phone book. In the ad, the dad used
the book for its logical purpose: he set it down in front of the toilet
so that it could be used as a stepstool for his son.
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-13 18:18:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
I saw a TV ad for a phone book some time in the last couple of weeks.
At least I think it was an ad for a phone book. In the ad, the dad used
the book for its logical purpose: he set it down in front of the toilet
so that it could be used as a stepstool for his son.
Growing up in the hills of West Virginia without running water the yellow pages served double doodie in the outhouse. That's why it's called the reading room.

We were poor, our hands were dirty but our hearts were clean.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-13 19:16:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
I saw a TV ad for a phone book some time in the last couple of weeks.
At least I think it was an ad for a phone book. In the ad, the dad used
the book for its logical purpose: he set it down in front of the toilet
so that it could be used as a stepstool for his son.
Hah.

The Emergency Chiropractic singing duck ads I did were so long ago they
used to have him say "Look for me on the back cover of your phone book!"
and they've retooled them to be rid of the reference, aurally and
visually.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-13 20:27:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
I saw a TV ad for a phone book some time in the last couple of weeks.
At least I think it was an ad for a phone book. In the ad, the dad used
the book for its logical purpose: he set it down in front of the toilet
so that it could be used as a stepstool for his son.
Hah.
The Emergency Chiropractic singing duck ads I did were so long ago they
used to have him say "Look for me on the back cover of your phone book!"
and they've retooled them to be rid of the reference, aurally and
visually.
Look for us on a billboard near you?
suzeeq
2017-09-13 19:30:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Oh, I'm sure there's some people who don't even know what a phone book is.
yeppers
I saw a TV ad for a phone book some time in the last couple of weeks.
At least I think it was an ad for a phone book. In the ad, the dad used
the book for its logical purpose: he set it down in front of the toilet
so that it could be used as a stepstool for his son.
Ours are too small for that.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-14 03:59:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 04:12:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Obveeus
2017-09-14 04:16:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
You may know them better as Superman's changing rooms.
A Friend
2017-09-14 11:24:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
You may know them better as Superman's changing rooms.
So *that's* why he always smelled like wino piss! Another mystery
solved.
b***@gmail.com
2017-09-14 08:32:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The doctor's timeship?
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-14 16:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot
cars and self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any
part of it. I'll keep my own car, with no internet connection
or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or GPS pre-installed trackers, thank
you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
suzeeq
2017-09-14 18:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot
cars and self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any
part of it. I'll keep my own car, with no internet connection
or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or GPS pre-installed trackers, thank
you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-14 18:23:34 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot
cars and self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any
part of it. I'll keep my own car, with no internet connection
or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or GPS pre-installed trackers, thank
you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
suzeeq
2017-09-14 18:32:05 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 19:31:17 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
--
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https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-14 19:44:04 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
I was in S Idaho a year ago attending a family reunion and there was a
phone book, but no BoM. And you'd think you'd find one there...
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 19:51:04 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
I was in S Idaho a year ago attending a family reunion and there was a
phone book, but no BoM. And you'd think you'd find one there...
Maybe they figure everybody there already has one. At least now they
can sell beer in movie theaters.

I'm amazed I've yet to run into a Koran in a hotel room. Which will be
the last time I'll go to that hotel.
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suzeeq
2017-09-14 20:19:12 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
I was in S Idaho a year ago attending a family reunion and there was a
phone book, but no BoM. And you'd think you'd find one there...
Maybe they figure everybody there already has one.
They'd be trying to convert the gentiles though.
Post by anim8rfsk
At least now they can sell beer in movie theaters.
You know the capital of Idaho is Salt Lake City, right?
Post by anim8rfsk
I'm amazed I've yet to run into a Koran in a hotel room. Which will be
the last time I'll go to that hotel.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-14 20:20:11 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
You know the capital of Idaho is Salt Lake City, right?
Hahahahahahaha
suzeeq
2017-09-14 20:35:36 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
You know the capital of Idaho is Salt Lake City, right?
Hahahahahahaha
It's true. Though our liquor laws aren't quite as strict as Utah's. But
not quite as loose as California's.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 20:42:34 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
I was in S Idaho a year ago attending a family reunion and there was a
phone book, but no BoM. And you'd think you'd find one there...
Maybe they figure everybody there already has one.
They'd be trying to convert the gentiles though.
Post by anim8rfsk
At least now they can sell beer in movie theaters.
You know the capital of Idaho is Salt Lake City, right?
I thought the capital of Idaho was about $50. Same as in town.
--
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Lesmond
2017-09-15 03:51:29 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
I was in S Idaho a year ago attending a family reunion and there was a
phone book, but no BoM. And you'd think you'd find one there...
Maybe they figure everybody there already has one.
They'd be trying to convert the gentiles though.
Post by anim8rfsk
At least now they can sell beer in movie theaters.
You know the capital of Idaho is Salt Lake City, right?
I thought the capital of Idaho was about $50. Same as in town.
The capital of Idaho is "I".
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-14 20:19:34 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
Trey and Matt's?

