Discussion:
What Did You Watch? 2021-10-16 (Saturday)
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suzeeq
2021-10-17 16:35:51 UTC
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soaps: DOOL - Thur's ep. Chad finds out that EJ (and Johnny) have
tricked him on the movie, and blows a gasket. Philip fires Jake, and
Jake warns him that working with Ava is a mistake. Chloe seems to have
had enough with Philip's jealousy. Rafe talks to Nicole (why?!).
To tell her why EJ is unsuitable for her.
Gabi
declares war on Ava, but Ava seems unconcerned... until Gabi reminds her
about Rafe and Nicole!
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-17 18:21:29 UTC
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Lost & Found Music Studios (Netflix) - Ep's #3-8.
Wow - it's amazing how many shows blow their pilot episode(s). (In
this case, the show actually blew its first two episodes!)
But about 3 and a half episodes in, the show suddenly gets
significantly more interesting when they start auditioning for new
admissions into the music program.
American idol was always best in it’s audition phase.
So, what did you watch?
Hey, thanks for asking!
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don’t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it’s final season. 12 O’Clock High is still running the
good ones before Paul Burke ruined it.
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a quarreling
couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James Mason is her
guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For me it continues to
have the problem that I just don’t think Lucy is funny.
Recording later today
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
NCIS Los Angeles - Fukushu
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM’s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it’s going to be gloriously terrible.
Never heard of this before. It sounds interesting. It's airing tonight
so I'll record it. But it's 3 hours long. It *better* be dubbed,
because I'm not reading subtitles.
So, what did you watch?
I watched:


Rushmore (Paramount+) 1998 dramedy written and directed by Wes Anderson.
Jason Schwartzman stars as a poor kid on scholarship to an elite
private high school. He's an overachiever in about a dozen or so
different clubs, but he's also flunking his academic classes. Things
kick off when a new teacher shows up (Olivia Williams) whom Schwartzman
falls in love with. But his attempts to woo her are complicated when
his new friend played by Wes Anderson regular Bill Murray also falls for
her. Things take an interesting twist about halfway through the movie
when Schwartzman is expelled from the private school and attends an
inner city public school. I think I only saw this once when it first
came out. But it held up well enough. I also noticed several subtle
nods to things that would be picked up in later Wes Anderson movies.


The Royal Tenenbaums (blu-ray) 2001 dramedy written and directed by Wes
Anderson. The movie features an all star cast, including Anderson
regular Bill Murray. The plot revolves around a quirky family, the type
you'd find in a movie written and directed by Wes Anderson. I saw this
once when it first came out, then I bought the disc and stuck on a shelf
and forgot about it. It was still in the shrinkwrap. I guess the movie
holds up well enough.


Moonrise Kingdom (Showtime) 2012 dramady written and directed by Wes
Anderson. The movie features an all star cast, including Anderson
regulars Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman. The movie takes place in a
summer camp in 1968. A young boy and girl (played by Kara Hayward who
looks like she could be Anna Kendrick's twin) run off together and have
quirky adventures while meeting quirky characters. The type of quirky
characters you'd expect to find in a movie written and directed by Wes
Anderson. I only saw this once before when it was first in the
theaters, and haven't really thought about it since. I guess it's OK.


SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 18:46:02 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Lost & Found Music Studios (Netflix) - Ep's #3-8.
Wow - it's amazing how many shows blow their pilot episode(s). (In
this case, the show actually blew its first two episodes!)
But about 3 and a half episodes in, the show suddenly gets
significantly more interesting when they start auditioning for new
admissions into the music program.
American idol was always best in it’s audition phase.
So, what did you watch?
Hey, thanks for asking!
Recording later today
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM’s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it’s going to be gloriously terrible.
Never heard of this before. It sounds interesting. It's airing tonight
so I'll record it. But it's 3 hours long. It *better* be dubbed,
because I'm not reading subtitles.
Yeah, not for three hours certainly.

I’ll meet you here tomorrow and we’ll compare notes!


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Adam H. Kerman
2021-10-17 19:25:20 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Rushmore (Paramount+) 1998 dramedy written and directed by Wes Anderson.
I truly despise this movie.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
The Royal Tenenbaums (blu-ray) 2001 dramedy written and directed by Wes
Anderson.
I've never seen it. I suppose I really should.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Moonrise Kingdom (Showtime) 2012 dramady written and directed by Wes
Anderson. The movie features an all star cast, including Anderson
regulars Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman. The movie takes place in a
summer camp in 1968. A young boy and girl (played by Kara Hayward who
looks like she could be Anna Kendrick's twin) run off together and have
quirky adventures while meeting quirky characters. The type of quirky
characters you'd expect to find in a movie written and directed by Wes
Anderson. I only saw this once before when it was first in the
theaters, and haven't really thought about it since. I guess it's OK.
I like this one. Note that the camera never dollies nor rotates
nor zooms, just moves left and right. Each scene is like it's framed
in a square, like a dollhouse room. It's, uh, art.
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-17 21:40:22 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Rushmore (Paramount+) 1998 dramedy written and directed by Wes Anderson.
I truly despise this movie.
Funny, I probably liked this one the most. It seemed to be the most
straight comedy of the three I watched.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
The Royal Tenenbaums (blu-ray) 2001 dramedy written and directed by Wes
Anderson.
I've never seen it. I suppose I really should.
You're not missing much. But if you like Wes Anderson movies it's worth
watching for completeness sake.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Moonrise Kingdom (Showtime) 2012 dramady written and directed by Wes
Anderson. The movie features an all star cast, including Anderson
regulars Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman. The movie takes place in a
summer camp in 1968. A young boy and girl (played by Kara Hayward who
looks like she could be Anna Kendrick's twin) run off together and have
quirky adventures while meeting quirky characters. The type of quirky
characters you'd expect to find in a movie written and directed by Wes
Anderson. I only saw this once before when it was first in the
theaters, and haven't really thought about it since. I guess it's OK.
I like this one. Note that the camera never dollies nor rotates
nor zooms, just moves left and right. Each scene is like it's framed
in a square, like a dollhouse room. It's, uh, art.
I hadn't noticed that. Yeah, I guess art.
Pete
2021-10-17 22:37:12 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!

I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.

-- Pete --
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 23:23:47 UTC
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Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.
-- Pete --
I’m not sure what the rules are on how far the ghosts can roam. At first it
looks like the cholera victims are stuck in the basement but later they
just come upstairs to vote so why do they hang out in the basement they
don’t seem to like?
And then later still they can apparently wander the grounds.
In the description for an episode of the British series they all camp
outside while the house is being tented for termites or something.




“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
suzeeq
2021-10-18 15:20:28 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did.  Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some
background.
    -- Pete --
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that!  :-/  OnDemand
Powers Active...
Yeah, that one seems to have snuck in under the radar for some of us.
Post by anim8rfsk
I’m not sure what the rules are on how far the ghosts can roam. At first it
looks like the cholera victims are stuck in the basement but later they
just come upstairs to vote so why do they hang out in the basement they
don’t seem to like?
And then later still they can apparently wander the grounds.
In the description for an episode of the British series they all camp
outside while the house is being tented for termites or something.
I guess it's best to get all the inconsistencies out of the way now so
by the time the show hits the second or third season you'll forget.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-18 18:07:05 UTC
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Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.



Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.
-- Pete --
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that! :-/ OnDemand
Powers Active...
Came as a surprise to me too.
Post by anim8rfsk
I’m not sure what the rules are on how far the ghosts can roam. At first it
looks like the cholera victims are stuck in the basement but later they
just come upstairs to vote so why do they hang out in the basement they
don’t seem to like?
And then later still they can apparently wander the grounds.
In the description for an episode of the British series they all camp
outside while the house is being tented for termites or something.
I guess it's best to get all the inconsistencies out of the way now so
by the time the show hits the second or third season you'll forget.
There are three seasons of the British show that they’re copying. You would
hope that they had worked out the bugs there!


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Pete
2021-10-19 01:24:45 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.
I’m not sure what the rules are on how far the ghosts can roam. At first it
looks like the cholera victims are stuck in the basement but later they
just come upstairs to vote so why do they hang out in the basement they
don’t seem to like?
And then later still they can apparently wander the grounds.
In the description for an episode of the British series they all camp
outside while the house is being tented for termites or something.
Frankly I don't that's something that's going to bother me much in this
series! As long as it's funny...! As Roger Rabbit once said: "not at
any time, only when it was funny". IOW, I'm not really a stickler for
consistency in a sitcom!

-- Pete --
Pete
2021-10-19 01:29:52 UTC
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Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
Thanks for that. I'll check them out...
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that! :-/ OnDemand
Powers Active...
Yeah -- it didn't exactly get much publicity1 (Though I don't watch
much CBS.)

-- Pete --
anim8rfsk
2021-10-19 03:55:19 UTC
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Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
Thanks for that. I'll check them out...
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some background.
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that! :-/ OnDemand
Powers Active...
Yeah -- it didn't exactly get much publicity1 (Though I don't watch
much CBS.)
-- Pete --
I only knew it existed at all because I reviewed the CBS Fall preview show.
I took CBS off my dial but I still watch Blue Bloods and two of the
dreadful NCIS shows and I’ve never seen an ad for Ghosts.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Pete
2021-10-19 04:14:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some
background.
Post by Pete
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that! :-/ OnDemand
Powers Active...
Yeah -- it didn't exactly get much publicity1 (Though I don't watch
much CBS.)
-- Pete --
I only knew it existed at all because I reviewed the CBS Fall preview show.
I took CBS off my dial but I still watch Blue Bloods and two of the
dreadful NCIS shows and I’ve never seen an ad for Ghosts.
I wish I unerstood how they decide how much to promote a show. I've just
been reading your other post on La Brea, and how much NBC have been promoting
that! I suppose it has something to do with up-front cost vs. risk.

