Discussion:
"The Cloverfield Paradox"
(too old to reply)
trotsky
2018-02-11 09:34:45 UTC
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A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is. Suffice it to say between the
much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is
well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release
of first run movies. For eight bucks a month I can watch movies on my
65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want. Truth be told movie
theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore. Now if I can just
get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage...
t***@gmail.com
2018-02-11 12:28:27 UTC
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Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11 American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(franchise)#Cultural_impact



https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.tv/ELxHwmYdJTY/NHruKPV9AQAJ
Your Name
2018-02-11 21:51:37 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11
American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
Actually it isn't. It's the second separate pile of crap that has been
re-purposed by tacking on the "Cloverfield" name and has little to
nothing to do with the original "Cloverfield" movie ... which itself
was a boring, useless pile of crap by talentless, over-hyped hack
JarJar Abrams.
trotsky
2018-02-12 12:05:50 UTC
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Post by Your Name
Post by t***@gmail.com
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11
American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
Actually it isn't. It's the second separate pile of crap that has been
re-purposed by tacking on the "Cloverfield" name and has little to
nothing to do with the original "Cloverfield" movie ... which itself was
a boring, useless pile of crap by talentless, over-hyped hack JarJar
Abrams.
Actually, they took a stand alone sci fi story and were quite clever in
making it the prequel to the original Cloverfield. But then I saw the
actual movie.
t***@gmail.com
2018-02-12 12:46:25 UTC
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Post by trotsky
Post by Your Name
Post by t***@gmail.com
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11
American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
Actually it isn't. It's the second separate pile of crap that has been
re-purposed by tacking on the "Cloverfield" name and has little to
nothing to do with the original "Cloverfield" movie ... which itself was
a boring, useless pile of crap by talentless, over-hyped hack JarJar
Abrams.
Actually, they took a stand alone sci fi story and were quite clever in
making it the prequel to the original Cloverfield. But then I saw the
actual movie.
Yep. We now know the attack on New York City was closely tied to a quest for energy.

It's like a metaphor or an allegory, or some crap like that...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/***@N08/4624352665/

-----------------


t***@gmail.com
2018-02-12 16:22:35 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11 American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(franchise)#Cultural_impact
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.tv/ELxHwmYdJTY/NHruKPV9AQAJ
Slusho is a Japanese based company that gets its secret ingredient from the bottom of the ocean.
http://1-18-08.blogspot.com/2007/09/what-is-slusho.html


------------

Did you know besides the petroleum based fertilizers that grow the food necessary for modern civilizations to eat, it is estimated that the meals in the United States travel about 1,500 petroleum fueled miles to get from farm to plate?



trotsky
2018-02-12 22:33:25 UTC
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Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11 American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(franchise)#Cultural_impact
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.tv/ELxHwmYdJTY/NHruKPV9AQAJ
Slusho is a Japanese based company that gets its secret ingredient from the bottom of the ocean.
http://1-18-08.blogspot.com/2007/09/what-is-slusho.html
Hey, mime, can we assume you have your panties all in a bunch from this:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/benjamin-netanyahu-israel-fraud-bribery-criminal-claims-investigation-arnaud-mimran-a7497016.html
t***@gmail.com
2018-02-12 23:02:24 UTC
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Post by trotsky
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.
The Cloverfield Paradox is the third installment of the post 9/11 American-type Godzilla franchise, Cloverfield
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godzilla_(franchise)#Cultural_impact
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/rec.arts.tv/ELxHwmYdJTY/NHruKPV9AQAJ
Slusho is a Japanese based company that gets its secret ingredient from the bottom of the ocean.
http://1-18-08.blogspot.com/2007/09/what-is-slusho.html
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/benjamin-netanyahu-israel-fraud-bribery-criminal-claims-investigation-arnaud-mimran-a7497016.html
The allegations against Bibi are old news if you have been following my post about Mariah Carey and the Red Heifer. Bibi is on to a diversion tactic, provoking major conflict in Syria and Russia in an attempt to delay or stall the charges. Bibi is an asshole, the Israeli Jews need a more moderate, dare I say more American liberal-type government that will actually work for peace instead of stealing Palestinian land.

We return you now to "Slusho: there's a hole in the bottom of the sea and the contents of the hole are now in your digestive track..."



-----------------


Obveeus
2018-02-11 14:35:53 UTC
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A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say between the
much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is
well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release
of first run movies.
While I'm more interested in films like (IMDB rating):
BEASTS OF NO NATION, (7.8)
THE SIEGE OF JADOTVILLE, (7.3)
OKJA, (7.4)
TO THE BONE, (6.9)
FIRST THEY KILLED MY FATHER, (7.2)
THE MEYERWITZ STORIES (NEW AND SELECTED) (7.0)

...It is nice to see that Netflix can pump out big films for the masses
like:
BRIGHT (6.5)

and sort of for the masses
THE CLOVERFIED PARADOX. (5.8)
moviePig
2018-02-11 15:46:50 UTC
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Raw Message
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say between the
much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is
well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release
of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I can watch movies on my
65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want.  Truth be told movie
theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore.  Now if I can just
get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage. Doesn't sound, though, as if this
particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as a venue.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-11 16:32:49 UTC
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A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it
was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These
movies always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too
much garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say
between the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious
TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing itself as a major
player in the release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I
can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I
want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me
anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data
usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if this
particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as a venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position. I posted an
article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable fucking TV and
they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"? Do you even give a
fuck about facts of any kind? Just say that word that you don't want to
elevate your status as irrational and I'll move on to another discussion.

