Discussion:
Saving Hope: the finale (with spoilers)
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Robin Miller
2017-08-11 00:54:03 UTC
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<spoilers>

<spoilers>

<spoilers>

<spoilers>

<spoilers>

<spoilers>


I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.

I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)

The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.

Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.

The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.

It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.

I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.

Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.

--Robin
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-11 02:01:01 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
I've been expecting this for a while, and the sudden diversion to the
accident scene was no surprise to me. After that, it was just a matter
of timing.

And, of course, the recap on the Previouslies kept going back to his
first crash.
Post by Robin Miller
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.
Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.
--Robin
My only question:

Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
Robin Miller
2017-08-11 02:21:37 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
I've been expecting this for a while, and the sudden diversion to the
accident scene was no surprise to me. After that, it was just a matter
of timing.
And, of course, the recap on the Previouslies kept going back to his
first crash.
Post by Robin Miller
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.
Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.
--Robin
Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
He might have a problem with that one that tried to convince Charlie
that he was innocent of the murder he did commit. But the others would
probably come to Charlie's defense.

--Robin
anim8rfsk
2017-08-11 02:24:28 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
I've been expecting this for a while, and the sudden diversion to the
accident scene was no surprise to me. After that, it was just a matter
of timing.
And, of course, the recap on the Previouslies kept going back to his
first crash.
Post by Robin Miller
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.
Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.
--Robin
Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
Didn't he in the first ep? I thought that was the premise of the show.
:)
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-11 04:46:39 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
Didn't he in the first ep? I thought that was the premise of the show.
:)
It just keeps happening, over and over.
Adam H. Kerman
2017-08-11 03:04:41 UTC
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Permalink
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
I've been expecting this for a while, and the sudden diversion to the
accident scene was no surprise to me. After that, it was just a matter
of timing.
And, of course, the recap on the Previouslies kept going back to his
first crash.
Post by Robin Miller
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.
Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.
--Robin
Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
Shouldn't he be replaced with Corin Nemec?
Lesmond
2017-08-12 05:49:20 UTC
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Permalink
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
I've been expecting this for a while, and the sudden diversion to the
accident scene was no surprise to me. After that, it was just a matter
of timing.
And, of course, the recap on the Previouslies kept going back to his
first crash.
Post by Robin Miller
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
I was disappointed that Maggie didn't return for the finale. Did the
actress have another engagement? I liked that her character was given a
send-off, and I liked that she ended up with Dr. Katz. I didn't
understand why Cassie was given a send-off, as she was not an important,
or even particularly likable, character. I thought it was a little
curious that they brought back Jeremy, who was a short-timer on the
show, but didn't acknowledge, at least through flashbacks, the important
characters that had left the show (Gavin and Joel). But I suppose the
final episode was devoted to bringing closure to Alex and Charlie's
story and not to memorializing the show as a whole.
Ultimately I decided that I liked the ending, having accepted the
showrunner's intent, and thought it was well-done. I will miss the show
and the characters. It was one of my favorites over its lifetime.
--Robin
Does Charlie get kicked out of the afterlife by the other Ascended
Beings?
Shouldn't he be replaced with Corin Nemec?
Parker Lewis?
--
She may contain the urge to run away
But hold her down with soggy clothes and breeze blocks
icebreaker
2017-08-11 21:12:37 UTC
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
When was there a hiatus? Do you mean between the first half and the
second half of the season? CTV splits its shows that way. Saving Hope
has always had a break at the midway point of airing. Run the first 9
episodes or so and then wait and then after a break run the last half.
ION ran a week or so behind CTV, I think, as I did the finale in the
wdyw thread sometime back. Not that any of this makes a whit of
difference anyway, :)