-- Pete --
anim8rfsk
2021-10-19 04:53:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
I also -- as mentioned elsewhere -- caught up with the first eps of Ghosts,
and was glad I did. Found it pretty funny, and it filled in some
background.
Post by Pete
Ghosts is *already* airing?!?!? I *wanted* to see that! :-/ OnDemand
Powers Active...
Yeah -- it didn't exactly get much publicity1 (Though I don't watch
much CBS.)
-- Pete --
I only knew it existed at all because I reviewed the CBS Fall preview show.
I took CBS off my dial but I still watch Blue Bloods and two of the
dreadful NCIS shows and I’ve never seen an ad for Ghosts.
I wish I unerstood how they decide how much to promote a show. I've just
been reading your other post on La Brea, and how much NBC have been promoting
that! I suppose it has something to do with up-front cost vs. risk.
-- Pete --
Maybe they gave La Brea $1 million to spend on CGI creatures and they found
somebody in Canadia who did it for $1.57 American so they spent the rest on
advertising?
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Pete
2021-10-20 05:50:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
I managed to do what I promised (:-)) this afternoon, and watched them.
I actually thought they were rather good, and was glad I did!

What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?

-- Pete --
anim8rfsk
2021-10-20 06:52:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
I managed to do what I promised (:-)) this afternoon, and watched them.
I actually thought they were rather good, and was glad I did!
What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?
-- Pete --
They do a full tech rehearsal and I suppose if it runs long they would have
a Recorded sketch from that that they wouldn’t repeat when they do the live
version.. i’ve read that they’ve been known to swap out a better version
of a sketch from the tech rehearsal but I don’t know how they do that with
a live on the East Coast feed. Maybe they just fix it in reruns or possibly
for the later broadcast to the West Coast.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-20 21:35:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
I managed to do what I promised (:-)) this afternoon, and watched them.
I actually thought they were rather good, and was glad I did!
Yeah, often some of the cut sketches are better than what aired.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?
-- Pete --
They do a full tech rehearsal and I suppose if it runs long they would have
a Recorded sketch from that that they wouldn’t repeat when they do the live
version.. i’ve read that they’ve been known to swap out a better version
of a sketch from the tech rehearsal but I don’t know how they do that with
a live on the East Coast feed. Maybe they just fix it in reruns or possibly
for the later broadcast to the West Coast.

“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
They would swap the sketch for the West Coast feed before they went live
on both coasts. For years I'd hear about stuff that was live that we on
the West Coast never got to see. I'm really happy we get the east coast
live feed now. Plus I don't have to stay up until 1:00am just to watch SNL!
Pete
2021-10-21 06:00:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[Heh -- I started this reply hours ago, when the power went out! Just
before I was about to start dinner! Oh well...]
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
I managed to do what I promised (:-)) this afternoon, and watched them.
I actually thought they were rather good, and was glad I did!
Yeah, often some of the cut sketches are better than what aired.
Huh... Somebody's sense of humour must be somewhat off-base! (:-))
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?
They do a full tech rehearsal and I suppose if it runs long they would have
a Recorded sketch from that that they wouldn’t repeat when they do the live
version.. i’ve read that they’ve been known to swap out a better version
of a sketch from the tech rehearsal but I don’t know how they do that with
a live on the East Coast feed. Maybe they just fix it in reruns or possibly
for the later broadcast to the West Coast.
But is the rehearsal done before an audience? The cut-for-time skits
definitely seemed to have one. And there's no way they could swap a sketch
on the original feed, because it already would have gone out before they
could tell which was better!
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
—
They would swap the sketch for the West Coast feed before they went live
on both coasts. For years I'd hear about stuff that was live that we on
the West Coast never got to see. I'm really happy we get the east coast
live feed now. Plus I don't have to stay up until 1:00am just to watch SNL!
Don't think I was really aware of that. I'm mostly glad of the early
show, too, though this week Ghosts was a conflict, so I ended up watching
the late copy all the way through!

-- Pete --
Pete
2021-10-21 17:48:13 UTC
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Post by Pete
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Pete
What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?
They do a full tech rehearsal and I suppose if it runs long they
would have a Recorded sketch from that that they wouldn’Äôt repeat
when they do the live version.. i’Äôve read that they’Äôve been
known to swap out a better version of a sketch from the tech
rehearsal but I don’Äôt know how they do that with a live on the
East Coast feed. Maybe they just fix it in reruns or possibly for
the later broadcast to the West Coast.
But is the rehearsal done before an audience?
Yes, although it's a dress rehearsal and not merely a tech rehearsal.
Ahh, thanks. I guess all is explained, then...

-- Pete --
Ubiquitous
2021-10-21 12:04:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Pete
Post by Pete
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
SNL - Rami Malek hosts an OK episode.
I actually thought this was a rather good episode. I intended to
watch just the cold intro and weekend update as usual, but I surprisingly
found the sketches funny, and watched the whole thing. The choice was
easier after the surprise appearance of Daniel Craig, who had a major
role in a couple of sketches. And Malek himself made a very good host,
I thought. A couple of creative touches, too, like Pete Davidson playing
Malek and Malek playing Pete!
Yeah, that was probably the best skit. SNL puts their cut for time
skits on YouTube. This episode has three cut for time skits you'll want
to watch.
http://youtu.be/4-N6ldD0H2k
http://youtu.be/4UKX1PGvdqY
http://youtu.be/TOq0dzxouts
I managed to do what I promised (:-)) this afternoon, and watched them.
I actually thought they were rather good, and was glad I did!
What puzzles me though, is how skits can be "cut for time" from a show
broadcast live?! They didn't seem to be rehearsals, because there seemed
to be a full audience, so do they keep the audience there a while after
transmission, or what?
Yes, they perform (and record a dress rehersal) before a studio audience
before doing it for real (is it really performed "live" any more?). If it runs
long, they remove material and if something goes wrong, they'll run the taped
rehersal.

--
Let's go Brandon!
A Friend
2021-10-17 18:27:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article
Lost & Found Music Studios (Netflix) - Ep's #3-8.
Wow - it's amazing how many shows blow their pilot episode(s). (In
this case, the show actually blew its first two episodes!)
But about 3 and a half episodes in, the show suddenly gets
significantly more interesting when they start auditioning for new
admissions into the music program.
American idol was always best in it¹s audition phase.
So, what did you watch?
Hey, thanks for asking!
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
12 O¹Clock High is still running the
good ones before Paul Burke ruined it.
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a quarreling
couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James Mason is her
guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For me it continues to
have the problem that I just don¹t think Lucy is funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
Recording later today
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
Celebrities? Ha ha joke!
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM¹s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it¹s going to be gloriously terrible.
I looked it up. It's actually a 1979 film based on a novel by the
Strugatsky brothers, science fiction writers who were always getting
into trouble with Soviet authorities. (I see that "stalker" seems to
be the same word in Roman and Cyrillic. BTW the name of the novel,
Piknik na obochine, is Roadside Picnic.)
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 18:47:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
In article
Lost & Found Music Studios (Netflix) - Ep's #3-8.
Wow - it's amazing how many shows blow their pilot episode(s). (In
this case, the show actually blew its first two episodes!)
But about 3 and a half episodes in, the show suddenly gets
significantly more interesting when they start auditioning for new
admissions into the music program.
American idol was always best in it¹s audition phase.
So, what did you watch?
Hey, thanks for asking!
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.

Lost in space is the rare example where the second season is completely
unwatchable but the third season actually picked up some.

Leonard Nimoy recounts promising the press that Star Trek wasn’t going to
be a monster of the week show and then NBC decided to premiere with the man
trap which is as close to a monster of the week as Trek ever got.
Post by A Friend
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a quarreling
couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James Mason is her
guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For me it continues to
have the problem that I just don¹t think Lucy is funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
No. And in this, shot during a hiatus from I Love Lucy, they are pretty
much playing the same characters. Imagine an I love Lucy road trip with
just the two of them and no Fred or Ethel to play off of. The only reason
I’m still here at all is James Mason who’s having fun with it.
Post by A Friend
Recording later today
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
Celebrities? Ha ha joke!
Exactly! But last weeks was actually pretty good as the wacky “celebrities”
took control away from Sajak. And I worked with Chabert if only by remote
control on Thornberries..
Post by A Friend
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM¹s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it¹s going to be gloriously terrible.
I looked it up. It's actually a 1979 film based on a novel by the
Strugatsky brothers, science fiction writers who were always getting
into trouble with Soviet authorities. (I see that "stalker" seems to
be the same word in Roman and Cyrillic. BTW the name of the novel,
Piknik na obochine, is Roadside Picnic.)
LOL!
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 20:58:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn’t every outer limits episode have some sort of monster? I
thought it was a rule.
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-17 21:37:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn’t every outer limits episode have some sort of monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 23:21:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn’t every outer limits episode have some sort of monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
I was counting aliens as monsters. And the terminator soldier from the
future. In the time travel episode with Martin Landau he’s a monster. I
can’t think of any other time travel episodes.
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-19 18:53:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn’t every outer limits episode have some sort of monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
I was counting aliens as monsters. And the terminator soldier from the
future.
You can *not* count a human time traveler as a monster!