Hey, here's an interesting factoid:

http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over First Three Days
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moviePig
2018-02-11 16:51:41 UTC
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A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good,
the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production
was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little
from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship
it was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These
movies always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too
much garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say
between the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious
TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing itself as a major
player in the release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I
can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I
want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for
me anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my
data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as a
venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position.  I posted an
article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable fucking TV and
they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"?  Do you even give a
fuck about facts of any kind?  Just say that word that you don't want to
elevate your status as irrational and I'll move on to another discussion.
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some actual
experience of it. Meanwhile, though, do please post a (single, short)
sentence comprising the "untenable position" you think I "cling to".
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-11 17:53:07 UTC
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Post by moviePig
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good,
the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production
was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little
from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their
spaceship it was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at
times.  These movies always seem to suffer from too little science
fiction and too much garden variety thriller, but there it is.
Suffice it to say between the much more high profile "Bright" and
the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing
itself as a major player in the release of first run movies.  For
eight bucks a month I can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop
for breaks anytime I want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have
that much appeal for me anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to
stop screwing me on my data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as a
venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position.  I posted an
article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable fucking TV
and they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"?  Do you even give
a fuck about facts of any kind?  Just say that word that you don't
want to elevate your status as irrational and I'll move on to another
discussion.
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some actual
experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a (single, short)
sentence comprising the "untenable position" you think I "cling to".
Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as a
venue.
---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
moviePig
2018-02-11 18:05:01 UTC
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Post by moviePig
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good,
the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the
production was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and
borrowed a little from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went
awry on their spaceship it was mostly unpredictable and even a
little creepy at times.  These movies always seem to suffer from
too little science fiction and too much garden variety thriller,
but there it is. Suffice it to say between the much more high
profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is well on its
way to establishing itself as a major player in the release of
first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I can watch movies on my
65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want.  Truth be told
movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore.  Now if
I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as
a venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position.  I posted
an article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable fucking
TV and they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"?  Do you even
give a fuck about facts of any kind?  Just say that word that you
don't want to elevate your status as irrational and I'll move on to
another discussion.
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some actual
experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a (single, short)
sentence comprising the "untenable position" you think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as
a venue.
...which means: tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors. You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Obveeus
2018-02-11 18:53:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good,
the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the
production was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and
borrowed a little from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went
awry on their spaceship it was mostly unpredictable and even a
little creepy at times.  These movies always seem to suffer from
too little science fiction and too much garden variety thriller,
but there it is. Suffice it to say between the much more high
profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is well on
its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release of
first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I can watch movies on
my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want.  Truth be
told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore.
Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status as
a venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position.  I posted
an article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable fucking
TV and they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"?  Do you even
give a fuck about facts of any kind?  Just say that word that you
don't want to elevate your status as irrational and I'll move on to
another discussion.
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some actual
experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a (single,
short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you think I
"cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Why would Netflix be trying to 'make Netflix more attractive to
distributors'?

Netflix is its own distributor, all around the globe, everywhere aside
from China (sort of). Netflix delivers its product right to the user
via the internet. They aren't looking for a 'distributor'.
moviePig
2018-02-11 19:57:07 UTC
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Post by Obveeus
Post by moviePig
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very
good, the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the
production was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and
borrowed a little from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went
awry on their spaceship it was mostly unpredictable and even a
little creepy at times.  These movies always seem to suffer from
too little science fiction and too much garden variety thriller,
but there it is. Suffice it to say between the much more high
profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is well on
its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release
of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I can watch movies
on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want.  Truth
be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me
anymore. Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my
data usage...
Credit, anyway, for your pilgrimage.  Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
I can't stand people that cling to an untenable position.  I posted
an article that Netflix subscribership exceeds that of cable
fucking TV and they aren't "elevating their status as a venue"?  Do
you even give a fuck about facts of any kind?  Just say that word
that you don't want to elevate your status as irrational and I'll
move on to another discussion.
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Why would Netflix be trying to 'make Netflix more attractive to
distributors'?
Netflix is its own distributor, all around the globe, everywhere aside
from China (sort of).  Netflix delivers its product right to the user
via the internet.  They aren't looking for a 'distributor'.
Yes. I could've said, "as a distribution channel".
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-11 19:58:55 UTC
Permalink
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Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some actual
experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a (single,
short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you think I
"cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack. This has everything to do with how
the movie biz works. For example, do you realize that Netflix doesn't
worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio that produced
that movie?
moviePig
2018-02-11 20:03:07 UTC
Permalink
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Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with how
the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix doesn't
worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio that produced
that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-11 20:50:15 UTC
Permalink
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Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's status
as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with how
the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix doesn't
worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio that produced
that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable. IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are the
production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says "Netflix
and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got first billing.)
Going to the Google machine shows Netflix apparently bought the rights
from Paramount. Here's the article:

https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies. I've
watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it streaming before
they show it theatrically. Again, a totally different approach to
watching a first run movie. Netflix did something brilliant by putting
an ad on during the Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification
by making it available to watch that day. You tell me, how is that
different from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for
the movie to come out? How many thousands or millions of people signed
up for a free trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were
thinking about it? I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't.
If not just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks,
while you watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely
and more and more movies are release via streaming video instead of
theatrically. At this point it's almost as if the big budget
blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release anyway.
moviePig
2018-02-11 21:44:44 UTC
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Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's
status as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with how
the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix
doesn't worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio that
produced that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable.  IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are the
production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says "Netflix
and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got first billing.)
Going to the Google machine shows Netflix apparently bought the rights
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.  I've
watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it streaming before
they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally different approach to
watching a first run movie.  Netflix did something brilliant by putting
an ad on during the Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification
by making it available to watch that day.  You tell me, how is that
different from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for
the movie to come out?  How many thousands or millions of people signed
up for a free trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were
thinking about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If
not just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while
you watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely and
more and more movies are release via streaming video instead of
theatrically.  At this point it's almost as if the big budget
blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway. But then, one always is.
Dogs older(!) than I am should remember when TV itself was to be the
death of theaters. And I've personally been posting for years about how
*headsets* would become the nonpareil movie venue. (Hasn't happened.)

