Discussion:
Game Show Host Jim Perry Dies at 82
(too old to reply)
A Friend
2015-11-21 05:16:55 UTC
Permalink
From alt.obituaries (h/t Diner). BTW I initially typoed the header as
Game Show Ghost Jim Perry. I should have left it alone.



http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/jim-perry-dead-game-show-842603

Jim Perry, Top Game Show Host in the 1970s and '80s, Dies at 82

by Mike Barnes 11/20/2015 5:49pm PST

Jim Perry, who hosted the popular NBC game shows Card Sharks and Sale
of the Century in the 1970s and '80s, has died. He was 82.

Perry died Friday in Oregon after a five-year battle with cancer, WME
announced.

In 1978, the dapper Perry started as host of Card Sharks, beginning his
long-standing relationship with NBC. He hosted a version of the game
show and the two pilots that preceded it from April 24, 1978, until
Oct. 23, 1981.

NBC then named Perry as the host of a revamped edition of Sale of the
Century in 1982. That show aired for six years and spun off into a
nightly syndicated version, which saw Perry doing double-duty as the
host of both shows.

Card Sharks, from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions, was based on
the card game Acey Deucey and featured huge, oversized playing cards
handled by attractive female assistants. The new version of Sale of the
Century, from Reg Grundy Productions, had contestants participating in
a shopping game.

Born in Camden, N.J., Perry was a star basketball player who went on to
attend the University of Pennsylvania. After graduation, he joined the
Special Services, where he worked on Armed Forces Radio during the
Korean War.

After the war, the 6-foot-4 Perry teamed with legendary comedian Sid
Caesar, and they toured together for several years, including a
three-year stint in Las Vegas.

He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.

In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.

Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.

Survivors include his wife of 56 years, June, a former model; their
children Sean and Erin; and three grandchildren.

"Today we lost the greatest father, friend and husband anybody could
ever wish for," the family said in a statement. "While he provided
decades of entertainment to millions of people, his greatest victory
was his growth as a human being -- rising from a childhood filled with
challenges including great poverty to provide an amazing life for his
family. The world is a better place for his having been here."

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in his
name to a local hospice provider or cancer charity.
Rhino
2015-11-21 13:45:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by A Friend
From alt.obituaries (h/t Diner). BTW I initially typoed the header as
Game Show Ghost Jim Perry. I should have left it alone.
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/jim-perry-dead-game-show-842603
Jim Perry, Top Game Show Host in the 1970s and '80s, Dies at 82
by Mike Barnes 11/20/2015 5:49pm PST
Jim Perry, who hosted the popular NBC game shows Card Sharks and Sale
of the Century in the 1970s and '80s, has died. He was 82.
Perry died Friday in Oregon after a five-year battle with cancer, WME
announced.
In 1978, the dapper Perry started as host of Card Sharks, beginning his
long-standing relationship with NBC. He hosted a version of the game
show and the two pilots that preceded it from April 24, 1978, until
Oct. 23, 1981.
NBC then named Perry as the host of a revamped edition of Sale of the
Century in 1982. That show aired for six years and spun off into a
nightly syndicated version, which saw Perry doing double-duty as the
host of both shows.
Card Sharks, from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions, was based on
the card game Acey Deucey and featured huge, oversized playing cards
handled by attractive female assistants. The new version of Sale of the
Century, from Reg Grundy Productions, had contestants participating in
a shopping game.
Born in Camden, N.J., Perry was a star basketball player who went on to
attend the University of Pennsylvania. After graduation, he joined the
Special Services, where he worked on Armed Forces Radio during the
Korean War.
After the war, the 6-foot-4 Perry teamed with legendary comedian Sid
Caesar, and they toured together for several years, including a
three-year stint in Las Vegas.
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
Survivors include his wife of 56 years, June, a former model; their
children Sean and Erin; and three grandchildren.
"Today we lost the greatest father, friend and husband anybody could
ever wish for," the family said in a statement. "While he provided
decades of entertainment to millions of people, his greatest victory
was his growth as a human being -- rising from a childhood filled with
challenges including great poverty to provide an amazing life for his
family. The world is a better place for his having been here."
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in his
name to a local hospice provider or cancer charity.
Jim Perry was a fixture on Canadian television for so many years that I
just assumed he was Canadian. This is the first time I've heard that he
was actually American.
--
Rhino
Michael Black
2015-11-21 15:25:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is a
really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here. I
think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.

