Discussion:
CNN: Didn't want to pay rent, so he decapitates his landlord
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RichA
2020-08-01 01:29:06 UTC
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https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Your Name
2020-08-01 02:30:45 UTC
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Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
FPP
2020-08-01 03:40:06 UTC
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Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
People who decide to rent out their property aren't entitled to make a
living at it?
Why? They're not a charity.
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
BTR1701
2020-08-01 05:11:55 UTC
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Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?

Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and then
you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
RichA
2020-08-01 05:56:41 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and then
you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks." He was an ardent communist who acted as an agent to the Russians and was charged with espionage. While he was in prison for 20 years, his Hampstead Heath London house rose in value to $3M. But he still maintained that "housing should be held in trust by the state for those who need it." Though he wasn't inclined to give up his place.
Your Name
2020-08-01 06:29:08 UTC
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Post by RichA
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost>
Post by RichA
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make>
money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and
then> you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks." He was an ardent
communist who acted as an agent to the Russians and was charged with
espionage. While he was in prison for 20 years, his Hampstead Heath
London house rose in value to $3M. But he still maintained that
"housing should be held in trust by the state for those who need it."
Though he wasn't inclined to give up his place.
I said "many landlords" not "all landlords".
Reading comprehension skills are extremely lacking these days. :-\
BTR1701
2020-08-01 06:42:10 UTC
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Post by Your Name
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make>
money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and
then> you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks." He was an ardent
communist who acted as an agent to the Russians and was charged with
espionage. While he was in prison for 20 years, his Hampstead Heath
London house rose in value to $3M. But he still maintained that
"housing should be held in trust by the state for those who need it."
Though he wasn't inclined to give up his place.
I said "many landlords" not "all landlords".
Still not understanding how charging market rate for rent is 'greedy'.
If you charge above market, you won't get any takers, so whatever people
are willing to pay is what the market will bear.

It's not like this is a monopoly situation, or anything, like the only
cable company in a city that has no competition. It's just the market at
work. You get cities like San Francisco with a lot more people needing
apartments than there is supply and the prices go up. That's just basic
economics. It's not 'greed'.
trotsky
2020-08-01 09:36:05 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make>
money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and
then> you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks." He was an ardent
communist who acted as an agent to the Russians and was charged with
espionage. While he was in prison for 20 years, his Hampstead Heath
London house rose in value to $3M. But he still maintained that
"housing should be held in trust by the state for those who need it."
Though he wasn't inclined to give up his place.
I said "many landlords" not "all landlords".
Still not understanding how charging market rate for rent is 'greedy'.
Fifty five million are unemployed thanks to that fat orange bag of pus
you endorse. These kind of things might make a landlord more lenient
with a tenant. Is the pandemic this confusing for you? Have you tried
anything to help with your mental acuity?
FPP
2020-08-01 12:06:22 UTC
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Post by Your Name
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that
almost> > seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to
make> money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and
then> you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks."  He was an ardent
communist who acted as an agent to the Russians and was charged with
espionage.  While he was in prison for 20 years, his Hampstead Heath
London house rose in value to $3M.  But he still maintained that
"housing should be held in trust by the state for those who need it."
Though he wasn't inclined to give up his place.
I said "many landlords" not "all landlords".
Reading comprehension skills are extremely lacking these days.  :-\
And you proved neither...
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
trotsky
2020-08-01 09:36:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RichA
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and then
you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
Reminds me of the guy in the TV show, "Spooks."
No it doesn't.
trotsky
2020-08-01 09:32:34 UTC
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Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water, how
else would you describe this you fucking moron?
FPP
2020-08-01 12:08:51 UTC
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Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water, how
else would you describe this you fucking moron?
I already pay to drink water now. Well, it's more for the treatment
plant and infrastructure needed to pipe it into my house.

But I don't mind. It's better than crapping out the open window.
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
Ed Stasiak
2020-08-01 17:08:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by FPP
FPP
trotsky
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water,
how else would you describe this you fucking moron?
I already pay to drink water now. Well, it's more for the treatment
plant and infrastructure needed to pipe it into my house.
My water bill is never over $17 per month but then we have our own
treatment plant and don’t have to pay extortion to the city of Detroit,
which gouges the fuck out’a surrounding communities (a co-worker
is shelling out over $100 per month for the same amount of water
in the city next door).