In the time travel episode with Martin Landau he’s a monster. I
Post by anim8rfsk
can’t think of any other time travel episodes.
I took a look at a list of episodes. Just scrolling through the first
season I saw several episodes with no monsters or aliens. They all have
sci-fi themes, but sometimes only with humans.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-19 23:54:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don¹t see that on the Broadway stage very often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it¹s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It’s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn’t every outer limits episode have some sort of monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
I was counting aliens as monsters. And the terminator soldier from the
future.
You can *not* count a human time traveler as a monster!
In the time travel episode with Martin Landau he’s a monster. I
Post by anim8rfsk
can’t think of any other time travel episodes.
I took a look at a list of episodes. Just scrolling through the first
season I saw several episodes with no monsters or aliens. They all have
sci-fi themes, but sometimes only with humans.
In his rather sloppy Wikipedia article, Ian says:

“Each show in Season 1 was to have a monster or creature as a critical part
of the story line. Season 1 writer and producer Joseph Stefano believed
this element was necessary to provide fear, suspense, or at least a center
for plot development. This kind of story element became known as "the
bear".”

Ian then goes on to list exceptions to the rule which I don’t necessarily
agree with. For instance, I would consider Barry Morse, a Martian disguised
as a human, as a bear.

Ian counts “the form of things unknown” that weird episode that nobody
understands with David “ducky” McCallum as a time traveler that really
isn’t an outer limits episode anyway as not having a bear. I suppose I have
to give him that.

“The borderland” has a guy who sort of turns himself inside out and almost
makes it to another dimension which is no doubt chock-full of bears but
comes back at the last minute without much happening. They’re also trying
to bring back a dead guy which I would count as a bear but they never
succeed in that either. No bears, but not for lack of trying.

Finally “the hundred days of the dragon“ has the Chinese trying to take
over the country by replacing people in the White House. Things haven’t
changed much since the 1960s have they? I guess it would really be
stretching it to consider doppelgängers to be bears.

So three bearless episodes in season one.



“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
A Friend
2021-10-20 02:48:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production
values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black
prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don1t see that on the Broadway stage very
often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it1s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It¹s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn¹t every outer limits episode have some sort of
monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
I was counting aliens as monsters. And the terminator soldier from the
future.
You can *not* count a human time traveler as a monster!
In the time travel episode with Martin Landau he¹s a monster. I
Post by anim8rfsk
can¹t think of any other time travel episodes.
I took a look at a list of episodes. Just scrolling through the first
season I saw several episodes with no monsters or aliens. They all have
sci-fi themes, but sometimes only with humans.
³Each show in Season 1 was to have a monster or creature as a critical part
of the story line. Season 1 writer and producer Joseph Stefano believed
this element was necessary to provide fear, suspense, or at least a center
for plot development. This kind of story element became known as "the
bear".²
Ian then goes on to list exceptions to the rule which I don¹t necessarily
agree with. For instance, I would consider Barry Morse, a Martian disguised
as a human, as a bear.
Ian counts ³the form of things unknown² that weird episode that nobody
understands with David ³ducky² McCallum as a time traveler that really
isn¹t an outer limits episode anyway as not having a bear. I suppose I have
to give him that.
³The borderland² has a guy who sort of turns himself inside out and almost
makes it to another dimension which is no doubt chock-full of bears but
comes back at the last minute without much happening. They¹re also trying
to bring back a dead guy which I would count as a bear but they never
succeed in that either. No bears, but not for lack of trying.
Finally ³the hundred days of the dragon³ has the Chinese trying to take
over the country by replacing people in the White House. Things haven¹t
changed much since the 1960s have they? I guess it would really be
stretching it to consider doppelgängers to be bears.
So three bearless episodes in season one.
The Outer Limits was supposed to be based in science fiction generally.
ABC, in the person of a network executive named Dorothy Brown, said
science fiction meant monsters, so the shows had to be about monsters
and not "monsters of the imagination" or whatever. Dorothy wanted
creatures and big bugs and so on every week. Thereupon, ABC took the
show away from Leslie Stevens and Dick Stefano after s1 and gave it to
Ben Brady, who'd done The Three Stooges.

I worked at ABC in Dorothy's department about ten years after all this,
and all the major players were still there.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-20 03:16:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
In article
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
David Hasselhoff *is* Jekyll and Hyde the musical (YouTube)
This is surprisingly good. A decent score and good production
values. And a
somewhat surprising storyline. The Hoff as the Hyde originally starts out
doing in people that have it coming. The end of the first act has him
beating senseless a rich pervert who is abusing underage black
prostitutes
and sets him on fire! You don1t see that on the Broadway stage very
often.
Not since The Sound of Music, anyway.
Seriously? They immolate people on stage?
Snarf. I'd have loved if someone sent that note to Rogers and Hammerstein.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by A Friend
The usual suspect reruns in the middle of the night. Voyage to the bottom
of the sea begins it1s final season.
These are just awful. ABC was insisting that science fiction meant
monsters, which is why Voyage and The Time Tunnel (and The Outer Limits
before them) were turned into alien-of-the-week shows.
Yeah, voyage just makes a continuous linear decline from the first episode
to the last episode. It¹s sort of sad.
I like some of the Outer Limits monster episodes, though.
Absolutely. Doesn¹t every outer limits episode have some sort of
monster? I
thought it was a rule.
I had to think about it for a second, but definitely not. Even if you
count the "aliens" as monsters, they still had time travel episodes
which only featured humans. And I'm sure there were other episodes I'm
blanking on that were humans only.
I was counting aliens as monsters. And the terminator soldier from the
future.
You can *not* count a human time traveler as a monster!
In the time travel episode with Martin Landau he¹s a monster. I
Post by anim8rfsk
can¹t think of any other time travel episodes.
I took a look at a list of episodes. Just scrolling through the first
season I saw several episodes with no monsters or aliens. They all have
sci-fi themes, but sometimes only with humans.
³Each show in Season 1 was to have a monster or creature as a critical part
of the story line. Season 1 writer and producer Joseph Stefano believed
this element was necessary to provide fear, suspense, or at least a center
for plot development. This kind of story element became known as "the
bear".²
Ian then goes on to list exceptions to the rule which I don¹t necessarily
agree with. For instance, I would consider Barry Morse, a Martian disguised
as a human, as a bear.
Ian counts ³the form of things unknown² that weird episode that nobody
understands with David ³ducky² McCallum as a time traveler that really
isn¹t an outer limits episode anyway as not having a bear. I suppose I have
to give him that.
³The borderland² has a guy who sort of turns himself inside out and almost
makes it to another dimension which is no doubt chock-full of bears but
comes back at the last minute without much happening. They¹re also trying
to bring back a dead guy which I would count as a bear but they never
succeed in that either. No bears, but not for lack of trying.
Finally ³the hundred days of the dragon³ has the Chinese trying to take
over the country by replacing people in the White House. Things haven¹t
changed much since the 1960s have they? I guess it would really be
stretching it to consider doppelgängers to be bears.
So three bearless episodes in season one.
The Outer Limits was supposed to be based in science fiction generally.
ABC, in the person of a network executive named Dorothy Brown, said
science fiction meant monsters, so the shows had to be about monsters
and not "monsters of the imagination" or whatever. Dorothy wanted
creatures and big bugs and so on every week. Thereupon, ABC took the
show away from Leslie Stevens and Dick Stefano after s1 and gave it to
Ben Brady, who'd done The Three Stooges.
I worked at ABC in Dorothy's department about ten years after all this,
and all the major players were still there.
Cool, thanks!
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Micky DuPree
2021-10-31 05:46:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
In article
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James
Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For
me it continues to have the problem that I just don't think Lucy is
funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_ fit
well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had come
home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up their
factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere. Lucy
Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always put
back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of people
are comfortable with that.

I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in the
'70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time ago,
so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of, "Oh my
god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the fan, saying,
"You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she appreciated the
difference.

A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.

-Micky
A Friend
2021-10-31 11:55:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by A Friend
In article
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James
Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For
me it continues to have the problem that I just don't think Lucy is
funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_ fit
well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had come
home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up their
factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere. Lucy
Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always put
back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of people
are comfortable with that.
I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in the
'70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time ago,
so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of, "Oh my
god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the fan, saying,
"You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she appreciated the
difference.
A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.
-Micky
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star of
the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried. Jerry
Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.

Richard Crenna turned to drama, and I remember how controversial his
casting in The Sand Pebbles was. Clint Eastwood also made the
transition.

I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-31 16:14:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by A Friend
In article
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James
Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For
me it continues to have the problem that I just don't think Lucy is
funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_ fit
well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had come
home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up their
factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere. Lucy
Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always put
back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of people
are comfortable with that.
I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in the
'70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time ago,
so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of, "Oh my
god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the fan, saying,
"You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she appreciated the
difference.
A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.
-Micky
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star of
the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried. Jerry
Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched all
of his movies on TV.
Post by A Friend
Richard Crenna turned to drama, and I remember how controversial his
casting in The Sand Pebbles was. Clint Eastwood also made the
transition.
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
I grew up in the 80s/90s watching reruns of TV shows from the 60s and
70s. When I was a kid, if the show was in color, a lot of the time it
didn't even occur to me I was watching a rerun of a long canceled show.
To a certain degree even if it was Black and White show, I didn't
really have a concept of reruns or cancellation when I was really young.
It was all just stuff on TV. But with some shows like Andy Griffith,
where the actors were still around making new stuff, I could tell it was
just obviously old reruns.