It was the time of relatively minor prizes.

I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the Toronto
Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of thing he'd
do.

Michael
Rhino
2015-11-21 16:57:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is
a really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here.
I think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
That's the truth! I still remember one show where the grand prize for
having top score of the day was a TOASTER! The American shows were
awarding new cars and TVs and the like (in those days) while all we
could manage was a lowly toaster.
Post by Michael Black
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the
Toronto Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of
thing he'd do.
Yes, it does. I don't remember for certain if he actually hosted the
parade but I *think* he did.

I wonder if he acquired Canadian citizenship along the way? Now that I
know he was American, I find myself wondering whether he even lived
here. Maybe the taping of the shows was arranged so he could do them all
in the space of a few weeks each year and fly up from Boston or wherever
just to do the work.
--
Rhino
Michael Black
2015-11-21 17:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is
a really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here.
I think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
That's the truth! I still remember one show where the grand prize for having
top score of the day was a TOASTER! The American shows were awarding new cars
and TVs and the like (in those days) while all we could manage was a lowly
toaster.
I can't even remember the prizes, but I do recall the voiceover at the end
of each show telling us that audience members would receive a can of dog
food or something like that. But mostly it was sponsor stuff, minor
things.
Post by Michael Black
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the
Toronto Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of
thing he'd do.
Yes, it does. I don't remember for certain if he actually hosted the parade
but I *think* he did.
I'm not sure either, but once I read the part about the beauty pageant, I
suddenly thought he got roped into other things, and the Santa Claus
parade sounds like it would.
I wonder if he acquired Canadian citizenship along the way? Now that I know
he was American, I find myself wondering whether he even lived here. Maybe
the taping of the shows was arranged so he could do them all in the space of
a few weeks each year and fly up from Boston or wherever just to do the work.
Wikipedia (I checked because I really had thought he was Canadian) says he
got Canadian citizenship, but never gave up his US citizenship, so a dual
citizen. He apparently only lived in Canada in the seventies, bringing
his family, then as things took off in the US, he commuted to Canada to
continue his work here.

WHen it's the reverse, Canadians doing well in the US, we usually know
quite well that they are Canadian, but here it just seemed we assumed he
was.

He's not the only one who came to Canada, but the others seemed to make a
full move here. "Mr. Dressup" was born in the US, though he only got his
citzenship in 1994. Bob Homme, "The Friendly Giant", likewise was born in
the US and moved to Canada. Again he got his citizenship in the nineties.
So I think he stayed in Canada, even after the show went off the air.