Still, *this* present discussion was prompted by my (continued, however
"untenable") assertion that tCP's emergence vis Netflix did not -- at
this moment in market history -- bode well for the movie's quality.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Obveeus
2018-02-11 23:19:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Still, *this* present discussion was prompted by my (continued, however
"untenable") assertion that tCP's emergence vis Netflix did not -- at
this moment in market history -- bode well for the movie's quality.
Not so much a mark of 'non-quality' as a mark of 'non-profitability'.
Paramount had dumped so much into the development that they feared the
horror genre audience couldn't fill enough seats to cover those costs.
When Netflix came along and offered them a guaranteed profit, Paramount
went for the easy win.
trotsky
2018-02-12 11:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Obveeus
Post by moviePig
Still, *this* present discussion was prompted by my (continued,
however "untenable") assertion that tCP's emergence vis Netflix did
not -- at this moment in market history -- bode well for the movie's
quality.
Not so much a mark of 'non-quality' as a mark of 'non-profitability'.
Paramount had dumped so much into the development that they feared the
horror genre audience couldn't fill enough seats to cover those costs.
When Netflix came along and offered them a guaranteed profit, Paramount
went for the easy win.
If you read the article I posted Paramount broke even at best. But you
were close.
trotsky
2018-02-12 11:48:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers Over
First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's
status as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to make
Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that good?
...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with
how the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix
doesn't worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio
that produced that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable.  IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are the
production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says
"Netflix and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got first
billing.) Going to the Google machine shows Netflix apparently bought
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.  I've
watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it streaming before
they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally different approach to
watching a first run movie.  Netflix did something brilliant by
putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and giving people instant
gratification by making it available to watch that day.  You tell me,
how is that different from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks
or months for the movie to come out?  How many thousands or millions
of people signed up for a free trial of Netflix just to watch the
movie while they were thinking about it?  I find this stuff
fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not just keep on being the old dog
reluctant to learn new tricks, while you watch software other than
vinyl records disappear completely and more and more movies are
release via streaming video instead of theatrically.  At this point
it's almost as if the big budget blockbusters are reserved for
theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure. Name some of the other ones.
moviePig
2018-02-12 15:22:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers
Over First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position" you
think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's
status as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to
make Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's that
good? ...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with
how the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix
doesn't worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio
that produced that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable.  IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are
the production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says
"Netflix and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got first
billing.) Going to the Google machine shows Netflix apparently bought
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it
streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally
different approach to watching a first run movie.  Netflix did
something brilliant by putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and
giving people instant gratification by making it available to watch
that day.  You tell me, how is that different from watching a trailer
and waiting days, weeks or months for the movie to come out?  How
many thousands or millions of people signed up for a free trial of
Netflix just to watch the movie while they were thinking about it?  I
find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not just keep on
being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while you watch
software other than vinyl records disappear completely and more and
more movies are release via streaming video instead of theatrically.
At this point it's almost as if the big budget blockbusters are
reserved for theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-12 22:30:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers
Over First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position"
you think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's
status as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to
make Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's
that good? ...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute
about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with
how the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that Netflix
doesn't worry about "distributors" when they're the movie studio
that produced that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable.  IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are
the production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says
"Netflix and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got
first billing.) Going to the Google machine shows Netflix apparently
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it
streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally
different approach to watching a first run movie.  Netflix did
something brilliant by putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and
giving people instant gratification by making it available to watch
that day.  You tell me, how is that different from watching a
trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for the movie to come
out?  How many thousands or millions of people signed up for a free
trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were thinking
about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not
just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while
you watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely and
more and more movies are release via streaming video instead of
theatrically. At this point it's almost as if the big budget
blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right. "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a shit?"
moviePig
2018-02-12 23:00:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
http://variety.com/2017/digital/news/netflix-bright-ratings-viewers-nielsen-1202649332/
Netflix’s ‘Bright’ Lands 11 Million U.S. Streaming Viewers
Over First Three Days
I was merely reacting to your review of tCP, for bringing some
actual experience of it.  Meanwhile, though, do please post a
(single, short) sentence comprising the "untenable position"
you think I "cling to".
 Doesn't sound, though, as if
Post by trotsky
this particular release will do much to elevate Netflix's
status as a venue.
...which means:  tCP doesn't sound like a good enough movie to
make Netflix more attractive to distributors.  You think it's
that good? ...so clearly 'that good' as to obviate any dispute
about it?
Hey, let's take a different tack.  This has everything to do with
how the movie biz works.  For example, do you realize that
Netflix doesn't worry about "distributors" when they're the movie
studio that produced that movie?
Actually, I thought they *weren't* the studio that produced the movie.
That's reasonable.  IMDB says Paramount and Bad Robot (Abrams) are
the production companies, but the opening credits of the movie says
"Netflix and Paramount Pictures present" (I believe Netflix got
first billing.) Going to the Google machine shows Netflix
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show it
streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally
different approach to watching a first run movie.  Netflix did
something brilliant by putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and
giving people instant gratification by making it available to watch
that day.  You tell me, how is that different from watching a
trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for the movie to come
out?  How many thousands or millions of people signed up for a free
trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were thinking
about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not
just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while
you watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely
and more and more movies are release via streaming video instead of
theatrically. At this point it's almost as if the big budget
blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a
shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway. Ymmv.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-13 10:28:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show
it streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally
different approach to watching a first run movie.  Netflix did
something brilliant by putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and
giving people instant gratification by making it available to
watch that day.  You tell me, how is that different from watching
a trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for the movie to come
out?  How many thousands or millions of people signed up for a
free trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were
thinking about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you