I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 20:41:09 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
Trey and Matt's?
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
BTR1701
2017-09-14 21:58:49 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
A couple of years ago I was in a hotel in Seattle and noticed a charge on
my bill for "phone availability".

I asked about it and apparently it was their way of making up for all the
lost revenue caused by people using their cell phones instead of the room
phone. Instead of charging for calls, they were charging for the
opportunity to make calls-- i.e., they made a phone available for you to
use and you were charged for that 'convenience' whether you actually used
the phone or not.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 22:07:32 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
A couple of years ago I was in a hotel in Seattle and noticed a charge on
my bill for "phone availability".
I asked about it and apparently it was their way of making up for all the
lost revenue caused by people using their cell phones instead of the room
phone. Instead of charging for calls, they were charging for the
opportunity to make calls-- i.e., they made a phone available for you to
use and you were charged for that 'convenience' whether you actually used
the phone or not.
Geez. I assume you can't opt out, and they do this separately to make
it look like they really have a lower room rate?
--
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BTR1701
2017-09-14 22:46:02 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
A couple of years ago I was in a hotel in Seattle and noticed a charge on
my bill for "phone availability".
I asked about it and apparently it was their way of making up for all the
lost revenue caused by people using their cell phones instead of the room
phone. Instead of charging for calls, they were charging for the
opportunity to make calls-- i.e., they made a phone available for you to
use and you were charged for that 'convenience' whether you actually used
the phone or not.
Geez. I assume you can't opt out, and they do this separately to make
it look like they really have a lower room rate?
Of course.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-15 03:23:40 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
A couple of years ago I was in a hotel in Seattle and noticed a charge on
my bill for "phone availability".
I asked about it and apparently it was their way of making up for all the
lost revenue caused by people using their cell phones instead of the room
phone. Instead of charging for calls, they were charging for the
opportunity to make calls-- i.e., they made a phone available for you to
use and you were charged for that 'convenience' whether you actually used
the phone or not.
Isn't that convenient.