That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the state
pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb asses.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/nestle-ceo-water-not-human-right/

“Water is, of course, the most important raw material we have today in
the world. It’s a question of whether we should privatize the normal water
supply for the population. And there are two different opinions on the
matter. The one opinion, which I think is extreme, is represented by the
NGOs, who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means that
as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme
solution. The other view says that water is a foodstuff like any other,
and like any other foodstuff it should have a market value. Personally,
I believe it’s better to give a foodstuff a value so that we’re all aware
it has its price, and then that one should take specific measures for
the part of the population that has no access to this water, and there
are many different possibilities there.”
RichA
2020-08-01 21:04:50 UTC
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Post by Ed Stasiak
Post by FPP
FPP
trotsky
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water,
how else would you describe this you fucking moron?
I already pay to drink water now. Well, it's more for the treatment
plant and infrastructure needed to pipe it into my house.
My water bill is never over $17 per month but then we have our own
treatment plant and don’t have to pay extortion to the city of Detroit,
which gouges the fuck out’a surrounding communities (a co-worker
is shelling out over $100 per month for the same amount of water
in the city next door).
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the state
pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb asses.
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/nestle-ceo-water-not-human-right/
If they didn't get it for pennies, you'd pay a lot more for processed drinks.

Plus, Great Lake water levels (completely opposite of what the enviroQUEERS predicted of course) are rising, so no threat of water shortages. That will come when liberals force North America to give up its water to the dirty 3rd world.
Ed Stasiak
2020-08-01 23:45:23 UTC
Reply
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Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the state
pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb asses.
If they didn't get it for pennies, you'd pay a lot more for processed drinks.
If Nestle isn’t making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street investors,
then they should get out of the business.

https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-environment-watch/michigan-isnt-alone-most-states-charge-little-water-bottlers-nestle
May 2, 2018

Michigan isn’t alone. Most states charge little for water bottlers like Nestlé

LANSING — Just $5,000 down and $200 per year.

That’s how much Michigan is getting from Nestlé Waters North America Inc. to pump more than 210 million gallons of water per year from one Osceola County well for its Ice Mountain brand. Critics say those rates, set by the state Department of Environmental Quality, are a steal.

But Michigan isn’t alone. Nationwide, longstanding laws allows water bottlers to pump lots of water at little cost.

“It’s totally typical,” said Noah Hall, a professor of environment and water law at Wayne State University. “Whether you’re taking the water for growing crops, building widgets, drinking water or bottling it, we don’t pay.”

Residents and businesses hooked up to municipal water systems pay utility bills, often based upon how much water they use. Nestlé, which has nine wells feeding its Michigan plant, pays $3.50 per thousand gallons it pumps from two of those wells owned by the City of Evart. Last year, that worked out to $313,000, city officials say.

But ratepayers are footing the cost to deliver the water, not the water itself.

Those wanting to tap water from beneath their own land — like where Nestlé wants to ramp up pumping outside of Evart’s water system?

It’s cheap in Michigan and other states that operate under the English Common Law doctrine of “reasonable use” that gives landowners the right to use water on or under their property if it doesn’t interfere with navigability or the rights of others.

Michigan is one of just 18 states that charge fees specifically to water bottling companies, according to information compiled in 2015 by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources — all of which are fixed license fees not per-gallon rates.

Vermont charged the highest annual licensing fee at the time: $1,390.

For other big-time water users, many states charge a permitting fee, typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, according to the Vermont research.

Just a few charge rates based upon how much water is sucked up, but those even those rates aren’t significantly higher.

Using those models, Nestlé’s tab for its Michigan withdrawals would be:

At least $1,200 per year in water-stressed regions in Arizona, which charges $1 to $3 per acre foot (325,851 gallons);
About $20,000 per year in Maine, which charges a base fee of $250 down and a sliding scale of $50 per million gallons pumped;
$12,000 per year in parts of Texas that levy $10 per acre foot.
Nestlé Waters North America churned out $4.5 billion in sales last year from 27 bottling factories for a dozen brands in the U.S. and Canada.

Michigan Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, said he wants to tax companies that bottle water in Michigan. In October, he filed House Bill 5133, which would levy a 5-cent per-gallon tax on those companies — an effort to raise more than $20 million each year from Nestlé alone.

The legislation would earmark that money repairs to roads, bridges and busted water and sewer systems.