don't. If not just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn
new tricks, while you watch software other than vinyl records
disappear completely and more and more movies are release via
streaming video instead of theatrically. At this point it's almost
as if the big budget blockbusters are reserved for theatrical
release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a
shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage? I'm posting articles to support what I say. You're posting
crap. Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
moviePig
2018-02-13 15:19:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they show
it streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a totally
different approach to watching a first run movie.  Netflix did
something brilliant by putting an ad on during the Super Bowl and
giving people instant gratification by making it available to
watch that day.  You tell me, how is that different from watching
a trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for the movie to come
out?  How many thousands or millions of people signed up for a
free trial of Netflix just to watch the movie while they were
thinking about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you
don't. If not just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn
new tricks, while you watch software other than vinyl records
disappear completely and more and more movies are release via
streaming video instead of theatrically. At this point it's
almost as if the big budget blockbusters are reserved for
theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a
shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're posting
crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves. Yeah, Netflix is gaining market
share -- for a while now. Whether the earth moves remains to be seen.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Obveeus
2018-02-13 15:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first
run movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they
show it streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a
totally different approach to watching a first run movie.
Netflix did something brilliant by putting an ad on during the
Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification by making it
available to watch that day.  You tell me, how is that different
from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks or months for
the movie to come out?  How many thousands or millions of people
signed up for a free trial of Netflix just to watch the movie
while they were thinking about it?  I find this stuff
fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not just keep on being the
old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while you watch software
other than vinyl records disappear completely and more and more
movies are release via streaming video instead of theatrically.
At this point it's almost as if the big budget blockbusters are
reserved for theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining market
share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to be seen.
Nope. The Earth moved. I don't know how you didn't feel it. Netflix
as a company might not even survive the year (if Apple buys them out),
but the shift to streaming delivery of entertainment product is not just
some flash in the pan irrelevance the way 3D has turned out to be in
every itteration.
moviePig
2018-02-13 15:43:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first
run movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where they
show it streaming before they show it theatrically.  Again, a
totally different approach to watching a first run movie.
Netflix did something brilliant by putting an ad on during the
Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification by making it
available to watch that day.  You tell me, how is that
different from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks or
months for the movie to come out?  How many thousands or
millions of people signed up for a free trial of Netflix just
to watch the movie while they were thinking about it?  I find
this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not just keep on
being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while you
watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely
and more and more movies are release via streaming video
instead of theatrically. At this point it's almost as if the
big budget blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release
anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Nope.  The Earth moved.  I don't know how you didn't feel it.  Netflix
as a company might not even survive the year (if Apple buys them out),
but the shift to streaming delivery of entertainment product is not just
some flash in the pan irrelevance the way 3D has turned out to be in
every itteration.
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct? And, if
they become so, did that "paradigm shift" actually begin in the '50s,
with television? Was it a paradigm shift when VHS-rental stores
proliferated like mayflies, and then vanished just as quickly? Me, I
suspect such answers depend on whose paradigm is being shifted...
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Obveeus
2018-02-13 16:13:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first
run movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where
they show it streaming before they show it theatrically.
Again, a totally different approach to watching a first run
movie. Netflix did something brilliant by putting an ad on
during the Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification
by making it available to watch that day.  You tell me, how is
that different from watching a trailer and waiting days, weeks
or months for the movie to come out?  How many thousands or
millions of people signed up for a free trial of Netflix just
to watch the movie while they were thinking about it?  I find
this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't. If not just keep on
being the old dog reluctant to learn new tricks, while you
watch software other than vinyl records disappear completely
and more and more movies are release via streaming video
instead of theatrically. At this point it's almost as if the
big budget blockbusters are reserved for theatrical release
anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Nope.  The Earth moved.  I don't know how you didn't feel it.  Netflix
as a company might not even survive the year (if Apple buys them out),
but the shift to streaming delivery of entertainment product is not
just some flash in the pan irrelevance the way 3D has turned out to be
in every itteration.
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to.  But are theaters extinct?  And, if
they become so, did that "paradigm shift" actually begin in the '50s,
with television?  Was it a paradigm shift when VHS-rental stores
proliferated like mayflies, and then vanished just as quickly?  Me, I
suspect such answers depend on whose paradigm is being shifted...
I don't expect theaters to go extinct. I do think that streaming has
resulted in a transformation where people outside of New York City, Los
Angeles, and Chicago can now get access to smaller films. I also think
that, in general, the theater is moving further towards being an outlet
for 'blockbusters' and farther away from being a venue for everyone.
moviePig
2018-02-13 16:54:19 UTC
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Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/7/16986956/the-cloverfield-paradox-netflix-deal-paramount-cost
Post by moviePig
The Cloverfield Paradox may have cost Netflix more than $50 million
And it still may have been a good bet for both Netflix and
Paramount, which sold it off
By Tasha Robinson  Feb 7, 2018, 2:51pm EST
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first
run movies.  I've watched a couple of movies on Vudu where
they show it streaming before they show it theatrically.
Again, a totally different approach to watching a first run
movie. Netflix did something brilliant by putting an ad on
during the Super Bowl and giving people instant gratification
by making it available to watch that day.  You tell me, how
is that different from watching a trailer and waiting days,
weeks or months for the movie to come out?  How many
thousands or millions of people signed up for a free trial of
Netflix just to watch the movie while they were thinking
about it?  I find this stuff fascinating, perhaps you don't.
If not just keep on being the old dog reluctant to learn new
tricks, while you watch software other than vinyl records
disappear completely and more and more movies are release via
streaming video instead of theatrically. At this point it's
almost as if the big budget blockbusters are reserved for
theatrical release anyway.
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more
numerous than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is
gaining market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves
remains to be seen.
Nope.  The Earth moved.  I don't know how you didn't feel it.
Netflix as a company might not even survive the year (if Apple buys
them out), but the shift to streaming delivery of entertainment
product is not just some flash in the pan irrelevance the way 3D has
turned out to be in every itteration.
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to.  But are theaters extinct?  And, if
they become so, did that "paradigm shift" actually begin in the '50s,
with television?  Was it a paradigm shift when VHS-rental stores
proliferated like mayflies, and then vanished just as quickly?  Me, I
suspect such answers depend on whose paradigm is being shifted...
I don't expect theaters to go extinct.  I do think that streaming has
resulted in a transformation where people outside of New York City, Los
Angeles, and Chicago can now get access to smaller films.  I also think
that, in general, the theater is moving further towards being an outlet
for 'blockbusters' and farther away from being a venue for everyone.
Or, theaters will come up with something new (like CinemaScope). My
point would be merely that there are always lots of (tectonic) plates in
the air, and likely there always will be. Afaics, the distribution
"paradigm", in particular, has long been a relatively volatile one.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
BTR1701
2018-02-13 19:20:31 UTC
Permalink
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Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.