That's how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying tons
of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never have
that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will have never
watched the original from the 60s, but they will also never have watched
the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.

When there are only a handful of channels it's easy to randomly stumble
upon some old show and become a fan. But that's not the world we live
in anymore. Some truly wonderful shows that would more than hold up
today (or at least still be entertaining) will simply be forever lost to
future generations. Same thing goes for movies.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-31 16:51:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by A Friend
In article
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James
Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For
me it continues to have the problem that I just don't think Lucy is
funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_ fit
well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had come
home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up their
factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere. Lucy
Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always put
back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of people
are comfortable with that.
I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in the
'70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time ago,
so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of, "Oh my
god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the fan, saying,
"You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she appreciated the
difference.
A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.
-Micky
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star of
the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried. Jerry
Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched all
of his movies on TV.
Post by A Friend
Richard Crenna turned to drama, and I remember how controversial his
casting in The Sand Pebbles was. Clint Eastwood also made the
transition.
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
I grew up in the 80s/90s watching reruns of TV shows from the 60s and
70s. When I was a kid, if the show was in color, a lot of the time it
didn't even occur to me I was watching a rerun of a long canceled show.
To a certain degree even if it was Black and White show, I didn't
really have a concept of reruns or cancellation when I was really young.
It was all just stuff on TV. But with some shows like Andy Griffith,
where the actors were still around making new stuff, I could tell it was
just obviously old reruns.
Andy Griffith got me all confused because there was the real show and there
were the reruns and there was black and white and there was color and there
was the funny stuff with Don Knotts and there was the lousy stuff without
Don Knotts and there was the version called the Andy Griffith show and the
version called Andy of Mayberry.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
That’s how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying tons
of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never have
that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will have never
watched the original from the 60s, but they will also never have watched
the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.
Which is why they don’t realize how truly dreadful the new stuff is.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
When there are only a handful of channels it’s easy to randomly stumble
upon some old show and become a fan. But that's not the world we live
in anymore. Some truly wonderful shows that would more than hold up
today (or at least still be entertaining) will simply be forever lost to
future generations. Same thing goes for movies.
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Micky DuPree
2021-11-12 21:36:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried.
Jerry Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its real
name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would have been
hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s even in reruns,
unless you count his telethons for muscular dystrophy.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
I grew up in the 80s/90s watching reruns of TV shows from the 60s and
70s. When I was a kid, if the show was in color, a lot of the time it
didn't even occur to me I was watching a rerun of a long canceled show.
To a certain degree even if it was Black and White show, I didn't
really have a concept of reruns or cancellation when I was really young.
It was all just stuff on TV. But with some shows like Andy
Griffith, where the actors were still around making new stuff, I could
tell it was just obviously old reruns.
I think you're one of the last people to experience TV this way as a kid
(which is really boomer-style TV watching, though you seem to be one of
the younger members of Generation X). Out of curiosity, may I ask when
your household first got cable?
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
That's how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying tons
of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never have
that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will have
never watched the original from the 60s, but they will also never have
watched the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.
Some people who are dedicated SF junkies will watch old SF stuff just
because it's SF, but you're completely right that for most younger
viewers, there's a disconnect with past material. This is especially
true for TV and movies in black & white. I agree, it's sad. Not
everything from the old days is solid gold, of course, but there is a
lot that's worth a look, even if only for cultural literacy reasons,
that's going to get lost to disinterest in the next couple of decades.

There's also a cognitive divide that I ascribe to MTV. The editing on
music videos grew to be much faster than traditional A/V material, and
TV and movies came to copy that pace. People who grew up on that tend
to reject older material as "too slow."

I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on TV,
but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for them
anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing as a
kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and an
occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
When there are only a handful of channels it's easy to randomly
stumble upon some old show and become a fan. But that's not the world
we live in anymore. Some truly wonderful shows that would more than
hold up today (or at least still be entertaining) will simply be
forever lost to future generations. Same thing goes for movies.
My suspicion for a couple of decades now has been that cable programming
is at the heart of it. As you say, when there's only a handful of
channels, you sample more of what they have to offer. Once there were
scores of channels to choose from -- some targeted directly at younger
age brackets while others might be dismissed as old people's channels --
young people steered outside their usual "lanes" less often because there
were only so many hours in the day to watch TV. By the '90s, most
American kids could come home from school and find contemporary
kid-targeted programming that lasted until 8 PM. They weren't going to
watch _I Love Lucy_ (nor even the marathon of the much better _The
Fugitive_ that TV Land ran once).

-Micky
A Friend
2021-11-12 22:20:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Micky DuPree
I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on TV,
but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for them
anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing as a
kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and an
occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
Channel 7 in NYC ran half an hour of silent Terrytoons on weekday
mornings up to about 1962. They starred a critter who looked like
Felix the Cat that chased mice, and the mice always won.
Micky DuPree
2021-11-27 05:08:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on
TV, but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for
them anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing
as a kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and
an occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
Channel 7 in NYC ran half an hour of silent Terrytoons on weekday
mornings up to about 1962. They starred a critter who looked like
Felix the Cat that chased mice, and the mice always won.
Yeah, but I had to go to college to see any feature films from that era,
put on as annual special events with the legendary John Kiley, the
organist at Boston's Fenway Park, accompanying the films live on MIT's
Kresge Auditorium pipe organ. While I expect there may have been art
houses in major metropolitan areas staging events like that here and
there, the mass audience -- even the people who grew up on silent films
-- wasn't interested in revisiting the medium. In the '60s and early
'70s, I could see English-language talkies in local syndication going
all the way back to their beginning, but not movies from one year before
that (except for, as you point out, some short material packaged for
kids).

A lot of the better received silent movies were remade as talkies, mined
for material. I've seen a survey of silent features and shorts (in
preparation for being a TA in a film survey course), and I have to admit
that it's an odd medium. I've heard the claim that a really good
director can tell a story without dialogue, but even the silents weren't
necessarily without dialogue (they just printed it on title cards), and
they were almost never silent (being accompanied by music). Like a lot
of art forms that people no longer grow up with, you kind of have to put
yourself in the appropriate frame of mind to make the right allowances
for the different conventions. About the only silent feature I've seen
that I think holds up without having to make a lot of mental adjustments
for today is Keaton's _The General_. Maybe Turner Classics runs the
occasional silent? I dunno. I haven't gotten that channel in bleeping
decades. It's always in some package that I don't want anything else
from.

-Micky
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-11-13 00:03:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried.
Jerry Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its real
name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would have been
hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s even in reruns,
unless you count his telethons for muscular dystrophy.
Off the top of my head, The Nutty Professor and Visit to a Small Planet.
I know I watched one or two Marin and Lewis movies, but I couldn't
tell you which ones. I also Know I saw the Lewis movie where he formed
his own private army during WWII. And I think one where he was a clown.
I'm sure there are others that I'm blanking on. There were also the
telethons, but from my perspective he was a at least former, movie star.
I doubt I had much awareness of a TV show. I certainly never saw it.
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
I grew up in the 80s/90s watching reruns of TV shows from the 60s and
70s. When I was a kid, if the show was in color, a lot of the time it
didn't even occur to me I was watching a rerun of a long canceled show.
To a certain degree even if it was Black and White show, I didn't
really have a concept of reruns or cancellation when I was really young.
It was all just stuff on TV. But with some shows like Andy
Griffith, where the actors were still around making new stuff, I could
tell it was just obviously old reruns.
I think you're one of the last people to experience TV this way as a kid
(which is really boomer-style TV watching, though you seem to be one of
the younger members of Generation X). Out of curiosity, may I ask when
your household first got cable?
It's complicated. Cable came and went over the years. And you have to
differentiate between household and my personal TV. But in simplest
terms, household as long as I can remember. My personal TV, when I was
around 14. For those of you who grew up without cable you're probably
thinking I was young. But now that I think about how old I was, I'm
thinking wow I was *old.* LOL.
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
That's how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying tons
of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never have
that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will have
never watched the original from the 60s, but they will also never have
watched the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.
Some people who are dedicated SF junkies will watch old SF stuff just
because it's SF, but you're completely right that for most younger
viewers, there's a disconnect with past material. This is especially
true for TV and movies in black & white. I agree, it's sad. Not
everything from the old days is solid gold, of course, but there is a
lot that's worth a look, even if only for cultural literacy reasons,
that's going to get lost to disinterest in the next couple of decades.
There's also a cognitive divide that I ascribe to MTV. The editing on
music videos grew to be much faster than traditional A/V material, and
TV and movies came to copy that pace. People who grew up on that tend
to reject older material as "too slow."
I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on TV,
but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for them
anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing as a
kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and an
occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
I've only seen a handful of silent movies, but I liked them.
Coincidentally, I actually have "Metropolis" sitting on my DVR right
now. I know I saw it once before about 20+ years ago on laser disc. I
think I liked it. I can't promise I'll finish it, but once I get my new
theater up and running I want to give it a shot on the "big screen" and
see how it looks. Maybe I'll watch all of it, maybe not.
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
When there are only a handful of channels it's easy to randomly
stumble upon some old show and become a fan. But that's not the world
we live in anymore. Some truly wonderful shows that would more than
hold up today (or at least still be entertaining) will simply be
forever lost to future generations. Same thing goes for movies.
My suspicion for a couple of decades now has been that cable programming
is at the heart of it. As you say, when there's only a handful of
channels, you sample more of what they have to offer. Once there were
scores of channels to choose from -- some targeted directly at younger
age brackets while others might be dismissed as old people's channels --
young people steered outside their usual "lanes" less often because there
were only so many hours in the day to watch TV. By the '90s, most
American kids could come home from school and find contemporary
kid-targeted programming that lasted until 8 PM. They weren't going to
watch _I Love Lucy_ (nor even the marathon of the much better _The
Fugitive_ that TV Land ran once).
-Micky
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
anim8rfsk
2021-11-13 00:51:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
A Friend
2021-11-13 03:48:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article
Post by anim8rfsk
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop¹s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say ³hey, that¹s one of the champions!² And it led off their
obituaries as well.
William Gaunt is still alive at 84. Your post is, I think, the first
I'd heard that Alexandra Bastedo was dead.
anim8rfsk
2021-11-13 04:23:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
In article
Post by anim8rfsk
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop¹s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say ³hey, that¹s one of the champions!² And it led off their
obituaries as well.
William Gaunt is still alive at 84. Your post is, I think, the first
I'd heard that Alexandra Bastedo was dead.
Stuff like that gets mentioned on the Facebook groups I haunt.