The bill is a longshot. It has no cosponsors, and it has yet to draw a hearing, though Lucido said he’s been getting a few calls from curious lawmakers amid the hullabaloo over Nestlé.

Lucido said he’s singling out bottlers over other users because they’re heavily profiting from the water, transporting much of it outside of Michigan and creating plastic bottles that might end up in landfills or as litter.

“We’re letting Nestlé come into our state. They are a Swiss organization, purging water from our aquifers. And they’re putting it in bottles, which is totally different from a farmer, totally different from a golf course, because when it goes into a bottle and leaves the state,” Lucido told Bridge Magazine.

“What is the state’s compelling reason to give away free water?”

Although such fees are rare in the U.S., Lucido said they seem to work in Canada.

Ontario hiked its fees in 2017, charging Nestlé the equivalent of $670,000 each year to take 1.2 million gallons from wells there, according to news reports.

Nestlé says it doesn’t get the water for free in Michigan. In an email to Bridge, the company pointed to the fees it pays Evart to use municipal wells. And in Osceola Township, Nestlé said, it “pays the costs to build and maintain the infrastructure, energy and taxes, like all other Osceola Township businesses who do not rely on the neighboring Evart municipal supply.”

Tim Ladd, the Osceola Township supervisor trying to fight Nestlé’s proposed new pumping, said he likes the concept behind Lucido’s bill.

Hall, the Wayne State professor, said he understands the anger fueling Lucido’s proposal. But Hall — who accuses the DEQ of focusing more on economic development than environmental protection in issuing the Nestlé permit — doesn’t believe taxes on withdrawals would protect watersheds from too much pumping.

“Water is priceless, and you don’t solve the problem that we’re not adequately protecting our water by pricing it at pennies,” he said. “I don’t think the solution is to make the state of Michigan an economic partner in that by collecting fees along the way.”
Your Name
2020-08-02 06:02:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Stasiak
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking>
Post by Ed Stasiak
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the
state> > pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb
asses.>
If they didn't get it for pennies, you'd pay a lot more for processed drinks.
If Nestle isn’t making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street investors,
then they should get out of the business.
https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-environment-watch/michigan-isnt-alone-most-states-charge-little-water-bottlers-nestle
May 2, 2018
Michigan isn’t alone. Most states charge little for water bottlers like Nestlé
LANSING — Just $5,000 down and $200 per year.
That’s how much Michigan is getting from Nestlé Waters North America
Inc. to pump more than 210 million gallons of water per year from one
Osceola County well for its Ice Mountain brand. Critics say those
rates, set by the state Department of Environmental Quality, are a
steal.
But Michigan isn’t alone. Nationwide, longstanding laws allows water
bottlers to pump lots of water at little cost.
“It’s totally typical,” said Noah Hall, a professor of environment and
water law at Wayne State University. “Whether you’re taking the water
for growing crops, building widgets, drinking water or bottling it, we
don’t pay.”
Residents and businesses hooked up to municipal water systems pay
utility bills, often based upon how much water they use. Nestlé, which
has nine wells feeding its Michigan plant, pays $3.50 per thousand
gallons it pumps from two of those wells owned by the City of Evart.
Last year, that worked out to $313,000, city officials say.
But ratepayers are footing the cost to deliver the water, not the water itself.
Those wanting to tap water from beneath their own land — like where