The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.

The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
moviePig
2018-02-13 19:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
You skipped past the intermdiate paradigm-shift where shock-mounted
hard-drives replaced the reeled cans. Ever since the day Gutenberg put
all the manuscript illuminators out of business, it's all been just one
big paradigm shift, really.

Meanwhile, I find appalling that it'd be worth someone's time to run the
popcorn girl to ground for peeking at the latest Tom Cruise adventure.
I'm guessing the quarry is most often screenings where tickets are sold.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-13 21:07:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
You skipped past the intermdiate paradigm-shift where shock-mounted
hard-drives replaced the reeled cans.  Ever since the day Gutenberg put
all the manuscript illuminators out of business, it's all been just one
big paradigm shift, really.
Meanwhile, I find appalling that it'd be worth someone's time to run the
popcorn girl to ground for peeking at the latest Tom Cruise adventure.
I'm guessing the quarry is most often screenings where tickets are sold.
Mpig, I think (?) you mean well but you're talking trash again.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14241277.2015.1055533
Post by moviePig
Until recently, the conventional rules for distributing feature films were largely set around analog technologies with business models based on rigid window systems and exclusivity. However, recent advances in digital technologies are changing the way audiences consume media, putting pressure on traditional models for releasing films.
This would appear to directly contradict what you're saying above. If
you want to live in your own private Idaho so be it. It would be
preferable if you could pop back into reality for a bit, though, and
pretend like the facts of the matter mean something.
moviePig
2018-02-13 21:14:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
You skipped past the intermdiate paradigm-shift where shock-mounted
hard-drives replaced the reeled cans.  Ever since the day Gutenberg
put all the manuscript illuminators out of business, it's all been
just one big paradigm shift, really.
Meanwhile, I find appalling that it'd be worth someone's time to run
the popcorn girl to ground for peeking at the latest Tom Cruise
adventure. I'm guessing the quarry is most often screenings where
tickets are sold.
Mpig, I think (?) you mean well but you're talking trash again.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14241277.2015.1055533
Post by moviePig
Until recently, the conventional rules for distributing feature films
were largely set around analog technologies with business models based
on rigid window systems and exclusivity. However, recent advances in
digital technologies are changing the way audiences consume media,
putting pressure on traditional models for releasing films.
This would appear to directly contradict what you're saying above.  If
you want to live in your own private Idaho so be it.  It would be
preferable if you could pop back into reality for a bit, though, and
pretend like the facts of the matter mean something.
Sorry, I don't see any contradiction, direct or otherwise.
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-13 21:21:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
You skipped past the intermdiate paradigm-shift where shock-mounted
hard-drives replaced the reeled cans.  Ever since the day Gutenberg
put all the manuscript illuminators out of business, it's all been
just one big paradigm shift, really.
Meanwhile, I find appalling that it'd be worth someone's time to run
the popcorn girl to ground for peeking at the latest Tom Cruise
adventure. I'm guessing the quarry is most often screenings where
tickets are sold.
Mpig, I think (?) you mean well but you're talking trash again.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14241277.2015.1055533
Post by moviePig
Until recently, the conventional rules for distributing feature films
were largely set around analog technologies with business models
based on rigid window systems and exclusivity. However, recent
advances in digital technologies are changing the way audiences
consume media, putting pressure on traditional models for releasing
films.
This would appear to directly contradict what you're saying above.  If
you want to live in your own private Idaho so be it.  It would be
preferable if you could pop back into reality for a bit, though, and
pretend like the facts of the matter mean something.
Sorry, I don't see any contradiction, direct or otherwise.
Of course you don't. "...it's all been just one big paradigm shift,
really" is directly contradicted by "Until recently, the conventional
rules of distributing feature films were largely set..."
moviePig
2018-02-13 21:53:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
You skipped past the intermdiate paradigm-shift where shock-mounted
hard-drives replaced the reeled cans.  Ever since the day Gutenberg
put all the manuscript illuminators out of business, it's all been
just one big paradigm shift, really.
Meanwhile, I find appalling that it'd be worth someone's time to run
the popcorn girl to ground for peeking at the latest Tom Cruise
adventure. I'm guessing the quarry is most often screenings where
tickets are sold.
Mpig, I think (?) you mean well but you're talking trash again.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14241277.2015.1055533
Post by moviePig
Until recently, the conventional rules for distributing feature
films were largely set around analog technologies with business
models based on rigid window systems and exclusivity. However,
recent advances in digital technologies are changing the way
audiences consume media, putting pressure on traditional models for
releasing films.
This would appear to directly contradict what you're saying above.
If you want to live in your own private Idaho so be it.  It would be
preferable if you could pop back into reality for a bit, though, and
pretend like the facts of the matter mean something.
Sorry, I don't see any contradiction, direct or otherwise.
Of course you don't.  "...it's all been just one big paradigm shift,
really" is directly contradicted by "Until recently, the conventional
rules of distributing feature films were largely set..."
Yes, I widened scope -- to make what I hoped would be an entertaining
observation. But you're absolutely right: the person whose job it is
to plan after-market product-release strategies will no doubt have felt
a great disturbance in the Force...
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-13 20:57:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
Wow, Thanny, that's actually an interesting post. I'm mildly shocked.
t***@gmail.com
2018-02-13 21:12:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
Wow, Thanny, that's actually an interesting post. I'm mildly shocked.
Wow, for some strange reason I want to sit around a campfire and sing a couple verses of Kumbaya !
trotsky
2018-02-13 21:19:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by t***@gmail.com
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by moviePig
Yes, the paradigm-shift of the Internet has affected every aspect of
conscious life, and continues to. But are theaters extinct?
Theaters are streaming, too. Gone are the days when the film would arrive
by truck in reeled cans.
The theater I patronize gets the film streamed in hi-def straight from the
distributor. Not sure what their backup plan is if the network goes down
and they have a theater full of paying customers, but that's how it's
delivered now.
The employee I was talking to about it groused that this system allows the
distributor and studio to control how often the movie is played and hold
theaters accountable for unauthorized showings. Used to be, when the movies
were projected from actual film, they'd have after-hours or pre-release
free showings for employees and select friends and family. Now with
streaming, the distributor knows if they do that and takes punitive
measures.
Wow, Thanny, that's actually an interesting post. I'm mildly shocked.
Wow, for some strange reason I want to sit around a campfire and sing a couple verses of Kumbaya !
Go for it. Do some Facebook live streaming while you're at it.
trotsky
2018-02-13 21:00:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Nope.  The Earth moved.  I don't know how you didn't feel it.  Netflix
as a company might not even survive the year (if Apple buys them out),
but the shift to streaming delivery of entertainment product is not just
some flash in the pan irrelevance the way 3D has turned out to be in
every itteration.
Shit, now Obveeus is making relevant posts. I'm going to modify my
scorecard a bit.
trotsky
2018-02-13 20:59:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining market
share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to be seen.
Sure. And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place? Netflix had
the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
moviePig
2018-02-13 21:11:41 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix had
the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'. Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte or
Luddite. (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
t***@gmail.com
2018-02-13 21:15:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives
a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix had
the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'. Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte or
Luddite. (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
Yes we were 8P