She had been approached to make a come back and in interviews was
pleasantly surprised anybody remembered her. But it never happened.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
shawn
2021-11-13 04:13:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.
I didn't see the show but I will agree that she was quite the lovely
woman. There's a great degree of strength in her face that really
enhances her looks.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3308786/Eastenders-actress-leaves-900-000-animal-sanctuary-founded.html

https://iconicimages.net/photo/jb120-alexandra-bastedo/
anim8rfsk
2021-11-13 04:34:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.
I didn't see the show but I will agree that she was quite the lovely
woman. There's a great degree of strength in her face that really
enhances her looks.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3308786/Eastenders-actress-leaves-900-000-animal-sanctuary-founded.html
https://iconicimages.net/photo/jb120-alexandra-bastedo/
Thanks! I had forgotten she was in CASINO ROYALE.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
shawn
2021-11-13 06:59:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.
I haven't had a chance to check any of the episodes out but I was
pleasantly surprised to see the entire series of THE CHAMPIONS is
available on Usenet.
shawn
2021-11-13 07:05:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 13 Nov 2021 01:59:41 -0500, shawn
Post by shawn
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.
I haven't had a chance to check any of the episodes out but I was
pleasantly surprised to see the entire series of THE CHAMPIONS is
available on Usenet.
And on Youtube as well:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLw6gg897HVfu237LwSzqBcWYWqOFRor9c
Ubiquitous
2021-11-15 14:54:19 UTC
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Post by shawn
Post by shawn
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Alexandra Bastedo was hot. Hot, hot, hot, hotter than all of the slim girls
Ian likes rolled into one huge multi legged creature crawling on a
depression era cop’s shoulder.. Hot and cool in the same breath the way
only English women can be. Even though it only ran for the one season and
was very seldom shown again it became the key project for the three stars.
Whenever they tried to do anything else people of my generation would point
and say “hey, that’s one of the champions!” And it led off their
obituaries as well.
I haven't had a chance to check any of the episodes out but I was
pleasantly surprised to see the entire series of THE CHAMPIONS is
available on Usenet.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLw6gg897HVfu237LwSzqBcWYWqOFRor9c
I think Shout Factory TV was playing them at some point.

--
Let's go Brandon!
A Friend
2021-11-13 03:45:50 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried.
Jerry Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its real
name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would have been
hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s even in reruns,
unless you count his telethons for muscular dystrophy.
Off the top of my head, The Nutty Professor and Visit to a Small Planet.
I know I watched one or two Marin and Lewis movies, but I couldn't
tell you which ones. I also Know I saw the Lewis movie where he formed
his own private army during WWII. And I think one where he was a clown.
I'm sure there are others that I'm blanking on. There were also the
telethons, but from my perspective he was a at least former, movie star.
I doubt I had much awareness of a TV show. I certainly never saw it.
Jerry Lewis tried a TV series twice. Both were variety shows. The
first one was IIRC on ABC, was live, two or three hours long, and was
very Vegas-y. The second, a much more traditional variety show, was on
NBC, was an hour long, and was pre-recorded. The best thing on it was
a continuing sketch about a villain named Ralph Rotten, played by
Jerry. Unfortunately, the show was tanking. They tried to change
things up by doing it live on tape (a la Carol Burnett) in front of a
live audience. This meant they couldn't do Ralph Rotten anymore
because, for one thing, the sketches required a lot of cutting and, for
another, Ralph's makeup took forever.

I think the mistake everybody made was trying to make Jerry Lewis be
Dean Martin. I think Jerry might have done very well in a dramedy in
which he wasn't playing himself.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
The Champions was a Brit series that ran as a summer replacement on NBC
in 1968. (I think they reran the first season the following year.) I
don't recall that it made any impression at all -- unlike, say, The
Prisoner, which the U.S. first saw as a summer replacement for Jackie
Gleason's variety hour. BTW one of the lead actors on The Champions,
Stuart Damon, hit it big on the American soap opera General Hospital,
on which he played a doctor for 30 years. Damon died last June.

I see why they're trying to make a Champions movie, though, as the
agents have super-powers. BTW if they ever rerun the original series,
look for Dave Prowse in ep 2 as a weightlifter who is completely
outdone by the puny-looking Champions guys. (Prowse is also in ep 25
as a big, evil Arab.) I should add in here somewhere that I thought
the series was awful, with not nearly enough super-stuff.
anim8rfsk
2021-11-13 04:19:24 UTC
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!
Post by A Friend
The Champions was a Brit series that ran as a summer replacement on NBC
in 1968. (I think they reran the first season the following year.) I
don't recall that it made any impression at all -- unlike, say, The
Prisoner, which the U.S. first saw as a summer replacement for Jackie
Gleason's variety hour. BTW one of the lead actors on The Champions,
Stuart Damon, hit it big on the American soap opera General Hospital,
on which he played a doctor for 30 years. Damon died last June.
I see why they're trying to make a Champions movie, though, as the
agents have super-powers. BTW if they ever rerun the original series,
look for Dave Prowse in ep 2 as a weightlifter who is completely
outdone by the puny-looking Champions guys. (Prowse is also in ep 25
as a big, evil Arab.) I should add in here somewhere that I thought
the series was awful, with not nearly enough super-stuff.
That’s the main problem I recall with it is that they weren’t very super.
No doubt the movie will change that dramatically.
The original series is available to stream on BritBox.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Ubiquitous
2021-11-15 09:50:57 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried.
Jerry Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its real
name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would have been
hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s even in reruns,
unless you count his telethons for muscular dystrophy.
Off the top of my head, The Nutty Professor and Visit to a Small Planet.
I know I watched one or two Marin and Lewis movies, but I couldn't
tell you which ones. I also Know I saw the Lewis movie where he formed
his own private army during WWII. And I think one where he was a clown.
I'm sure there are others that I'm blanking on. There were also the
telethons, but from my perspective he was a at least former, movie star.
I doubt I had much awareness of a TV show. I certainly never saw it.
I, too, remember watching Jerry lewis movies on TV as a child on Sunday
mornings. I don't remember any of them, save for one in which he worked
at NASA (or something like it) and everyone called him "dead head". Of
course, as required by any movie that takes place there, he somehow
accidentally launched himself into space.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by A Friend
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966. Nowadays the show runs only here and
there, sometimes only overnight, as if they're still programming it
because they think they have to. The modern audience really doesn't
care about I Love Lucy at all.
That's how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying tons
of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never have
that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will have
never watched the original from the 60s, but they will also never have
watched the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.
Some people who are dedicated SF junkies will watch old SF stuff just
because it's SF, but you're completely right that for most younger
viewers, there's a disconnect with past material. This is especially
true for TV and movies in black & white. I agree, it's sad. Not
everything from the old days is solid gold, of course, but there is a
lot that's worth a look, even if only for cultural literacy reasons,
that's going to get lost to disinterest in the next couple of decades.
There's also a cognitive divide that I ascribe to MTV. The editing on
music videos grew to be much faster than traditional A/V material, and
TV and movies came to copy that pace. People who grew up on that tend
to reject older material as "too slow."
I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on TV,
but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for them
anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing as a
kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and an
occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
I've only seen a handful of silent movies, but I liked them.
Coincidentally, I actually have "Metropolis" sitting on my DVR right
now. I know I saw it once before about 20+ years ago on laser disc. I
think I liked it. I can't promise I'll finish it, but once I get my new
theater up and running I want to give it a shot on the "big screen" and
see how it looks. Maybe I'll watch all of it, maybe not.
There was a show on PBS abouit silent movies that played on Sundays.
I think it was called something like "Masters of the Silver Screen"?
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
When there are only a handful of channels it's easy to randomly
stumble upon some old show and become a fan. But that's not the world
we live in anymore. Some truly wonderful shows that would more than
hold up today (or at least still be entertaining) will simply be
forever lost to future generations. Same thing goes for movies.
My suspicion for a couple of decades now has been that cable programming
is at the heart of it. As you say, when there's only a handful of
channels, you sample more of what they have to offer. Once there were
scores of channels to choose from -- some targeted directly at younger
age brackets while others might be dismissed as old people's channels --
young people steered outside their usual "lanes" less often because there
were only so many hours in the day to watch TV. By the '90s, most
American kids could come home from school and find contemporary
kid-targeted programming that lasted until 8 PM. They weren't going to
watch _I Love Lucy_ (nor even the marathon of the much better _The
Fugitive_ that TV Land ran once).
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old 60s
sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show until
today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a kid.
But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
Are you talking about the show about a trio who were rescued by Shangri-La
in Tibet and got powers from their experience?