Nestlé wants to ramp up pumping outside of Evart’s water system?
It’s cheap in Michigan and other states that operate under the English
Common Law doctrine of “reasonable use” that gives landowners the right
to use water on or under their property if it doesn’t interfere with
navigability or the rights of others.
Michigan is one of just 18 states that charge fees specifically to
water bottling companies, according to information compiled in 2015 by
the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources — all of which are fixed
license fees not per-gallon rates.
Vermont charged the highest annual licensing fee at the time: $1,390.
For other big-time water users, many states charge a permitting fee,
typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars,
according to the Vermont research.
Just a few charge rates based upon how much water is sucked up, but
those even those rates aren’t significantly higher.
At least $1,200 per year in water-stressed regions in Arizona, which
charges $1 to $3 per acre foot (325,851 gallons);
About $20,000 per year in Maine, which charges a base fee of $250 down
and a sliding scale of $50 per million gallons pumped;
$12,000 per year in parts of Texas that levy $10 per acre foot.
Nestlé Waters North America churned out $4.5 billion in sales last year
from 27 bottling factories for a dozen brands in the U.S. and Canada.
Michigan Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, said he wants to tax
companies that bottle water in Michigan. In October, he filed House
Bill 5133, which would levy a 5-cent per-gallon tax on those companies
— an effort to raise more than $20 million each year from Nestlé alone.
The legislation would earmark that money repairs to roads, bridges and
busted water and sewer systems.
The bill is a longshot. It has no cosponsors, and it has yet to draw a
hearing, though Lucido said he’s been getting a few calls from curious
lawmakers amid the hullabaloo over Nestlé.
Lucido said he’s singling out bottlers over other users because they’re
heavily profiting from the water, transporting much of it outside of
Michigan and creating plastic bottles that might end up in landfills or
as litter.
“We’re letting Nestlé come into our state. They are a Swiss
organization, purging water from our aquifers. And they’re putting it
in bottles, which is totally different from a farmer, totally different
from a golf course, because when it goes into a bottle and leaves the
state,” Lucido told Bridge Magazine.
“What is the state’s compelling reason to give away free water?”
Although such fees are rare in the U.S., Lucido said they seem to work in Canada.
Ontario hiked its fees in 2017, charging Nestlé the equivalent of
$670,000 each year to take 1.2 million gallons from wells there,
according to news reports.
Nestlé says it doesn’t get the water for free in Michigan. In an email
to Bridge, the company pointed to the fees it pays Evart to use
municipal wells. And in Osceola Township, Nestlé said, it “pays the
costs to build and maintain the infrastructure, energy and taxes, like
all other Osceola Township businesses who do not rely on the
neighboring Evart municipal supply.”
Tim Ladd, the Osceola Township supervisor trying to fight Nestlé’s
proposed new pumping, said he likes the concept behind Lucido’s bill.
Hall, the Wayne State professor, said he understands the anger fueling
Lucido’s proposal. But Hall — who accuses the DEQ of focusing more on
economic development than environmental protection in issuing the
Nestlé permit — doesn’t believe taxes on withdrawals would protect
watersheds from too much pumping.
“Water is priceless, and you don’t solve the problem that we’re not
adequately protecting our water by pricing it at pennies,” he said. “I
don’t think the solution is to make the state of Michigan an economic
partner in that by collecting fees along the way.”
It ain't just North America either. Bottled water companies are
draining streams all over New Zealand and paying little (if anything)
for it.