I can remember when MP3's were illegal to download, that's how old I am, LOL
Still kickin' it since 1998
trotsky
2018-02-13 21:18:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix
had the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'.  Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte or
Luddite.  (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
Label it how you want but you're late adopting of technology also seems
to concur with a late adopting of the facts. Thus the constant dodging
and weaving even when approached with similar facts from dudes that are
in no way fans of mine. (And vice versa.) I'm not even pissed anymore
because your mule like stubbornness somehow managed to further the
discussion.
moviePig
2018-02-13 22:07:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more
numerous than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is
gaining market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves
remains to be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix
had the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'.  Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte
or Luddite.  (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
Label it how you want but you're late adopting of technology also seems
to concur with a late adopting of the facts.  Thus the constant dodging
and weaving even when approached with similar facts from dudes that are
in no way fans of mine.  (And vice versa.)  I'm not even pissed anymore
because your mule like stubbornness somehow managed to further the
discussion.
If you have important 'facts' here that you think I'm not cognizant of,
then I'm all ears. But asserting that Netflix has, or will soon have,
turned the movie industry upside down seems a bit overeager. Afaics,
it's a new competitor, and has a ways to go before it becomes a major
studio (or, if it does, one somehow different from all the others).
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
trotsky
2018-02-14 11:16:11 UTC
Permalink
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Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one
always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more
numerous than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is
gaining market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves
remains to be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix
had the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'.  Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte
or Luddite.  (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
Label it how you want but you're late adopting of technology also
seems to concur with a late adopting of the facts.  Thus the constant
dodging and weaving even when approached with similar facts from dudes
that are in no way fans of mine.  (And vice versa.)  I'm not even
pissed anymore because your mule like stubbornness somehow managed to
further the discussion.
If you have important 'facts' here that you think I'm not cognizant of,
then I'm all ears.  But asserting that Netflix has, or will soon have,
turned the movie industry upside down seems a bit overeager.
Originally you claimed Neflix was some kind of "outsider" and I showed
you an article from last year that they've exceeded the entire number of
cable subscribers. You didn't acknowledge that fact, and the whole time
have stated your poorly formed opinions as fact or as in some way
meaningful. If you choose to stay ignorant on the subject that's your
choice, but if you expect to be taken seriously in a discussion like
this you're sadly mistaken. You do the same thing every time: you make
people sorry they've engaged you because of your vague, bloated, purple
prose responses. That's why I don't take these discussions seriously,
because you yourself can't be taken seriously. Even after people I
don't even real discussions with, Obveeus and "BTR1701" gave you
meaningful responses too.
moviePig
2018-02-14 15:48:32 UTC
Permalink
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Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then,
one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from
now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who
gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift"
underway. Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more
numerous than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is
gaining market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves
remains to be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before
you decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?
Netflix had the service for what, four or five years before you
even used it?
Yes, I am --by temperament and by philosophy borne of experience --
often a 'late adopter'.  Hint: it's not the same thing as troglodyte
or Luddite.  (Btw, the *earliest* streaming-adopters were pirates...)
Label it how you want but you're late adopting of technology also
seems to concur with a late adopting of the facts.  Thus the constant
dodging and weaving even when approached with similar facts from
dudes that are in no way fans of mine.  (And vice versa.)  I'm not
even pissed anymore because your mule like stubbornness somehow
managed to further the discussion.
If you have important 'facts' here that you think I'm not cognizant
of, then I'm all ears.  But asserting that Netflix has, or will soon
have, turned the movie industry upside down seems a bit overeager.
Originally you claimed Neflix was some kind of "outsider" and I showed
you an article from last year that they've exceeded the entire number of
cable subscribers.  You didn't acknowledge that fact, and the whole time
have stated your poorly formed opinions as fact or as in some way
meaningful.  If you choose to stay ignorant on the subject that's your
choice, but if you expect to be taken seriously in a discussion like
this you're sadly mistaken.  You do the same thing every time: you make
people sorry they've engaged you because of your vague, bloated, purple
prose responses.  That's why I don't take these discussions seriously,
because you yourself can't be taken seriously.  Even after people I
don't even real discussions with, Obveeus and "BTR1701" gave you
meaningful responses too.
Yes... originally I claimed Netflix was some kind of 'outsider', in that
people *perceived* of Netflix as the anti-establishment newcomer studio
who perhaps deserved some extra kindness from IMDb raters of its
"fledgling" offerings like tCP. Multiple times, I've noted that that
particular perception has *nothing* to do with actual business facts.
(Nor does tCP's *actual* origin as an ordinary 'establishment' product.)
--
- - - - - - - -
YOUR taste at work...
http://www.moviepig.com
Your Name
2018-02-14 00:15:35 UTC
Permalink
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Post by trotsky
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining market
share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to be seen.
Sure. And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place? Netflix had
the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
I've never used Netflix, nor any other streaming service (including the
free 'OnDemand' services from the Freeview channels here in New
Zealand) ... probably never will.
trotsky
2018-02-14 01:08:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Your Name
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway.
Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining
market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to
be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix
had the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
I've never used Netflix, nor any other streaming service (including the
free 'OnDemand' services from the Freeview channels here in New Zealand)
... probably never will.
Cool. It must've taken you decades to break down and use the internet.
Ed Stasiak
2018-02-14 04:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On 2018-02-13 20:59:39 +0000, trotsky
*snip*
You guys seem to be all hung-up on technology but as Obveeus
pointed out up-thread, studios are keeping theaters alive by using
them primarily for blockbusters as opposed to general movies.