--
Let's go Brandon!
Micky DuPree
2021-11-27 10:25:04 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried.
Jerry Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its real
name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would have
been hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s even in
reruns, unless you count his telethons for muscular dystrophy.
Off the top of my head, The Nutty Professor and Visit to a Small
Planet. I know I watched one or two Marin and Lewis movies, but I
couldn't tell you which ones. I also Know I saw the Lewis movie where
he formed his own private army during WWII. And I think one where he
was a clown. I'm sure there are others that I'm blanking on. There
were also the telethons, but from my perspective he was a at least
former, movie star.
I looked it up to make sure I wasn't spacing. The trajectory of the
Martin & Lewis team was nightclub act in mid-40s to radio show in late
'40s to TV show in 1950. From there they got a film deal, which was
commercially successful, though the films weren't standouts.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I doubt I had much awareness of a TV show. I certainly never saw it.
What survives of the show is on kinescope, and as I said, I've never
seen it in syndication. I can't even remember seeing it show up in the
listings for one of the retro channels. Here's a decent copy if you
want to see what it looked like:



It was before my time. I just got an oral history of Martin & Lewis
from my mom when I was growing up because there was the huuuuge mystery
surrounding their breakup. (I figure it was either money or a woman,
but last I heard, they both took the secret to their graves.)
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I grew up in the 80s/90s watching reruns of TV shows from the 60s
and 70s. When I was a kid, if the show was in color, a lot of the
time it didn't even occur to me I was watching a rerun of a long
canceled show. To a certain degree even if it was Black and White
show, I didn't really have a concept of reruns or cancellation when
I was really young. It was all just stuff on TV. But with some shows
like Andy Griffith, where the actors were still around making new
stuff, I could tell it was just obviously old reruns.
I think you're one of the last people to experience TV this way as a
kid (which is really boomer-style TV watching, though you seem to be
one of the younger members of Generation X). Out of curiosity, may I
ask when your household first got cable?
It's complicated. Cable came and went over the years. And you have to
differentiate between household and my personal TV. But in simplest
terms, household as long as I can remember. My personal TV, when I was
around 14. For those of you who grew up without cable you're probably
thinking I was young. But now that I think about how old I was, I'm
thinking wow I was *old.* LOL.
So you had a foot in both worlds. You saw some cable shows, but a lot
of the time you were watching broadcast shows in your room up until 14.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
That's how I was able to grow up in the 80s watching and enjoying
tons of shows from the 60s and 70s. But modern audiences will never
have that experience. So a young Star Trek fan for example, will
have never watched the original from the 60s, but they will also
never have watched the shows from the 80s, 90s, or 00s either.
Some people who are dedicated SF junkies will watch old SF stuff just
because it's SF, but you're completely right that for most younger
viewers, there's a disconnect with past material. This is especially
true for TV and movies in black & white. I agree, it's sad. Not
everything from the old days is solid gold, of course, but there is a
lot that's worth a look, even if only for cultural literacy reasons,
that's going to get lost to disinterest in the next couple of
decades.
There's also a cognitive divide that I ascribe to MTV. The editing on
music videos grew to be much faster than traditional A/V material,
and TV and movies came to copy that pace. People who grew up on that
tend to reject older material as "too slow."
I think the last disconnect that sharp was the almost complete
abandonment of silent movies after the talkies showed up. When I was
growing up in the '60s, all manner of old movies were syndicated on
TV, but the line was drawn at silents. People wouldn't sit still for
them anymore, not even the people who had grown up with them like my
grandparents. The only silent movie material I can remember seeing as
a kid was Keystone Kops shorts run early on Saturday mornings and an
occasional Charlie Chaplin bit.
I've only seen a handful of silent movies, but I liked them.
Coincidentally, I actually have "Metropolis" sitting on my DVR right
now. I know I saw it once before about 20+ years ago on laser disc. I
think I liked it. I can't promise I'll finish it, but once I get my
new theater up and running I want to give it a shot on the "big
screen" and see how it looks. Maybe I'll watch all of it, maybe not.
It made me chuckle, because I have a suspicion that if a dedicated SF
fan has seen only one silent movie, it's probably _Metropolis_. (Yes, I
see you said you've seen others, but I'm not so sure it's a huge
coincidence that the one you mentioned is _Metropolis_.)
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old
60s sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show
until today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a
kid. But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
It was a great show to stumble across if you were a 10-year-old in 1968
who liked superheroes (which I was). I've seen a few eps. since then,
and while it's very nostalgic for me, it's like coming across a specimen
trapped in amber. You couldn't interest kids today in the original
series, and as far as adults are concerned, I'd only recommend it for
ITC history buffs. In fact, apart from _The Prisoner_, just about the
only ITC import from that era that I've seen and that I think can hold
an adult's interest today is _Man in a Suitcase_, which isn't that well
known. There are still some ITC dramas that I'd like to sample, but
even with YouTube, there's always the problem of finding the time.

-Micky
A Friend
2021-11-27 12:05:19 UTC
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Post by Micky DuPree
It was before my time. I just got an oral history of Martin & Lewis
from my mom when I was growing up because there was the huuuuge mystery
surrounding their breakup. (I figure it was either money or a woman,
but last I heard, they both took the secret to their graves.)
The story that's gotten around is that Dino got drunk one night and
made a pass at Jerry, which was it for Jerry.
anim8rfsk
2021-11-27 15:18:34 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
It was before my time. I just got an oral history of Martin & Lewis
from my mom when I was growing up because there was the huuuuge mystery
surrounding their breakup. (I figure it was either money or a woman,
but last I heard, they both took the secret to their graves.)
The story that's gotten around is that Dino got drunk one night and
made a pass at Jerry, which was it for Jerry.
Don’t you think that Jerry Lewis would’ve been pretty easy to get sick of?
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
A Friend
2021-11-27 17:53:51 UTC
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In article
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
It was before my time. I just got an oral history of Martin & Lewis
from my mom when I was growing up because there was the huuuuge mystery
surrounding their breakup. (I figure it was either money or a woman,
but last I heard, they both took the secret to their graves.)
The story that's gotten around is that Dino got drunk one night and
made a pass at Jerry, which was it for Jerry.
Don¹t you think that Jerry Lewis would¹ve been pretty easy to get sick of?
Oh, sweet Jeebus, yes. More than once, though, Martin told Jerry that
he was nothing more than a meal ticket to him. I think Jerry was
always looking for approval and emotional support, but he never got it
from Dino. Note that Jerry never even looked for another partner after
Dino -- not that he needed one.
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-11-27 19:29:57 UTC
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I was sampling bits and pieces of the show and a commercial caught my
attention. The commercial was for a contest and the announcer told the
home audience to send in a product wrapper or a "facsimile" of the
wrapper. How would someone at home in 1954 send in a facsimile? I know
they don't mean a fax, but copy machines hadn't been invented yet (I
think) at least not ones the general public would have had easy access
to, so how would they do it?
First, they had to allow facsimiles because it was illegal in many
jurisdictions to require that something had to be purchased in order to
enter a contest or drawing. It was too much like gambling.
A facsimile could be as simple as you drawing a sketch of the wrapper
yourself. More often you'd just clip a picture of the product from a
newspaper or magazine.
There were copy machines in 1954, but they were alcohol-based. An
image would be created by heating the paper and burning an alcohol
wash. The phrase "burn this" was still being used in newsrooms to mean
"copy this" even well beyond the introduction of Xerox machines in the
'60s.
Thanks! I had no idea of any of this.
I know about life in the 50s from the handful of movies I watched either
made in the 50s or set in the 50s. But 90% of those were sci-fi movies
and not particularly representative of the time period. And none of
those movies had a consumer copy machine. There would be no reason for
it to be referenced in a movie. So I just assumed they didn't exist.