Of course, the real stupidity is that people are willing to pay to buy
a bottle of water. Often it's no different ot what comes out of your
household taps, despite claims on the bottle packaging!
RichA
2020-08-02 07:20:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Your Name
Post by Ed Stasiak
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking>
Post by Ed Stasiak
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the
state> > pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb
asses.>
If they didn't get it for pennies, you'd pay a lot more for processed drinks.
If Nestle isn’t making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street investors,
then they should get out of the business.
https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-environment-watch/michigan-isnt-alone-most-states-charge-little-water-bottlers-nestle
May 2, 2018
Michigan isn’t alone. Most states charge little for water bottlers like Nestlé
LANSING — Just $5,000 down and $200 per year.
That’s how much Michigan is getting from Nestlé Waters North America
Inc. to pump more than 210 million gallons of water per year from one
Osceola County well for its Ice Mountain brand. Critics say those
rates, set by the state Department of Environmental Quality, are a
steal.
But Michigan isn’t alone. Nationwide, longstanding laws allows water
bottlers to pump lots of water at little cost.
“It’s totally typical,” said Noah Hall, a professor of environment and
water law at Wayne State University. “Whether you’re taking the water
for growing crops, building widgets, drinking water or bottling it, we
don’t pay.”
Residents and businesses hooked up to municipal water systems pay
utility bills, often based upon how much water they use. Nestlé, which
has nine wells feeding its Michigan plant, pays $3.50 per thousand
gallons it pumps from two of those wells owned by the City of Evart.
Last year, that worked out to $313,000, city officials say.
But ratepayers are footing the cost to deliver the water, not the water itself.
Those wanting to tap water from beneath their own land — like where
Nestlé wants to ramp up pumping outside of Evart’s water system?
It’s cheap in Michigan and other states that operate under the English
Common Law doctrine of “reasonable use” that gives landowners the right
to use water on or under their property if it doesn’t interfere with
navigability or the rights of others.
Michigan is one of just 18 states that charge fees specifically to
water bottling companies, according to information compiled in 2015 by
the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources — all of which are fixed
license fees not per-gallon rates.
Vermont charged the highest annual licensing fee at the time: $1,390.
For other big-time water users, many states charge a permitting fee,
typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars,
according to the Vermont research.
Just a few charge rates based upon how much water is sucked up, but
those even those rates aren’t significantly higher.
At least $1,200 per year in water-stressed regions in Arizona, which
charges $1 to $3 per acre foot (325,851 gallons);
About $20,000 per year in Maine, which charges a base fee of $250 down
and a sliding scale of $50 per million gallons pumped;
$12,000 per year in parts of Texas that levy $10 per acre foot.
Nestlé Waters North America churned out $4.5 billion in sales last year
from 27 bottling factories for a dozen brands in the U.S. and Canada.
Michigan Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, said he wants to tax
companies that bottle water in Michigan. In October, he filed House
Bill 5133, which would levy a 5-cent per-gallon tax on those companies
— an effort to raise more than $20 million each year from Nestlé alone.
The legislation would earmark that money repairs to roads, bridges and
busted water and sewer systems.
The bill is a longshot. It has no cosponsors, and it has yet to draw a
hearing, though Lucido said he’s been getting a few calls from curious
lawmakers amid the hullabaloo over Nestlé.
Lucido said he’s singling out bottlers over other users because they’re
heavily profiting from the water, transporting much of it outside of
Michigan and creating plastic bottles that might end up in landfills or
as litter.
“We’re letting Nestlé come into our state. They are a Swiss
organization, purging water from our aquifers. And they’re putting it
in bottles, which is totally different from a farmer, totally different
from a golf course, because when it goes into a bottle and leaves the
state,” Lucido told Bridge Magazine.
“What is the state’s compelling reason to give away free water?”
Although such fees are rare in the U.S., Lucido said they seem to work in Canada.
Ontario hiked its fees in 2017, charging Nestlé the equivalent of
$670,000 each year to take 1.2 million gallons from wells there,
according to news reports.
Nestlé says it doesn’t get the water for free in Michigan. In an email
to Bridge, the company pointed to the fees it pays Evart to use
municipal wells. And in Osceola Township, Nestlé said, it “pays the
costs to build and maintain the infrastructure, energy and taxes, like
all other Osceola Township businesses who do not rely on the
neighboring Evart municipal supply.”
Tim Ladd, the Osceola Township supervisor trying to fight Nestlé’s
proposed new pumping, said he likes the concept behind Lucido’s bill.
Hall, the Wayne State professor, said he understands the anger fueling
Lucido’s proposal. But Hall — who accuses the DEQ of focusing more on
economic development than environmental protection in issuing the
Nestlé permit — doesn’t believe taxes on withdrawals would protect
watersheds from too much pumping.
“Water is priceless, and you don’t solve the problem that we’re not
adequately protecting our water by pricing it at pennies,” he said. “I
don’t think the solution is to make the state of Michigan an economic
partner in that by collecting fees along the way.”
It ain't just North America either. Bottled water companies are
draining streams all over New Zealand and paying little (if anything)
for it.
Of course, the real stupidity is that people are willing to pay to buy
a bottle of water. Often it's no different ot what comes out of your
household taps, despite claims on the bottle packaging!
If you pay $0.25 for a bottle, you'll get filtered tap water. If you pay $1.00, you get spring water.
Ed Stasiak
2020-08-02 14:23:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RichA
RichA
Your Name
Of course, the real stupidity is that people are willing to pay to buy
a bottle of water. Often it's no different ot what comes out of your
household taps, despite claims on the bottle packaging!
If you pay $0.25 for a bottle, you'll get filtered tap water. If you pay
$1.00, you get spring water.
Only if it’s specifically labeled “spring water”, otherwise you’re just paying
out the ass for plain old city water out of a tap.