And the demographic most likely to drop the money and deal with
the hassles of going to a theater are teenagers, who don’t really
care what’s up on the screen as long as there are plenty of witty
quips and ‘splosions, as they’re there to hang out with friends,
thus the flood of comic book flicks.
Your Name
2018-02-14 05:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by Your Name
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was that
Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift" underway. Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more numerous
than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is gaining market
share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves remains to be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix had
the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
I've never used Netflix, nor any other streaming service (including the
free 'OnDemand' services from the Freeview channels here in New
Zealand) ... probably never will.
Cool. It must've taken you decades to break down and use the internet.
Until near the middle of last year I was still using a dial-up connection. :-p
The only reason I changed that was because my 20 year old computer
finally died and I had to get a brand new one. :-(
trotsky
2018-02-14 11:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Your Name
Post by Your Name
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Post by moviePig
Sure, some sort of paradigm shift is underway.  But then, one
always is.
Sure.  Name some of the other ones.
Top of my head, I'm just trying to recall how long ago it was
that Scorsese said he'd be making all his movies in 3D from now
on...
Right.  "Paradigm shift" generally isn't synonymous with "Who gives a shit?"
Scorsese (a respected filmmaker) saw a "paradigm shift"
underway.  Ymmv.
My mileage?  I'm posting articles to support what I say.  You're
posting crap.  Don't be intellectually dishonest it doesn't suit you.
In any field, reported active "paradigm-shifts" are far more
numerous than are the actual shifts themselves.  Yeah, Netflix is
gaining market share -- for a while now.  Whether the earth moves
remains to be seen.
Sure.  And how long did it take the Earth to move for you before you
decided to acknowledge streaming video in the first place?  Netflix
had the service for what, four or five years before you even used it?
I've never used Netflix, nor any other streaming service (including
the free 'OnDemand' services from the Freeview channels here in New
Zealand) ... probably never will.
Cool.  It must've taken you decades to break down and use the internet.
Until near the middle of last year I was still using a dial-up
connection.  :-p
The only reason I changed that was because my 20 year old computer
finally died and I had to get a brand new one.  :-(
And I still collect records. Of course, the LP format has survived
while the CD format will be mostly dead by this time next year, so I
guess I made the right call on that one.
rachel
2018-02-11 21:57:20 UTC
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Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing the
big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies?

Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
trotsky
2018-02-12 11:54:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing the
big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies?
Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
They said home video would kill movie theaters. This time it might
happen. Here's the thing: you're producing verbal vomit and I'm talking
about the stuff the actual fucking industry is talking about:

https://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/15/netflix-and-kill-is-streaming-hurting-movie-theaters.html
Post by rachel
Netflix and kill: Is streaming hurting movie theaters?
Published 1:13 AM ET Thu, 15 Sept 2016 Updated 1:43 AM ET Thu, 15 Sept 2016 CNBC.com
11:18 AM ET Wed, 14 Sept 2016 | 03:32
Having transformed how we watch TV, online streaming giants like Netflix have begun to put other parts of the entertainment industry to the test.
rachel
2018-02-12 14:16:57 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing
the big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies?
Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
They said home video would kill movie theaters. This time it might
happen.
They said that last time. Cinemas are still here.
trotsky
2018-02-12 22:31:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated previously
this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing
the big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies?
Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
They said home video would kill movie theaters. This time it might
happen.
They said that last time. Cinemas are still here.
You really aren't able to keep with any of this. Whose sockpuppet did
you say you were?
rachel
2018-02-12 23:58:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing
the big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies?
Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
They said home video would kill movie theaters. This time it might
happen.
They said that last time. Cinemas are still here.
You really aren't able to keep with any of this.
What evidence do you have to support that assertion?
trotsky
2018-02-13 10:26:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Post by rachel
Post by trotsky
Again, I think you're scratching your head, but as I stated
previously this is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies.
Really? Releasing B-movies (and porn) direct to home video bypassing
the big screen is a paradigm shift in the way we watch first run
movies?
Hello, trotsky, it's 1994 calling ...
They said home video would kill movie theaters. This time it might
happen.
They said that last time. Cinemas are still here.
You really aren't able to keep with any of this.
What evidence do you have to support that assertion?
Exactly.
Ed Stasiak
2018-02-11 18:34:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
trotsky
A much better movie than I expected.
It was the opposite for me. I was expecting giant monsters/aliens
and instead got weird unexplained shit happening on a space station
simply for the sake of weirdness, with (like in Cloverfield 2) the only
reference to giant monsters coming at the very end.

The space station stuff should have been the B-plot and minimized,
with the A-plot being giant monsters stomping around and smashing
shit (which is what everybody wants to see).

And just how big was that monster? Because his head was above
the clouds, which would make him at least 2,000 feet tall!

Also; I’m thinking the escape pod returning to Earth was a reference
to the mysterious object we see crashing into the ocean, in the back-
ground of the home movie in Cloverfield 1.
trotsky
2018-02-11 20:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ed Stasiak
trotsky
A much better movie than I expected.
It was the opposite for me. I was expecting giant monsters/aliens
and instead got weird unexplained shit happening on a space station
simply for the sake of weirdness, with (like in Cloverfield 2) the only
reference to giant monsters coming at the very end.
The space station stuff should have been the B-plot and minimized,
with the A-plot being giant monsters stomping around and smashing
shit (which is what everybody wants to see).
And just how big was that monster? Because his head was above
the clouds, which would make him at least 2,000 feet tall!
Also; I’m thinking the escape pod returning to Earth was a reference
to the mysterious object we see crashing into the ocean, in the back-
ground of the home movie in Cloverfield 1.
It's basically the premise of the original Alien, with scary and macabre
things happening to crew members that have nowhere to escape. There was
no reason to expect it to be a monster movie. They are dicking around
with the Cloverfield concept though, making it the weakest attempt at a
movie franchise I've ever seen. Not much different than Abrams taking
seven years to try and figure out what the aptly named "Lost" was about.
Ed Stasiak
2018-02-11 23:14:36 UTC
Permalink
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trotsky
Ed Stasiak
The space station stuff should have been the B-plot and minimized,
with the A-plot being giant monsters stomping around and smashing
shit (which is what everybody wants to see).
It's basically the premise of the original Alien, with scary and macabre
things happening to crew members that have nowhere to escape.
But in “Alien”, what was going on made sense while in “Cloverfield 3”,
nothing makes any sense.