I wonder what technology exists today, that never gets referenced in
movies would people 70 years from now would be surprised to know already
existed now in some form or another. Maybe fully electric cars.
Adam H. Kerman
2021-11-27 23:18:22 UTC
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Grolier had a guy dedicated to keeping the Xerox machines running.
I forgot to say that there were only two Xerox machines. One of Dr.
Xerox's duties was to polish the imaging drums every few hours with
Glasswax or something similar.
Every few hours? I had no idea. Great story. Burn it!
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-11-28 17:43:32 UTC
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Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I was sampling bits and pieces of the show and a commercial caught my
attention. The commercial was for a contest and the announcer told the
home audience to send in a product wrapper or a "facsimile" of the
wrapper. How would someone at home in 1954 send in a facsimile? I know
they don't mean a fax, but copy machines hadn't been invented yet (I
think) at least not ones the general public would have had easy access
to, so how would they do it?
First, they had to allow facsimiles because it was illegal in many
jurisdictions to require that something had to be purchased in order to
enter a contest or drawing. It was too much like gambling.
A facsimile could be as simple as you drawing a sketch of the wrapper
yourself. More often you'd just clip a picture of the product from a
newspaper or magazine.
There were copy machines in 1954, but they were alcohol-based. An
image would be created by heating the paper and burning an alcohol
wash. The phrase "burn this" was still being used in newsrooms to mean
"copy this" even well beyond the introduction of Xerox machines in the
'60s.
Thanks! I had no idea of any of this.
I know about life in the 50s from the handful of movies I watched either
made in the 50s or set in the 50s. But 90% of those were sci-fi movies
and not particularly representative of the time period. And none of
those movies had a consumer copy machine. There would be no reason for
it to be referenced in a movie. So I just assumed they didn't exist.
Ca. 1962 Xerox sponsored a series of dramas on (I think) CBS. Hardly
anyone then knew who or what Xerox was, or what it did. The Xerox ad
showed a kid on a conducted tour of a business that had a Xerox copy
machine. For some damn reason, the kid was carrying a large pet
turtle. As the tour moved on, the kid remained at the machine and, of
course, put his pet turtle on the glass and Xeroxed it. Out came a
picture of the underbelly of the turtle, and it had taken only seconds.
It was *awesome*. Nobody had ever seen a machine do anything like
that, not ever. The problem of Xerox's anonymity had been instantly
solved. It was a brilliant ad, as evidenced by the fact that it's been
sixty years and I can still tell you about it.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I wonder what technology exists today, that never gets referenced in
movies would people 70 years from now would be surprised to know already
existed now in some form or another. Maybe fully electric cars.
It's a good question. If you include "genetic engineering" in
technology, I think it'll be that. We'll be editing ourselves in due
course.
BTW Xerox machines are a lot less complicated than they used to be. In
1969-70 I had an afterschool job as a fileclerk at Grolier
Encyclopedia, "the source and authority for questions and answers used
on Jeopardy." (It was in the same building as DC Comics, too.)
Grolier had a guy dedicated to keeping the Xerox machines running.
They were huge, sucked lots of power, and would occasionally heat up so
much that something inside them would trip out, and it'd be half an
hour before they'd cooled down enough to use again. When was the last
time anybody had to worry about stuff like that?
My experience with the machines is from the early 90s when I was in high
school. I'd always be at the local library copying pages from books for
15 cents (or whatever it was) per page.

Now it's all Konica (for all I know, it was back then too). If there is
a hell, there is certainly a division in hell dedicated to manufacturing
office copy machines. Long gone are the days of just putting the paper
on the glass and pushing copy. The fine demons in the copier division
of hell made sure of that!
anim8rfsk
2021-11-27 20:06:53 UTC
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Post by Micky DuPree
. . .
It was a great show to stumble across if you were a 10-year-old in 1968
who liked superheroes (which I was). I've seen a few eps. since then,
and while it's very nostalgic for me, it's like coming across a specimen
trapped in amber. You couldn't interest kids today in the original
series, and as far as adults are concerned, I'd only recommend it for
ITC history buffs. In fact, apart from _The Prisoner_, just about the
only ITC import from that era that I've seen and that I think can hold
an adult's interest today is _Man in a Suitcase_, which isn't that well
known. There are still some ITC dramas that I'd like to sample, but
even with YouTube, there's always the problem of finding the time.
I have *never* heard of the Man in a Suitcase. But The Prisoner is high
on my list of TV shows I want to revisit...Youtube brings up some very
interesting results for MiaS...Looks like I found a random episode, but
it's weird. I was expecting a British show, but it appears to be
American. And even weirder the voices almost sound dubbed. I hate bad ADR!

Obviously you'll recognize Ron Grainer.
From Lew Grade's ITC Entertainment for ITV, 1967-68 and sold to ABC for
American broadcast summer 1968. ITC wanted to produce another series.
Danger Man had ended as Patrick McGoohan was producing and starring in
The Prisoner, not for Lew Grade.
I really should track it down as it's something I've been curious about
for years.
I was going to say I have this on my hard drive but I was thinking of

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060005/


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-11-28 17:51:34 UTC
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Post by Micky DuPree
. . .
It was a great show to stumble across if you were a 10-year-old in 1968
who liked superheroes (which I was). I've seen a few eps. since then,
and while it's very nostalgic for me, it's like coming across a specimen
trapped in amber. You couldn't interest kids today in the original
series, and as far as adults are concerned, I'd only recommend it for
ITC history buffs. In fact, apart from _The Prisoner_, just about the
only ITC import from that era that I've seen and that I think can hold
an adult's interest today is _Man in a Suitcase_, which isn't that well
known. There are still some ITC dramas that I'd like to sample, but
even with YouTube, there's always the problem of finding the time.
I have *never* heard of the Man in a Suitcase. But The Prisoner is high
on my list of TV shows I want to revisit...Youtube brings up some very
interesting results for MiaS...Looks like I found a random episode, but
it's weird. I was expecting a British show, but it appears to be
American. And even weirder the voices almost sound dubbed. I hate bad ADR!
http://youtu.be/6L8YTd0rfK0
Obviously you'll recognize Ron Grainer.
Not by name. But I definitely recognize and like some of the theme
songs he wrote. I had no idea Doctor Who and The Prisoner had the same
composer.

I actually really like some of the Who themes. My favorite is the
closing theme from the early 80s. Right around the 40 second mark the
music hits a crescendo that I love:

From Lew Grade's ITC Entertainment for ITV, 1967-68 and sold to ABC for
American broadcast summer 1968. ITC wanted to produce another series.
Danger Man had ended as Patrick McGoohan was producing and starring in
The Prisoner, not for Lew Grade.
I really should track it down as it's something I've been curious about
for years.
Adam H. Kerman
2021-11-28 18:08:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by Micky DuPree
. . .
It was a great show to stumble across if you were a 10-year-old in 1968
who liked superheroes (which I was). I've seen a few eps. since then,
and while it's very nostalgic for me, it's like coming across a specimen
trapped in amber. You couldn't interest kids today in the original
series, and as far as adults are concerned, I'd only recommend it for
ITC history buffs. In fact, apart from _The Prisoner_, just about the
only ITC import from that era that I've seen and that I think can hold
an adult's interest today is _Man in a Suitcase_, which isn't that well
known. There are still some ITC dramas that I'd like to sample, but
even with YouTube, there's always the problem of finding the time.
I have *never* heard of the Man in a Suitcase. But The Prisoner is high
on my list of TV shows I want to revisit...Youtube brings up some very
interesting results for MiaS...Looks like I found a random episode, but
it's weird. I was expecting a British show, but it appears to be
American. And even weirder the voices almost sound dubbed. I hate bad ADR!
http://youtu.be/6L8YTd0rfK0
Obviously you'll recognize Ron Grainer.
Not by name. But I definitely recognize and like some of the theme
songs he wrote. I had no idea Doctor Who and The Prisoner had the same
composer.
Heh. It's hard to think of a UK tv series from the '60s and '70s, drama
or action-adventure, that he didn't write the theme for. Well, he didn't
write The Saint (Edwin Astley) or the famous theme for Emma Peel on The
Avengers. That was Laurie Johnson. The Cathy Gale music was the Johnny
Dankworth jazz score. I have no idea what the series 1 music was.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I actually really like some of the Who themes. My favorite is the
closing theme from the early 80s. Right around the 40 second mark the
http://youtu.be/4CyS7IQ_Qw4
From Lew Grade's ITC Entertainment for ITV, 1967-68 and sold to ABC for
American broadcast summer 1968. ITC wanted to produce another series.
Danger Man had ended as Patrick McGoohan was producing and starring in
The Prisoner, not for Lew Grade.
I really should track it down as it's something I've been curious about
for years.
Micky DuPree
2021-11-27 10:29:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
I always thought of Jerry Lewis as a movie star. Although I watched
all of his movies on TV.
Interesting. What are the standout roles in your memory? I don't
remember ever seeing the Martin & Lewis Show (had to look up its
real name: _The Colgate Comedy Hour_) in syndication, so it would
have been hard to experience Jerry Lewis as a TV star in the '80s
even in reruns, unless you count his telethons for muscular
dystrophy.
Off the top of my head, The Nutty Professor and Visit to a Small
Planet. I know I watched one or two Marin and Lewis movies, but I
couldn't tell you which ones. I also Know I saw the Lewis movie where
he formed his own private army during WWII. And I think one where he
was a clown. I'm sure there are others that I'm blanking on. There
were also the telethons, but from my perspective he was a at least
former, movie star. I doubt I had much awareness of a TV show. I
certainly never saw it.
Jerry Lewis tried a TV series twice. Both were variety shows. The
first one was IIRC on ABC, was live, two or three hours long, and was
very Vegas-y. The second, a much more traditional variety show, was on
NBC, was an hour long, and was pre-recorded. The best thing on it was
a continuing sketch about a villain named Ralph Rotten, played by
Jerry. Unfortunately, the show was tanking. They tried to change
things up by doing it live on tape (a la Carol Burnett) in front of a
live audience. This meant they couldn't do Ralph Rotten anymore
because, for one thing, the sketches required a lot of cutting and, for
another, Ralph's makeup took forever.
I think the mistake everybody made was trying to make Jerry Lewis be
Dean Martin. I think Jerry might have done very well in a dramedy in
which he wasn't playing himself.
Arguably, he was playing both the Martin role and the Lewis role in _The
Nutty Professor_, and it seemed important to *him* to be recognized as
having that range (though the plot resolved on the side of the geek
persona). Lewis toured with the movie, and gave live talks to the
audience (straight up, not in geek mode) during the intermission of some
of the matinee showings. I can only speculate in hindsight that while
he wanted to beef up the box office, his main reason for the live talks
was to demostrate to the public that he was neither the geek nor the
suave lounge lizard in the movie, but an actor who wanted to be taken
seriously. My mom brought me and my younger brother to see the movie
because she wanted to see Lewis live and evidently couldn't get a
sitter. But even though I was about five or six at the time, I already
knew who Jerry Lewis was and what his basic onscreen shtick was.