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Robin Miller
2017-08-11 21:54:14 UTC
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Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
<spoilers>
I really liked this show. I'm not sure why I decided to try it, maybe
because I've often enjoyed medical shows, maybe because I was curious to
see Michael Shanks in a different role after Stargate. For whatever
reason, I tried it, and I liked it, and I watched it religiously. I was
pissed that NBC crapped out during the first season and didn't even
broadcast the last few episodes, making them available only on their
website. I tried tunneling in to the CTV website during season two using
a VPN but the results weren't satisfactory, so I decided to wait for an
American channel to pick it up. I was surprised that it took as long as
it did, and then Ion waited a full year before actually scheduling the show.
I liked the characters, I liked their personal dramas, I liked the
medical cases, I did ship Charlie and Alex, and I didn't mind too much
that sometimes characters just disappeared without acknowledgement.
(Where'd you go, Dr. Reycraft?)
The ending was not what I expected. Since the next-to-last ("penultime")
episode set up incoming mass casualties, I expected the final episode to
show the team working madly to try to save everyone, succeeding often
but not always, and then end with the team taking a breather at the end
of the day, knowing that they had to come back in the morning and face
another day's challenges. And with Alex and Charlie finally getting
married along the way.
Instead, Charlie died, and at first I was upset. That was not what I
wanted. I like happy endings; I don't need death or tragedy to feel
satisfied. But I was not to be given what I wanted and expected.
Instead, the episode focused almost solely on bringing the series full
circle, and telling us that Charlie could have died, maybe should have
died, in the opening episode, but instead he and Alex were given five
more years (not all of it spent together) to life their lives, have two
children, and finally have their long-delayed wedding.
The ending was essentially identical to the ending in Medium, with the
husband dying young, the wife dying old (with family nearby), and the
two of them meeting in the afterlife in the final scene, about to spend
the rest of their existence together after lives well-lived.
It was interesting to see Erica Durance non-pregnant in the afterlife
scene. It was necessary, of course, and presumably explains why there
was a four-week hiatus in the broadcast schedule near the end of the season.
When was there a hiatus? Do you mean between the first half and the
second half of the season? CTV splits its shows that way. Saving Hope
has always had a break at the midway point of airing. Run the first 9
episodes or so and then wait and then after a break run the last half.
ION ran a week or so behind CTV, I think, as I did the finale in the
wdyw thread sometime back. Not that any of this makes a whit of
difference anyway, :)
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
I guess that was Ion's version of a mini-break. Episode 509 was shown on
May 9, and then 510 on June 13. I assumed it was due to Erica Durance's
pregnancy. Maybe not.


--Robin
shawn
2017-08-12 05:00:27 UTC
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
<***@invalid.invalid> wrote:

snipped text


+1

You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
Robin Miller
2017-08-12 05:38:56 UTC
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Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
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+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
Glad I wasn't the only one!

--Robin
ZZyXX
2017-08-12 19:07:49 UTC
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Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
Robin Miller
2017-08-12 19:37:02 UTC
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Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
I thought the same thing. I didn't think either kid looked 50 years old.

According to the Saving Hope Wiki, Charlotte was played by Nicole
Fraissinet (age ??) and adult Luke was played by Paul Popowich (age 44).

http://hopezion.wikia.com/wiki/Charlotte_Harris

http://hopezion.wikia.com/wiki/Luke_Reid-Harris

--Robin
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-12 21:01:58 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
Post by ZZyXX
Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
I thought the same thing. I didn't think either kid looked 50 years old.
According to the Saving Hope Wiki, Charlotte was played by Nicole
Fraissinet (age ??) and adult Luke was played by Paul Popowich (age 44).
http://hopezion.wikia.com/wiki/Charlotte_Harris
http://hopezion.wikia.com/wiki/Luke_Reid-Harris
--Robin
That far in the future, 50 will be the new 25.
NoBody
2017-08-13 14:48:08 UTC
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On Sat, 12 Aug 2017 12:07:49 -0700, ZZyXX
Post by ZZyXX
Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
I noticed the same continuity error. They probably meant 30 years
which would have been about right.
Robin Miller
2017-08-13 16:04:16 UTC
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Post by NoBody
On Sat, 12 Aug 2017 12:07:49 -0700, ZZyXX
Post by ZZyXX
Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
I noticed the same continuity error. They probably meant 30 years
which would have been about right.
They showed the very gnarled hands of an elderly woman. Those hands
belonged to someone at least in her 80s. That fit with the "50 years."

--Robin
NoBody
2017-08-14 11:08:14 UTC
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On Sun, 13 Aug 2017 12:04:16 -0400, Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
Post by NoBody
On Sat, 12 Aug 2017 12:07:49 -0700, ZZyXX
Post by ZZyXX
Post by icebreaker
On Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:54:03 -0400, Robin Miller
snipped text
+1
You have echoed the thoughts that I expressed upon seeing this
episode. It wasn't what I expected or wanted but I get the message the
producers were trying to send with this sendoff. While it wasn't what
I wanted it still was an enjoyable ending episode for the series.
I'm trying to parse that Alex said it had been 50 years, but it seemed
like her daughter said (in the hospital scene) Alex was dying and the
daughter didn't look to be 50 years old
I noticed the same continuity error. They probably meant 30 years
which would have been about right.
They showed the very gnarled hands of an elderly woman. Those hands
belonged to someone at least in her 80s. That fit with the "50 years."
Which was inconsistant with the age of her children. They should have
been grandchildren. Don't think they quite thought that one through.
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