How the hell was the amputated arm crawling around and how did the
arm know the gyroscope was inside the Russian and how the fuck did
the gyroscope end up inside the Russian?! It’s just stupid.
There was no reason to expect it to be a monster movie.
Other then it was called “Cloverfield”.
They are dicking around with the Cloverfield concept though, making
it the weakest attempt at a movie franchise I've ever seen.
You got that right, it’s a straight up marketing scam, with Jar Jar taking
random stories and simply slapping a monster on the end of the flick and
calling it “Cloverfield” (thou "Cloverfield 2" was good).

By the way, I’ve been working on a plot for the next Cloverfield movie, do
you think they’ll go for it?…

“The McCallister family is preparing to spend Christmas in Paris, gathering
at Peter and Kate's home outside of Chicago on the night before their departure.
Peter and Kate's youngest son, eight-year-old Kevin, is being ridiculed by his
siblings and cousins. A fight with his older brother, Buzz, results in Kevin getting
sent to the third floor of the house for punishment, where he wishes that his family
would disappear. During the night, giant monsters attack and in the confusion and
rush to escape the eldritch horror, Kevin is accidentally left behind.”
Your Name
2018-02-12 00:59:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
trotsky
Ed Stasiak
The space station stuff should have been the B-plot and minimized, with
the A-plot being giant monsters stomping around and smashing shit
(which is what everybody wants to see).
It's basically the premise of the original Alien, with scary and
macabre> things happening to crew members that have nowhere to escape.
But in "Alien", what was going on made sense while in "Cloverfield 3",
nothing makes any sense.
Welcome to the world of JarJar Abrams, whose *ONLY* "talent" is making
crap that makes no sense and then running away to leave others to
attempt to clean up the mess.
Ubiquitous
2018-02-12 11:21:31 UTC
Permalink
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Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from the
Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is. Suffice it to say between the
much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix is
well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the release
of first run movies. For eight bucks a month I can watch movies on my
65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want. Truth be told movie
theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore. Now if I can just
get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage...
Who is forging on-topic articles from "trotsky" again?
--
Dems & the media want Trump to be more like Obama, but then he'd
have to audit liberals & wire tap reporters' phones.
Your Name
2018-02-14 20:26:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is. Suffice it to say between
the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix
is well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the
release of first run movies. For eight bucks a month I can watch
movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want. Truth
be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore. Now
if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a "franchise". :-\

J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"

<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>


When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron?? :-\
Dimensional Traveler
2018-02-14 21:03:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Your Name
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it
was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These
movies always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too
much garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say
between the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious
TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing itself as a major
player in the release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I
can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I
want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me
anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data
usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a
"franchise".  :-\
   J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron??  :-\
You are assuming there is anyone in Hollywood intelligent enough to be
capable of realizing that.
--
Inquiring minds want to know while minds with a self-preservation
instinct are running screaming.
trotsky
2018-02-14 22:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Your Name
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good,
the cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production
was good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little
from the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship
it was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These
movies always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too
much garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say
between the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious
TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing itself as a major
player in the release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I
can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I
want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for
me anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my
data usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a
"franchise".  :-\
    J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron??  :-\
You are assuming there is anyone in Hollywood intelligent enough to be
capable of realizing that.
Somebody's lacking in intelligence but it isn't Hollywood.
Your Name
2018-02-15 01:10:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Dimensional Traveler
A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say between
the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix
is well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the
release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I can watch
movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want.  Truth
be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore.  Now
if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a "franchise".  :-\
   J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron??  :-\
You are assuming there is anyone in Hollywood intelligent enough to be
capable of realizing that.
True. When the place in infested with talentless morons and hacks, they
probably don't notice yet another one. :-(

I guess the real question should be: why does *anyone* actually pay to
see the drivel JarJar Abrams' make?
The Starmaker
2018-02-16 06:54:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Your Name
Post by Dimensional Traveler
Post by Your Name
Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is. Suffice it to say between
the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix
is well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the
release of first run movies. For eight bucks a month I can watch
movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want. Truth
be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore. Now
if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a "franchise". :-\
J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron?? :-\
You are assuming there is anyone in Hollywood intelligent enough to be
capable of realizing that.
True. When the place in infested with talentless morons and hacks, they
probably don't notice yet another one. :-(
I guess the real question should be: why does *anyone* actually pay to
see the drivel JarJar Abrams' make?
Have you ever looked at those people who go to movie theaters? Ask them
why don't they download it instead and watch their reaction....

trotsky
2018-02-14 22:57:20 UTC
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A much better movie than I expected.  The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good.  The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it
was mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times.  These
movies always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too
much garden variety thriller, but there it is.  Suffice it to say
between the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious
TCP, Netflix is well on its way to establishing itself as a major
player in the release of first run movies.  For eight bucks a month I
can watch movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I
want.  Truth be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me
anymore.  Now if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data
usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a
"franchise".  :-\
   J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron??  :-\
Hollywood is a business and he's returning gobs of returns on
investments. When is *anyone* going to realize businesses exist to make
money?
The Starmaker
2018-02-16 06:50:01 UTC
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Post by trotsky
A much better movie than I expected. The directing was very good, the
cast was good, even if mostly unrecognizable, and the production was
good. The script was not groundbreaking, and borrowed a little from
the Alien franchise, but when stuff went awry on their spaceship it was
mostly unpredictable and even a little creepy at times. These movies
always seem to suffer from too little science fiction and too much
garden variety thriller, but there it is. Suffice it to say between
the much more high profile "Bright" and the less ambitious TCP, Netflix
is well on its way to establishing itself as a major player in the
release of first run movies. For eight bucks a month I can watch
movies on my 65 inch screen and stop for breaks anytime I want. Truth
be told movie theaters don't have that much appeal for me anymore. Now
if I can just get my ISP to stop screwing me on my data usage.
Good grief ... there's another movie in this train crash of a "franchise". :-\
J.J. Abrams says Cloverfield 4, 'Overlord', is a "crazy movie"
<http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/922771-j-j-abrams-says-cloverfield-4-overlord-is-a-crazy-movie>
When is *anyone* in Hollyweird going to realise that JarJar Abrams is
just an over-egoed, over-hyped, talentless moron?? :-\
But all his people are the same way...
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