Lemme guess: The motel chain was owned by Brian Roberts of Comcast.
Dimensional Traveler
2017-09-14 21:59:15 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
Trey and Matt's?
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
You program your wake up calls into the hotel's automated system via the
room phone. As of about 10 or so years ago.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 22:08:08 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
"Pay phone"?
The page you needed to look at in the yellow pages classification has
already been torn out.
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
No the phone book. Though now that you mention it...
I haven't seen a phone book in a motel room in decades. They *do* have
the Book of Mormon though.
Trey and Matt's?
I'm surprised they no longer place phone books in motel rooms, given
the huge surcharges motels charge for calls placed from the room. You'd
think they'd want to encourage customers to use the room phone.
Do people actually use the room phone anymore, except maybe when calling
the desk?
You program your wake up calls into the hotel's automated system via the
room phone. As of about 10 or so years ago.
LOL, my wake up alarms live on my iPhone.
--
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Lesmond
2017-09-15 03:48:59 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
While driving to the elclipse last month, we stayed at a Days Inn somewhere
in Virginia. They had not only the bible, but also the Bhagavad Gita. I
was impressed.
--
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But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
anim8rfsk
2017-09-15 05:01:50 UTC
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Post by Lesmond
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
While driving to the elclipse last month, we stayed at a Days Inn somewhere
in Virginia. They had not only the bible, but also the Bhagavad Gita. I
was impressed.
In Sanskrit??
--
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Lesmond
2017-09-15 05:45:22 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Lesmond
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Yes. Or the book in a motel room.
The Gideon bible?
While driving to the elclipse last month, we stayed at a Days Inn somewhere
in Virginia. They had not only the bible, but also the Bhagavad Gita. I
was impressed.
In Sanskrit??
I'm glad it was in English. I read a bit. Just because I never had.
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
suzeeq
2017-09-14 13:07:36 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 15:29:12 UTC
Permalink
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Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
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suzeeq
2017-09-14 16:37:43 UTC
Permalink
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 18:11:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely
nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no
mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-14 18:19:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely
nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no
mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 19:30:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of
whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises
some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell
out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth
Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely
nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no
mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while
he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars
and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of
it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
Yep. We get that a couple times a day. Usually in the dead of winter.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 19:44:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of
whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises
some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell
out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth
Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely
nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no
mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while
he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot
cars
and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part
of
it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old
and
doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of
that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
Yep. We get that a couple times a day. Usually in the dead of winter.
Couple times a *year*
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
suzeeq
2017-09-14 20:17:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
Yep. We get that a couple times a day. Usually in the dead of winter.
Couple times a *year*
I wondered if that's what you meant.
anim8rfsk
2017-09-14 20:41:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
Yep. We get that a couple times a day. Usually in the dead of winter.
Couple times a *year*
I wondered if that's what you meant.
It is! It is!!
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
b***@gmail.com
2017-09-14 21:27:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by Obveeus
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of
whether
or
not
you
really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically
update
the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises
some
serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good
to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell
out
of
Florida.
But it works the other way too, as law professor Elizabeth
Joh
points
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a
demonstration
of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely
nothing
was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no
mechanical
linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then
applies
brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to
murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while
he's
driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars
and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of
it.
I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or
OnStar-fancy-whatsits
or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and
doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
They include them inside the Yellow Pages.
Another reason I keep a phone book in the car.
Where do you even get those?
Phone booth hanging from a hook under the pay phone.
What pay phones?
JIIIIIINNNNNNXXXXXXXXX
You can have the ice cream. Yesterday was the last day of summer, going
to be mid 60s the next few days before it goes down to the 50s. Time to
think about turning on the heat.
96 here, headed for 98, then dropping to 73 in the middle of the night
...
I'd take 73 for a daytime high - perfect!
Some places, that's as hot as it gets.
suzeeq
2017-09-13 14:41:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Where do you even get those?
I have a supply saved up, I collect them. But you can still find them
along with road atlases at walmart, kmart, target, truck stops...
Lesmond
2017-09-13 11:57:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Wow.
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
suzeeq
2017-09-13 14:43:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Wow.
Don't have a smart phone so I can't call up google. I sometimes look it
up before I go if it's somewhere specific I haven't been yet, or to look
up mileage.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-13 13:17:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or not you really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically update the physical product you bought from them,
it at least raises some serious questions. Yes, in this case,
it's being used for a good purpose: to hopefully make it easier
for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida. But it works
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages. A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which
then applies brake. The potential for sabotage is enormous. If
you're trying to murder someone, just upgrade the software in his
vehicle... while he's driving, or brick the vehicle immediately in
front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Me too.
b***@gmail.com
2017-09-13 14:34:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by A Friend
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or not you really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically update the physical product you bought from them,
it at least raises some serious questions. Yes, in this case,
it's being used for a good purpose: to hopefully make it easier
for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida. But it works
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages. A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which
then applies brake. The potential for sabotage is enormous. If
you're trying to murder someone, just upgrade the software in his
vehicle... while he's driving, or brick the vehicle immediately in
front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
My Toyota Tacoma's only ten years old and doesn't have any of that,
either. Any navigating I have to do, I've got the iPhone.
I use a paper map.
Have you used WAZE on your phone? It speaks out the directions to you.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-13 04:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
GPS, yeah, but cars have had central processing units for a lot longer
than that. I'm trying to avoid having something change computer code.
shawn
2017-09-13 08:56:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 04:35:07 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
GPS, yeah, but cars have had central processing units for a lot longer
than that. I'm trying to avoid having something change computer code.
With older cars there wasn't any way to upgrade the computer code
without having physical access to the car. If someone has physical
access to the car they can sabotage it in many ways. The new cars are
the ones that allow people to update the firmware remotely as well as
control features remotely. It's already been shown that hackers can
control much of the car today with remote hacks. Just not yet enough
to kill someone without physical access, but give them time. That's
why I'm also a bit leary of giving up too much control of a car.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-09-13 13:25:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by shawn
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether
or not you really own what you've bought. When a company can
automagically update the physical product you bought from them,
it at least raises some serious questions. Yes, in this case,
it's being used for a good purpose: to hopefully make it easier
for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida. But it works
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration
of modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing
was mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical
linkages. A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which
then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
GPS, yeah, but cars have had central processing units for a lot longer
than that. I'm trying to avoid having something change computer code.
With older cars there wasn't any way to upgrade the computer code
without having physical access to the car. If someone has physical
access to the car they can sabotage it in many ways.
True, it's just that very few people work on their own cars any more.
Vehicle owners give strangers access to their cars at repair, or when
the mandatory vehicle emissions test is performed, in which a stranger
accesses the CPU's data port. Or just break into a car sitting in a
parking lot for hours.
Post by shawn
The new cars are the ones that allow people to update the firmware
remotely as well as control features remotely. It's already been shown
that hackers can control much of the car today with remote hacks. Just
not yet enough to kill someone without physical access, but give them
time. That's why I'm also a bit leary of giving up too much control of
a car.
It's getting worse. I'm just pointing out that the danger has been there
for a long time, and there's never been any such thing as a fool proof
vehicle securement system.
BTR1701
2017-09-13 15:05:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
You don't have to have one that old. My car is 16 years old and doesn't
have any of that.
GPS, yeah, but cars have had central processing units for a lot longer
than that. I'm trying to avoid having something change computer code.
Sure, but the age of always-connected cars that can send and receive
information at all times over the internet is relatively recent.

