Discussion:
Diahann Carroll has died at 84
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Robin Miller
2019-10-04 19:33:35 UTC
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https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.html
Horace LaBadie
2019-10-04 20:02:21 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.ht
ml
She deserved a better career.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-04 22:39:38 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.

Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.

I suppose I watched something she did in between but cannot recall.
A Friend
2019-10-05 03:10:09 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-16103605
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.

"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.

The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
anim8rfsk
2019-10-05 05:22:03 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036
05
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
That's that show with the actress I was friends with until I cited a review
that called a friend of hers 'conventionally beautiful' right?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
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Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-05 05:41:33 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
05
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
That's that show with the actress I was friends with until I cited a review
that called a friend of hers 'conventionally beautiful' right?
Only in season 1. She might as well leave it off her resume. It's
memorable only that she was brought in for specious reasons and fired
for something that wasn't her fault.
anim8rfsk
2019-10-05 05:49:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
05
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
That's that show with the actress I was friends with until I cited a review
that called a friend of hers 'conventionally beautiful' right?
Only in season 1. She might as well leave it off her resume. It's
memorable only that she was brought in for specious reasons and fired
for something that wasn't her fault.
She was brought in because somebody didn't like Marsha, right? How can you
not like Marsha?
Although on NCIS-LA-JAG she keeps forgetting to do her nasal twang 'merican
accent and so what continent she comes from changes scene to scene.
--
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Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-05 06:21:56 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
05
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
That's that show with the actress I was friends with until I cited a review
that called a friend of hers 'conventionally beautiful' right?
Only in season 1. She might as well leave it off her resume. It's
memorable only that she was brought in for specious reasons and fired
for something that wasn't her fault.
She was brought in because somebody didn't like Marsha, right? How can you
not like Marsha?
No. Her character was established as a lesbian. If I recall the pilot,
she was in a civil union (probably too early to be a marriage) with
another woman. Producers got a note from the network about the character
after the show wsa ordered to series.

Natalie was used mainly in the conference room scenes to ask obvious
questions to move the plot along. We almost never saw Lauren Cruz in the
field. It was a one-dimensional character. As she was in the main cast,
producers were daring the network to give them another note about how
much they hated Lauren Cruz and Natalie's option was not to be picked up for
season 2.

It was a deliberately terrible character to force the network to allow
them to bring Marshia back. It wasn't fair to Natalie that she was being
used, but who knows if anyone else offered her a show that season.
Post by anim8rfsk
Although on NCIS-LA-JAG she keeps forgetting to do her nasal twang 'merican
accent and so what continent she comes from changes scene to scene.
anim8rfsk
2019-10-05 07:35:08 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
05
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
That's that show with the actress I was friends with until I cited a review
that called a friend of hers 'conventionally beautiful' right?
Only in season 1. She might as well leave it off her resume. It's
memorable only that she was brought in for specious reasons and fired
for something that wasn't her fault.
She was brought in because somebody didn't like Marsha, right? How can you
not like Marsha?
No. Her character was established as a lesbian. If I recall the pilot,
she was in a civil union (probably too early to be a marriage) with
another woman. Producers got a note from the network about the character
after the show wsa ordered to series.
Natalie was used mainly in the conference room scenes to ask obvious
questions to move the plot along. We almost never saw Lauren Cruz in the
field. It was a one-dimensional character. As she was in the main cast,
producers were daring the network to give them another note about how
much they hated Lauren Cruz and Natalie's option was not to be picked up for
season 2.
It was a deliberately terrible character to force the network to allow
them to bring Marshia back. It wasn't fair to Natalie that she was being
used, but who knows if anyone else offered her a show that season.
And maybe she liked spending some time in NYC.

Yeah, I remember now, we almost never saw her outdoors. She'd be in the
surveillance van, or on a donut run. I remember her running after a perp in
broad daylight once and that was about it.

And we certainly never saw her with Hi-Ho Daddario. Be still, my beating
heart!
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Although on NCIS-LA-JAG she keeps forgetting to do her nasal twang 'merican
accent and so what continent she comes from changes scene to scene.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-05 05:40:13 UTC
Reply
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Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I agree with you. It didn't seem all that different than anything else
from that era. Tv took itself very very seriously. There was a lot of
very sincere drama in response to a crisis that wasn't all that big a
deal.
Post by A Friend
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
I didn't know. I always wondered about that.
Post by A Friend
The only real criticism of JULIA I remember hearing was that her white
neighbors were portrayed as one-dimensional dolts. Of course, this had
never been done on TV before.
Cardboard characters? Hahahahahahaha
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Her recurring character on White Collar was fun on most episodes.
Yes! There was also the joke about how they should have added a credit
that read "Frequently Starring Diahann Carroll," which just goes to
show that old jokes are not necessarily the best jokes.
Oh well.
anim8rfsk
2019-10-05 05:48:12 UTC
Reply
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Diahann Carroll has died at 84
October 4, 2019 at 10:40:13 PM MST
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-16103
6057.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I agree with you. It didn't seem all that different than anything else
from that era. Tv took itself very very seriously. There was a lot of
very sincere drama in response to a crisis that wasn't all that big a
deal.
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work with
$50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
--
Join your old RAT friends at
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A Friend
2019-10-05 11:37:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Robin Miller
Diahann Carroll has died at 84
October 4, 2019 at 10:40:13 PM MST
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-16103
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
6057.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I agree with you. It didn't seem all that different than anything else
from that era. Tv took itself very very seriously. There was a lot of
very sincere drama in response to a crisis that wasn't all that big a
deal.
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work with
$50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
anim8rfsk
2019-10-05 16:10:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Robin Miller
Diahann Carroll has died at 84
October 4, 2019 at 10:40:13 PM MST
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-16103
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
6057.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I agree with you. It didn't seem all that different than anything else
from that era. Tv took itself very very seriously. There was a lot of
very sincere drama in response to a crisis that wasn't all that big a
deal.
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work with
$50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
hee hee
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2019-10-08 22:08:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by anim8rfsk
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work with
$50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
The MAD magazine parodies were very good in those days.