Michael
Rhino
2015-11-21 19:19:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Black
Post by Rhino
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is
a really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here.
I think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
That's the truth! I still remember one show where the grand prize for
having top score of the day was a TOASTER! The American shows were
awarding new cars and TVs and the like (in those days) while all we
could manage was a lowly toaster.
I can't even remember the prizes, but I do recall the voiceover at the
end of each show telling us that audience members would receive a can of
dog food or something like that. But mostly it was sponsor stuff, minor
things.
Post by Rhino
Post by Michael Black
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the
Toronto Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of
thing he'd do.
Yes, it does. I don't remember for certain if he actually hosted the
parade but I *think* he did.
I'm not sure either, but once I read the part about the beauty pageant,
I suddenly thought he got roped into other things, and the Santa Claus
parade sounds like it would.
Post by Rhino
I wonder if he acquired Canadian citizenship along the way? Now that I
know he was American, I find myself wondering whether he even lived
here. Maybe the taping of the shows was arranged so he could do them
all in the space of a few weeks each year and fly up from Boston or
wherever just to do the work.
Wikipedia (I checked because I really had thought he was Canadian) says
he got Canadian citizenship, but never gave up his US citizenship, so a
dual citizen. He apparently only lived in Canada in the seventies,
bringing his family, then as things took off in the US, he commuted to
Canada to continue his work here.
WHen it's the reverse, Canadians doing well in the US, we usually know
quite well that they are Canadian, but here it just seemed we assumed he
was.
He's not the only one who came to Canada, but the others seemed to make
a full move here. "Mr. Dressup" was born in the US, though he only got
his citzenship in 1994. Bob Homme, "The Friendly Giant", likewise was
born in the US and moved to Canada. Again he got his citizenship in the
nineties. So I think he stayed in Canada, even after the show went off
the air.
It's probably not anything a Canadian nationalist would want to hear but
I suspect that in the earliest days of broadcasting, including early TV
broadcasting (where early is defined as the 50s and 60s), we didn't know
much about it and KNEW we didn't know much about it and had no real
hesitation in importing foreign talent to show us how things are done.
If I were a financial backer of a young CTV for example, I think I'd
push Murray Cherkover and the other senior management of the company to
get people from the US or Britain if necessary in order that we at least
LOOKED professional on air, at least until we could grow our own
professional-looking people.

I suspect all the countries except for the earliest adopters went
through this too. For example, I read that Nepal didn't start TV
broadcasting until 1980. When they were finally ready to start, I don't
imagine they had much of their own local talent so they probably either
imported foreigners to help them get up to speed or they sent people
abroad to study for a few years until they'd learned what they needed.
--
Rhino
Michael Black
2015-11-22 01:49:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Black
Post by Rhino
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is
a really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here.
I think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
That's the truth! I still remember one show where the grand prize for
having top score of the day was a TOASTER! The American shows were
awarding new cars and TVs and the like (in those days) while all we
could manage was a lowly toaster.
I can't even remember the prizes, but I do recall the voiceover at the
end of each show telling us that audience members would receive a can of
dog food or something like that. But mostly it was sponsor stuff, minor
things.
Post by Rhino
Post by Michael Black
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the
Toronto Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of
thing he'd do.
Yes, it does. I don't remember for certain if he actually hosted the
parade but I *think* he did.
I'm not sure either, but once I read the part about the beauty pageant,
I suddenly thought he got roped into other things, and the Santa Claus
parade sounds like it would.
Post by Rhino
I wonder if he acquired Canadian citizenship along the way? Now that I
know he was American, I find myself wondering whether he even lived
here. Maybe the taping of the shows was arranged so he could do them
all in the space of a few weeks each year and fly up from Boston or
wherever just to do the work.
Wikipedia (I checked because I really had thought he was Canadian) says
he got Canadian citizenship, but never gave up his US citizenship, so a
dual citizen. He apparently only lived in Canada in the seventies,
bringing his family, then as things took off in the US, he commuted to
Canada to continue his work here.
WHen it's the reverse, Canadians doing well in the US, we usually know
quite well that they are Canadian, but here it just seemed we assumed he
was.
He's not the only one who came to Canada, but the others seemed to make
a full move here. "Mr. Dressup" was born in the US, though he only got
his citzenship in 1994. Bob Homme, "The Friendly Giant", likewise was
born in the US and moved to Canada. Again he got his citizenship in the
nineties. So I think he stayed in Canada, even after the show went off
the air.
It's probably not anything a Canadian nationalist would want to hear but I
suspect that in the earliest days of broadcasting, including early TV
broadcasting (where early is defined as the 50s and 60s), we didn't know much
about it and KNEW we didn't know much about it and had no real hesitation in
importing foreign talent to show us how things are done. If I were a
financial backer of a young CTV for example, I think I'd push Murray
Cherkover and the other senior management of the company to get people from
the US or Britain if necessary in order that we at least LOOKED professional
on air, at least until we could grow our own professional-looking people.
YOu said that before about early Canadian tv, but we had the National Film
Board that apparently helped make sure early Canadian tv was better than
you imagine. I think budgets was an issue, a smaller population and thus
less money to make episodes. Even today that's an issue.