Saw a YouTube vid about some brand of bottled water that was being promoted
in the UK and was making money hand-over-fist, until the media pointed out
that the water was coming from the city’s municipal water system, at which
point everybody stopped buying it.

Of course people just switched to buying some other brand of bottled water,
that also just came out of a city’s municipal water system but then people are
stupid.
RichA
2020-08-02 07:18:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Stasiak
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the state
pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb asses.
If they didn't get it for pennies, you'd pay a lot more for processed drinks.
If Nestle isn’t making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street investors,
then they should get out of the business.
https://www.bridgemi.com/michigan-environment-watch/michigan-isnt-alone-most-states-charge-little-water-bottlers-nestle
May 2, 2018
Michigan isn’t alone. Most states charge little for water bottlers like Nestlé
LANSING — Just $5,000 down and $200 per year.
That’s how much Michigan is getting from Nestlé Waters North America Inc. to pump more than 210 million gallons of water per year from one Osceola County well for its Ice Mountain brand. Critics say those rates, set by the state Department of Environmental Quality, are a steal.
But Michigan isn’t alone. Nationwide, longstanding laws allows water bottlers to pump lots of water at little cost.
“It’s totally typical,” said Noah Hall, a professor of environment and water law at Wayne State University. “Whether you’re taking the water for growing crops, building widgets, drinking water or bottling it, we don’t pay.”
Residents and businesses hooked up to municipal water systems pay utility bills, often based upon how much water they use. Nestlé, which has nine wells feeding its Michigan plant, pays $3.50 per thousand gallons it pumps from two of those wells owned by the City of Evart. Last year, that worked out to $313,000, city officials say.
But ratepayers are footing the cost to deliver the water, not the water itself.
Those wanting to tap water from beneath their own land — like where Nestlé wants to ramp up pumping outside of Evart’s water system?
It’s cheap in Michigan and other states that operate under the English Common Law doctrine of “reasonable use” that gives landowners the right to use water on or under their property if it doesn’t interfere with navigability or the rights of others.
Michigan is one of just 18 states that charge fees specifically to water bottling companies, according to information compiled in 2015 by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources — all of which are fixed license fees not per-gallon rates.
Vermont charged the highest annual licensing fee at the time: $1,390.
For other big-time water users, many states charge a permitting fee, typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars, according to the Vermont research.
Just a few charge rates based upon how much water is sucked up, but those even those rates aren’t significantly higher.
At least $1,200 per year in water-stressed regions in Arizona, which charges $1 to $3 per acre foot (325,851 gallons);
About $20,000 per year in Maine, which charges a base fee of $250 down and a sliding scale of $50 per million gallons pumped;
$12,000 per year in parts of Texas that levy $10 per acre foot.
Nestlé Waters North America churned out $4.5 billion in sales last year from 27 bottling factories for a dozen brands in the U.S. and Canada.
Michigan Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township, said he wants to tax companies that bottle water in Michigan. In October, he filed House Bill 5133, which would levy a 5-cent per-gallon tax on those companies — an effort to raise more than $20 million each year from Nestlé alone.
The legislation would earmark that money repairs to roads, bridges and busted water and sewer systems.
The bill is a longshot. It has no cosponsors, and it has yet to draw a hearing, though Lucido said he’s been getting a few calls from curious lawmakers amid the hullabaloo over Nestlé.
Lucido said he’s singling out bottlers over other users because they’re heavily profiting from the water, transporting much of it outside of Michigan and creating plastic bottles that might end up in landfills or as litter.
“We’re letting Nestlé come into our state. They are a Swiss organization, purging water from our aquifers. And they’re putting it in bottles, which is totally different from a farmer, totally different from a golf course, because when it goes into a bottle and leaves the state,” Lucido told Bridge Magazine.
“What is the state’s compelling reason to give away free water?”
Although such fees are rare in the U.S., Lucido said they seem to work in Canada.
Ontario hiked its fees in 2017, charging Nestlé the equivalent of $670,000 each year to take 1.2 million gallons from wells there, according to news reports.
Nestlé says it doesn’t get the water for free in Michigan. In an email to Bridge, the company pointed to the fees it pays Evart to use municipal wells. And in Osceola Township, Nestlé said, it “pays the costs to build and maintain the infrastructure, energy and taxes, like all other Osceola Township businesses who do not rely on the neighboring Evart municipal supply.”
Tim Ladd, the Osceola Township supervisor trying to fight Nestlé’s proposed new pumping, said he likes the concept behind Lucido’s bill.
Hall, the Wayne State professor, said he understands the anger fueling Lucido’s proposal. But Hall — who accuses the DEQ of focusing more on economic development than environmental protection in issuing the Nestlé permit — doesn’t believe taxes on withdrawals would protect watersheds from too much pumping.
“Water is priceless, and you don’t solve the problem that we’re not adequately protecting our water by pricing it at pennies,” he said. “I don’t think the solution is to make the state of Michigan an economic partner in that by collecting fees along the way.”
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
Ed Stasiak
2020-08-02 14:20:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn’t making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street investors,
then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the end,
the consumer has to pay for the increase.
“Market forces”. If people won’t pay out the nose for bottled water, then the
companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends payed to the
do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the business.