I think the magazine has gone out of business.
A Friend
2019-10-09 02:41:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Post by A Friend
Post by anim8rfsk
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work with
$50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
The MAD magazine parodies were very good in those days.
I think the magazine has gone out of business.
No, it hasn't. It might in a year or three, but not now.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-09 04:47:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Post by A Friend
Post by anim8rfsk
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work
with $50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
The MAD magazine parodies were very good in those days.
I think the magazine has gone out of business.
No, it hasn't. It might in a year or three, but not now.
We discussed this months ago when the news came out.

They're already out of business. They're selling reprint issues through
comic book stores and via subscription; news stand sales have ceased.
They're still doing year-end specials with new content.

It's dead. Alfred E. Neuman really does have reason to worry.
A Friend
2019-10-09 11:41:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by A Friend
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Post by A Friend
Post by anim8rfsk
I recall some parody of it at the time - must have been MAD Magazine -
pointing out that this poor impoverished widow woman was seeking work
with $50,000 worth of designer gowns in her closet. :D
IIRC they also had her kid out in the middle of a highway with a big
sign that read PLEASE MARRY MY MOTHER!
The MAD magazine parodies were very good in those days.
I think the magazine has gone out of business.
No, it hasn't. It might in a year or three, but not now.
We discussed this months ago when the news came out.
They're already out of business. They're selling reprint issues through
comic book stores and via subscription; news stand sales have ceased.
They're still doing year-end specials with new content.
It's dead. Alfred E. Neuman really does have reason to worry.
I won't argue that it's not dead, but its unbreathing corpse is still
lumbering around the countryside.

h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2019-10-08 22:06:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-16103605
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I have to disagree. Yes, NBC really hyped it a lot, perhaps
going overboard. But back then society was still segregated
and the idea of a black lead on TV was groundbreaking, even
if it was a silly sitcom.

Not everybody was for it. Plenty of folks back then felt
blacks belonged only in the back.
Post by A Friend
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
I never knew him, but after Julia I noticed whenever he was
in an old movie on TCM. He had a long career.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Nolan
A Friend
2019-10-09 02:41:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Post by A Friend
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-
16103605
7.html
She deserved a better career.
I've seen a few episodes of Julia. It was decent enough, clearly of its
era. It was more of a drama than a comedy.
JULIA was supposed to be a very big deal when it first ran, but I was
there, and it really wasn't. TV was, as usual, behind the
social-reform wave. There was nothing that seemed weird about a black
woman headlining a TV series in 1968. The fact didn't seem unusual or
bizarre in any way, even though it was (almost) the first time it had
ever happened.
I have to disagree. Yes, NBC really hyped it a lot, perhaps
going overboard. But back then society was still segregated
and the idea of a black lead on TV was groundbreaking, even
if it was a silly sitcom.
Bill Cosby had been a black co-lead for several years by then.
Networks were still nervous about the reaction of southern affiliates
to JULIA. They said so, anyway, but what they were really afraid of
was the reaction of southern station owners. It's often been pointed
out that station owners have the souls of particularly crooked used-car
salesmen. The public, generally speaking, was fine with JULIA.
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Not everybody was for it. Plenty of folks back then felt
blacks belonged only in the back.
Not much has changed for some people. BTW I didn't say everybody was
for it. I said that it really wasn't all that big a deal. By the time
JULIA was on the air, the battle was over.
Post by h***@bbs.cpcn.com
Post by A Friend
"Frequently starring Lloyd Nolan." The unusual credit attracted both
attention and jokes. BTW Lloyd Nolan shouted all his lines because
he'd gone deaf.
I never knew him, but after Julia I noticed whenever he was
in an old movie on TCM. He had a long career.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lloyd_Nolan
moviePig
2019-10-04 21:06:03 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.html
Iirc, she took pride in her 'Dynasty' role, as "TV's first black bitch".
--
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h***@bbs.cpcn.com
2019-10-04 21:13:57 UTC
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Post by Robin Miller
https://news.yahoo.com/diahann-carroll-oscar-nominated-pioneering-161036057.html
They made a really big deal when her show, Julia, premiered.
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