But there are classic shows from the early days. Razzle Dazzle, The
FOrest Rangers, there was a show or two with Gordon Pinsent. Of course I
was viewing it as a child so maybe missed things, but a lot of it seemed
fairly good. ON the other hand, in the seventies, there seemed to be
fairly bad shows being made, though I think partly budgetary reasons.

TV didn't start that much later in Canada than in the US, and of course
one can learn from watching, so somebody must have gained something from
watching US tv.

Michael
A Friend
2015-11-21 18:59:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is a
really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here. I
think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the Toronto
Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of thing he'd
do.
My all-time favorite Canadian game show is BUMPER STUMPERS. Geoff
Edwards was the host, and he was the only good thing about it.
Contestants had to translate vanity license plates into English --
AVI8TOR into "aviator," for a shallow example. The show looked like it
cost $1.89 (Canadian) to produce, but that was part of its charm.
Rhino
2015-11-21 19:23:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Michael Black
Post by A Friend
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
I thought you were going to tell us he was born in Canada, because he is a
really familiar name. Obviously the game shows that were made here. I
think "It's Your Move" was made right here in Montreal, at one point
there was a lot of tv production facilities here.
It was the time of relatively minor prizes.
I think he might have even did announcing for the telecast of the Toronto
Santa Claus Parade; I'm not sure but it seems like the sort of thing he'd
do.
My all-time favorite Canadian game show is BUMPER STUMPERS. Geoff
Edwards was the host, and he was the only good thing about it.
Contestants had to translate vanity license plates into English --
AVI8TOR into "aviator," for a shallow example. The show looked like it
cost $1.89 (Canadian) to produce, but that was part of its charm.
Are you the guy from New Zealand? If so, I'm surprised they'd export one
of our cheesy game shows so far away. When did they broadcast it? 4 AM,
just before they put the test pattern on? ;-)

As for Geoff Edwards, I think he soon went to the US and hosted bigger
shows there. I don't know anything about him though. Maybe he's another
American who used Canada to get some credentials so that he could do
bigger and better things in the US.
--
Rhino
A Friend
2015-11-21 20:29:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rhino
Post by A Friend
My all-time favorite Canadian game show is BUMPER STUMPERS. Geoff
Edwards was the host, and he was the only good thing about it.
Contestants had to translate vanity license plates into English --
AVI8TOR into "aviator," for a shallow example. The show looked like it
cost $1.89 (Canadian) to produce, but that was part of its charm.
Are you the guy from New Zealand?
Ha! No, I'm in the U.S. of A. BUMPER STUMPERS was part of USA
Network's pathetic morning schedule back in its earlier days. USA
co-produced BUMPER STUMPERS with Global.
Post by Rhino
As for Geoff Edwards, I think he soon went to the US and hosted bigger
shows there. I don't know anything about him though. Maybe he's another
American who used Canada to get some credentials so that he could do
bigger and better things in the US.
Geoff Edwards was born in New Jersey. He was a very big deal in Los
Angeles radio, and from there he branched out to TV in the U.S. and
Canada. (I was particularly fond of JACKPOT!, which I'd watch while
skipping college classes.) I think the Canadians used Edwards because,
really, he was the best there was when it came to hosting game shows.
He even made BUMPER STUMPERS tolerable. Edwards died last year at the
age of 83.