The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as it’s easier
then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden hose as I used to do.
BTR1701
2020-08-02 18:49:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
FPP
2020-08-02 21:18:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
Look, if you can't manage to handle wearing a mask when you go out,
you're not going to survive the Apocalypse. End of story.
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
BTR1701
2020-08-02 22:19:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by FPP
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials,
in the end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
Look, if you can't manage to handle wearing a mask when you go out,
you're not going to survive the Apocalypse. End of story.
Dude, I'd be rockin' a zombie apocalypse at this point. I've got lots of
ammo and my cardio is top notch.


FPP
2020-08-03 06:38:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by FPP
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials,
in the end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
Look, if you can't manage to handle wearing a mask when you go out,
you're not going to survive the Apocalypse. End of story.
Dude, I'd be rockin' a zombie apocalypse at this point. I've got lots of
ammo and my cardio is top notch.
http://youtu.be/RW4ADt4YSy0
If you can't handle wearing a mask for a few minutes, you eat that ammo
long before the zombies get there...
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
trotsky
2020-08-03 13:08:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by FPP
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials,
in the end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
Look, if you can't manage to handle wearing a mask when you go out,
you're not going to survive the Apocalypse. End of story.
Dude, I'd be rockin' a zombie apocalypse at this point. I've got lots of
ammo and my cardio is top notch.
Well anonyshitted!

But, as they say in Hindi: demaar karaab hogiya--the brain has gone bad.
FPP
2020-08-03 14:37:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by FPP
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials,
in the end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
Look, if you can't manage to handle wearing a mask when you go out,
you're not going to survive the Apocalypse.  End of story.
Dude, I'd be rockin' a zombie apocalypse at this point. I've got lots of
ammo and my cardio is top notch.
Well anonyshitted!
But, as they say in Hindi: demaar karaab hogiya--the brain has gone bad.
We just say 'cucuzza'.
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
anim8rfsk
2020-08-02 23:39:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2020-08-03 01:14:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
Why do you put up with evil being inflicted upon you?
anim8rfsk
2020-08-03 03:29:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
Why do you put up with evil being inflicted upon you?
My option being what? Move somewhere and have a water test done first, and
hope nothing changes later?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
shawn
2020-08-03 01:27:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
My local grocery store has one of those machines where you can fill up
2 and 5 gallon bottles for under a $1. It is tap water but they do
have filters in place so it's a bit better than just drinking the tap
water and it's easier to fill up one of those large bottles with the
machine than using your sink's faucet.
anim8rfsk
2020-08-03 03:32:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
My local grocery store has one of those machines where you can fill up
2 and 5 gallon bottles for under a $1. It is tap water but they do
have filters in place so it's a bit better than just drinking the tap
water and it's easier to fill up one of those large bottles with the
machine than using your sink's faucet.
I have a PUR filter on the kitchen sink faucet for cooking.