My 4Runner may have some little computer running the engine and
electrical system, but it can't talk to anything else outside the car
unless it's brought into a garage and physically hooked up to a
diagnostic machine.
BTR1701
2017-09-13 04:18:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
1998 Toyota 4Runner. Still runs like a dream.

(Course it helps that I've been commuting to and from work every day for
20 years in my issued government car, so the mileage is very low on my
4Runner, given its age.)
Lesmond
2017-09-13 11:46:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Is it 50 years old?
Mine is a 2009 Scion xB. I have never owned a car I loved more.
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
Lesmond
2017-09-13 11:35:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police.
It's scarier than that. 10 years ago, I was given a demonstration of
modern computerized control systems on a bus. Absolutely nothing was
mechanical. The familiar brake and gas pedals have no mechanical linkages.
A signal is sent to the central processing unit, which then applies brake.
The potential for sabotage is enormous. If you're trying to murder
someone, just upgrade the software in his vehicle... while he's driving,
or brick the vehicle immediately in front of him.
Yeah, everyone's acting like this brave new age of robot cars and
self-driving gizmos is so fantastic. I don't want any part of it. I'll
keep my own car, with no internet connection or OnStar-fancy-whatsits or
GPS pre-installed trackers, thank you very much.
Yes.
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
b***@gmail.com
2017-09-12 20:36:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
. . . But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police. . . .
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extended-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
You've quoted from this website twice in a row. Are you advertizing for them or something?
BTR1701
2017-09-13 01:08:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by b***@gmail.com
. . . But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police. . . .
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extende
d-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
You've quoted from this website twice in a row. Are you advertizing for them or something?
No more than you're advertising for CNN by quoting from them multiple
times, you syphilitic ass canker.
trotsky
2017-09-13 10:54:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by b***@gmail.com
. . . But this brings us back to the same old discussion of whether or not you
really own what you've bought. When a company can automagically update the
physical product you bought from them, it at least raises some serious
questions. Yes, in this case, it's being used for a good purpose: to
hopefully make it easier for Tesla owners to get the hell out of Florida.
This sounds great until you realize the
power to brick a car is useful to corporations
and the police. . . .
https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20170910/19392338181/tesla-remotely-extende
d-range-drivers-florida-free-thats-not-good-thing.shtml
You've quoted from this website twice in a row. Are you advertizing for them
or something?
No more than you're advertising for CNN by quoting from them multiple
times, you syphilitic ass canker.
So that would be a "Yes"?
RichA
2017-09-13 08:36:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
This is just a portent of what is coming, complete state control of private cars. At some point, you won't do any driving, it'll all be done by the mighty state and where you can go will be regulated, either by cost or outright physical control or both.
t***@gmail.com
2017-09-13 14:38:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RichA
This is just a portent of what is coming, complete state control of private cars. At some point, you won't do any driving, it'll all be done by the mighty state and where you can go will be regulated, either by cost or outright physical control or both.
Hacking Dianne Feinstein
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.tv/dMANZgl3X5I/UD7nGgXXAQAJ
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