Wikipedia had this summary of U.S.-Canadian game show hosts:

"Edwards was also one of four game show hosts to have emceed a game
show in the United States and another in Canada concurrently (the other
three were Howie Mandel, Alex Trebek and Jim Perry). Edwards, like
Perry, commuted back and forth between California and Canada between
1986 and 1991, hosting The Big Spin and the 1989 revival of Jackpot! in
Sacramento, California and Glendale and the USA Network version of
Chain Reaction in Montreal, Quebec. However, Edwards was required to
have a Canadian co-host on Chain Reaction, due to the fact that he had
no ties to the country, unlike Trebek, Mandel and Perry (Trebek and
Mandel are native Canadians; Perry had blood ties to Canada and lived
in Toronto, Ontario during the first several years of Definition). His
commuting days ended after Chain Reaction left the air in 1991."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoff_Edwards
e***@googlemail.com
2018-01-13 16:41:55 UTC
Permalink
You are correct Michael, he hosted the Parade for many years (along with the lottery show, Miss Canada Pageant, Eye Bet, Headline Hunters, Definition and more) . While he was born in the US, his family originally emigrated to Canada from Ireland (during potato famine times) so he felt a great connection to Canada and loved living and working there. Thanks for remembering him well :-) Cheers. Erin Perry
daniel anderson
2015-11-24 21:35:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by A Friend
From alt.obituaries (h/t Diner). BTW I initially typoed the header as
Game Show Ghost Jim Perry. I should have left it alone.
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/jim-perry-dead-game-show-842603
Jim Perry, Top Game Show Host in the 1970s and '80s, Dies at 82
by Mike Barnes 11/20/2015 5:49pm PST
Jim Perry, who hosted the popular NBC game shows Card Sharks and Sale
of the Century in the 1970s and '80s, has died. He was 82.
Perry died Friday in Oregon after a five-year battle with cancer, WME
announced.
In 1978, the dapper Perry started as host of Card Sharks, beginning his
long-standing relationship with NBC. He hosted a version of the game
show and the two pilots that preceded it from April 24, 1978, until
Oct. 23, 1981.
NBC then named Perry as the host of a revamped edition of Sale of the
Century in 1982. That show aired for six years and spun off into a
nightly syndicated version, which saw Perry doing double-duty as the
host of both shows.
Card Sharks, from Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions, was based on
the card game Acey Deucey and featured huge, oversized playing cards
handled by attractive female assistants. The new version of Sale of the
Century, from Reg Grundy Productions, had contestants participating in
a shopping game.
Born in Camden, N.J., Perry was a star basketball player who went on to
attend the University of Pennsylvania. After graduation, he joined the
Special Services, where he worked on Armed Forces Radio during the
Korean War.
After the war, the 6-foot-4 Perry teamed with legendary comedian Sid
Caesar, and they toured together for several years, including a
three-year stint in Las Vegas.
He went on to serve as host of the Miss Canada Pageant, which he emceed
from 1967-90, and served as the announcer on 1969's syndicated program
That Show, starring Joan Rivers. From 1969-72, he did the weekend
overnight shift as a DJ at WABC Radio in New York.
In 1974, Perry became the host of the CTV game show Headline Hunters,
which aired from 1972-83. In the midst of his duties there, Perry began
hosting the Canadian network's Definition, which ran until 1989 as the
longest-running game show in Canadian TV history.
Perry's first major American network hosting job came in 1967 with It's
Your Move, which was produced in Canada for syndication in the U.S.
Survivors include his wife of 56 years, June, a former model; their
children Sean and Erin; and three grandchildren.
"Today we lost the greatest father, friend and husband anybody could
ever wish for," the family said in a statement. "While he provided
decades of entertainment to millions of people, his greatest victory
was his growth as a human being -- rising from a childhood filled with
challenges including great poverty to provide an amazing life for his
family. The world is a better place for his having been here."
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in his
name to a local hospice provider or cancer charity.
I used to watch "Sale Of The Century"-it along with "Wheel" or "Scrabble"(with Chuck Woolery-and the soap "Santa Barbara" were the only non ABC daytime shows i watched back then(my Mom was a ABC soap fan-although I did watch "Days Of Our Lives" sometimes instead of "All My Children")
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