I live next to the well for the city. They dump so many chemicals in there,
and I'm first in line, that if you fill the bathtub, the bathroom smells like
a community swimming pool that's just been chlorine shocked. I'll take a
shower and wash my clothes in the stuff, but drinking it is contraindicated.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
FPP
2020-08-03 06:39:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by shawn
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by BTR1701
Post by RichA
RichA
Ed Stasiak
If Nestle isn't making enough profit for their do-nothing Wall Street
investors, then they should get out of the business.
No matter how your frame any increases in prices of raw materials, in the
end, the consumer has to pay for the increase.
"Market forces". If people won't pay out the nose for bottled water,
then the companies can either lower the price (and thus the dividends
payed to the do-nothing Wall Street investor class) or get out of the
business.
The only time I ever buy bottled water is for camping/hunting, as
it's easier then filling up a 5-gal plastic jerry-can off the garden
hose as I used to do.
I keep several cases of it in the closet with my MREs and other
emergency supplies. When the earthquake hits or the dead rise to feast
on the flesh of the living, the tap water will likely be... unreliable.
My tap water is undrinkable, so I buy bottled water whenever Safeway has it
on a ridiculously cheap sale, which is every couple of months.
My local grocery store has one of those machines where you can fill up
2 and 5 gallon bottles for under a $1. It is tap water but they do
have filters in place so it's a bit better than just drinking the tap
water and it's easier to fill up one of those large bottles with the
machine than using your sink's faucet.
I have a PUR filter on the kitchen sink faucet for cooking.
I live next to the well for the city. They dump so many chemicals in there,
and I'm first in line, that if you fill the bathtub, the bathroom smells like
a community swimming pool that's just been chlorine shocked. I'll take a
shower and wash my clothes in the stuff, but drinking it is contraindicated.
On the plus side, you'll never get covid...
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
number6
2020-08-02 22:49:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ed Stasiak
Post by FPP
FPP
trotsky
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water,
how else would you describe this you fucking moron?
I already pay to drink water now. Well, it's more for the treatment
plant and infrastructure needed to pipe it into my house.
My water bill is never over $17 per month but then we have our own
treatment plant and don’t have to pay extortion to the city of Detroit,
which gouges the fuck out’a surrounding communities (a co-worker
is shelling out over $100 per month for the same amount of water
in the city next door).
That said, Nestle's CEO is still a bastard, as his company is sucking
water out of Michigan’s (and other state’s) supply and paying the state
pennies for it, while selling it for a huge profit to dumb asses.
He probably is ... but often there are other considerations that taking water out
of an aquifer is necessary ... We were pumping and treating contaminated water
from a chemical plant and initially the state DEP wanted the treated water to be recharged
to the municipal aquifer ...
That was fine with us as sewer costs were high and recharge eliminated that ...
But we pointed out that the water table was so high if we did
what they wanted the pollution would be brought to the surface and merrily go
downstream ... So they actually wound up asking us to even increase the pumping rates
to maintain control ... the sewer authority loved the revenue ... and the DEP was
happy pollution was under control ...
RichA
2020-08-01 21:00:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by FPP
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water, how
else would you describe this you fucking moron?
I already pay to drink water now. Well, it's more for the treatment
plant and infrastructure needed to pipe it into my house.
But I don't mind. It's better than crapping out the open window.
Forgive Trotsky. He's from India where that is normal.
RichA
2020-08-01 20:59:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by trotsky
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Nestle's CEO thinks people should pay if they want to drink water, how
else would you describe this you fucking moron?
People already pay to drink water. That's what water bills cover.
Adam H. Kerman
2020-08-02 09:05:38 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
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Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Because, economically, the house is an asset but the land is land and
the landlord didn't create the value of the location.

What you paid for your land is what it's previous owner believes you are
going to do productively with the property.
Post by BTR1701
Take away that incentive and no one will rent to anyone anymore and then
you'll *really* see a housing crisis.
It's the best way to get the market to build more housing for working
class families in parts of cities that have lacked new housing built in
decades, instead of overbuilding for upper middle class in sprawl.

I read somewhere, I'll never find it again, is that the way the upper
middle class housing market works is that families have to be convinced
to move every few years to absorb the all the new housing. There aren't
growing numbers of people finding themselves newly upper middle class.
BTR1701
2020-08-02 18:51:14 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Because, economically, the house is an asset but the land is land and
the landlord didn't create the value of the location.
What you paid for your land is what it's previous owner believes you are
going to do productively with the property.
How does choosing location wisely make me greedy?
Adam H. Kerman
2020-08-02 18:57:26 UTC
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Post by BTR1701
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by BTR1701
Post by Your Name
Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
Considering the excessive selfish greed of many landlords, that almost
seems appropriate.
Where does this attitude come from that I'm 'greedy' if I want to make
money off an asset that I own?
Because, economically, the house is an asset but the land is land and
the landlord didn't create the value of the location.
What you paid for your land is what it's previous owner believes you are
going to do productively with the property.
How does choosing location wisely make me greedy?
That's your objection? Fine. We're all born that way. I've always agreed
with Michael Douglas on this one.

The point is that land owners tend to lobby government to undertax land
value -- which they didn't create -- and tax all sorts of outrageous
crap so they can keep what they didn't earn.

Why should wages and salaries be taxed? Don't we tell people to work to
support themselves and their own families and not to accept welfare? Why
do we then discourage work with high payroll taxes?
ZZyXX
2020-08-01 04:41:39 UTC
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Post by RichA
https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/31/us/hartford-sword-homicide-trnd/index.html
damn christians
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