Kind of like the case with Lucille Ball, Lewis never ran out of fans,
but as the '60s ended and the '70s began, I don't think the broad,
signature Jerry Lewis geek persona was still wowing the audience like it
had back in the '50s. Yet the audience (or maybe the studios with the
money) also had trouble accepting him as anything else. He still did
well, still did movies, but I just don't remember people buzzing about
him anymore. I remember it became something of a running pop culture
gag about how the French thought he was a comedic genius, while
Americans thought the French were daft.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Just today I learned there is a new movie being made based on an old
60s sci-fi show called "The Champions." I never heard of that show
until today. I'm sure I would have watched had it aired when I was a
kid. But too late now. I wouldn't sample it even if I could. But I'll
probably watch the movie. LOL!
The Champions was a Brit series that ran as a summer replacement on
NBC in 1968. (I think they reran the first season the following year.)
I don't recall that it made any impression at all -- unlike, say, The
Prisoner, which the U.S. first saw as a summer replacement for Jackie
Gleason's variety hour.
I think it's definitely one of the lesser known ITC dramas, which is
saying something.
BTW one of the lead actors on The Champions, Stuart Damon, hit it big
on the American soap opera General Hospital, on which he played a
doctor for 30 years. Damon died last June.
Aw, that's too bad. I'm glad he got steady work, though.
I see why they're trying to make a Champions movie, though, as the
agents have super-powers. BTW if they ever rerun the original series,
look for Dave Prowse in ep 2 as a weightlifter who is completely
outdone by the puny-looking Champions guys. (Prowse is also in ep 25
as a big, evil Arab.) I should add in here somewhere that I thought
the series was awful, with not nearly enough super-stuff.
Had I been five years older at the time, I probably would have agreed.
However, as I think back over the premise, using their powers sparingly
was probably wise if the point was to get maximum value out of those
powers as secret agents rather than as costumed fighters of street
crime. But even with the restrained approach, that makes it sound like
all their opponents would be overmatched unless the series introduced
supervillain(s), which I have no memory of them doing.

-Micky
Adam H. Kerman
2021-10-31 18:43:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by A Friend
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over. James
Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy couple. For
me it continues to have the problem that I just don't think Lucy is
funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought Lucy
was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could deliver a
joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_ fit
well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had come
home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up their
factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere. Lucy
Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always put
back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of people
are comfortable with that.
I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in the
'70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time ago,
so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of, "Oh my
god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the fan, saying,
"You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she appreciated the
difference.
A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star of
the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried. Jerry
Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
Richard Crenna turned to drama, and I remember how controversial his
casting in The Sand Pebbles was. Clint Eastwood also made the
transition.
A better example would have been Robert Redford who was a supporting
player on television and in movies, not well known, when he was cast in
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.
How is Redford a better example than Crenna?
Huh? You had topic-drifted away from discussing Richard Crenna at that
point into discussing Clint Eastwood. Redford is a better example for
your purposes than Eastwood.
Despite years of work,
Redford was still unknown when he scored in Butch Cassidy. Crenna had
become famous from Our Miss Brooks and The Real McCoys. Crenna had a
ton of expectations to overcome, but he delivered in The Sand Pebbles.
That's a great movie. We discussed it a while back when I posted about
it.
Clint absolutely did not make the transition in Hollywood. He went to
Italy, and only then could he be considered bankable in Hollywood.
We differ on whether a transition has to be direct or not. Clint
worked in Europe because no one in the U.S. would hire him. He showed
'em.
If you're trying get me to disagree with "Hollywood gets it wrong a
whole lot of the time," that's not going to happen.
Micky DuPree
2021-11-12 20:21:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by A Friend
In article
I am halfway through FOREVER DARLING With Lucy and Desi as a
quarreling couple looking to annihilate insects the world over.
James Mason is her guardian angel trying to keep them a happy
couple. For me it continues to have the problem that I just don't
think Lucy is funny.
I spent much of my earlier life puzzling over why people thought
Lucy was funny. She was a skilled actress, yes, and she could
deliver a joke. But Lucy Ricardo simply wasn't funny.
I've read some academic work that seems to think that _I Love Lucy_
fit well with the national narrative at the time that the menfolk had
come home from the war, so it was time for the womenfolk to give up
their factory jobs and confine themselves to the domestic sphere.
Lucy Ricardo kept farcically trying to defy this norm, but was always
put back in her place. It was a form of punching down, but a lot of
people are comfortable with that.
I'm not an expert on her work, but my impression is that Lucille Ball
was a competent B movie lead or A movie supporting actress who never
rose to the A list in that medium. _I Love Lucy_ made her one of the
biggest names in show business, but it still didn't translate into a
more illustrious career on the big screen. On a talk show back in
the '70s(?) (it may have been Mike Douglas, but it was a looonng time
ago, so I can't pin it down) a fan gushed something to the effect of,
"Oh my god, you're my favorite movie star," and she corrected the
fan, saying, "You're very kind, but I'm actually a TV star," so she
appreciated the difference.
A lot of the huge TV stars of the '50s, e.g., Milton Berle, could not
sustain that kind of cultural centrality. They didn't starve in the
'60s, but the country moved on.
All of this is well taken, I think. I can't recall a TV comedy star
of the '50s who made it big in the movies, although many tried. Jerry
Lewis sort-of did and sort-of didn't.
I just scanned Lewis' IMDb credits. Like the others, he certainly didn't
starve, but he ceased being near the center of American pop culture. I
think his best remembered solo project is still _The Nutty Professor_
(1963) though he kept on working through 2016.
Post by A Friend
Richard Crenna turned to drama, and I remember how controversial his
casting in The Sand Pebbles was.
The controversy was before my time (I'm about five years younger than
you). A friend with a massive video collection sent me a package of
DVDs of "crusader" shows from the '60s, including Crenna as a state
legislator in _Slattery's People_, in which creator James E. Moser
tries to do for political drama what he did for medical drama in _Ben
Casey_. I thought _Slattery's People_ and Crenna were quite good by the
standards of the day, but it only lasted two seasons. Maybe it helps me
be objective that I wasn't old enough to have caught _Our Miss Brooks_
first-run.
Post by A Friend
Clint Eastwood also made the transition.
He got famous a little later than Lucille Ball and Richard Crenna,
and -- I haven't made a survey or anything -- but it might be easier to
make the transition if you're already better known for drama than for
comedy.

James Garner had a respectable film career, but he's still best
remembered for his TV dramas (which often veered into comedy back before
the word "dramedy" was coined).
Post by A Friend
I also wanted to mention that, when I was a kid in the '60s, I Love
Lucy ran all the time. The series was central to CBS's incredibly
lucrative deal to syndicate its past programming to independent
stations in, I think, 1966.
Yeah, I only caught _I Love Lucy_ in syndication, back when it was on
local channels after school.
Post by A Friend
Nowadays the show runs only here and there, sometimes only overnight,
as if they're still programming it because they think they have to.
When Viacom started trying to deliver audiences by age demographic,
Nickelodeon was for primary-school kids, MTV was shooting for teens, VH1
for 20-somethings, and Nick at Nite and then TV Land were for 35+. But
that's a moving target. I can remember some '50s shows on TV Land when
it started up, but I just now glanced at the TV Land schedule, and while
they have some things from the '60s, they seem to consider the '90s
retro and fair game now. If you want a lot of stuff from the '50s -
'70s, you need to find a local digital subchannel with MeTV, Antenna TV,
or something like that.

_I Love Lucy_ still has a draw with some boomers and their surviving
parents on the nostalgia channels, but all of that is competing with an
unprecedented deluge of new programming. I don't think I've rewatched
anything since the '00s. The only things I've watched from the old days
are shows that I never watched before, like the first season of _Danger
Man_.
Post by A Friend
The modern audience really doesn't care about I Love Lucy at all.
It's one of two 1950s sitcoms (the other being _The Honeymooners_) that
the younger generations *may* have heard of, but no, they're unlikely to
have watched it. As Arthur notes, there's a cultural disconnect
starting around the time he grew up watching old programming in
syndication.

The professor I used to work for called it the "Fred Ott's Sneeze"
phenomenon. When a medium is new, people are fascinated with whatever
it puts out merely because it's new. "Fred Ott's Sneeze" was one of the
first motion picture clips ever produced, and it fascinated the people
who saw it, despite the fact that all it was was an Edison employee
sneezing. When movies were new, people flocked to nickelodeons to see
pretty boring stuff. It took a while for the medium to mature.

Same thing with television in the late '40s and '50s. Though it had
many similarities with movies, it was still new, it was right there in
your living room, and unlike movies, a lot of it was live. By the
1960s, though, the medium had grown up a little, and _The Milton Berle
Show_ already looked crude and old-fashioned. _I Love Lucy_ was made on
film, so it looked better than kinescopes from the '50s, but Lucille
Ball was no longer at the center of the medium. Her later sitcoms still
did quite well -- she was consistently on the air from 1962-1974, but by
the end of _Here's Lucy_, the country was drawn to _All in the Family_,
_The Mary Tyler Moore Show_, and _M*A*S*H_ instead.

-Micky

--
"Fred Ott's Sneeze"

Neill Massello
2021-10-17 20:30:28 UTC
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Permalink
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
I predict disharmony.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-17 21:10:06 UTC
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Post by Neill Massello
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
I predict disharmony.
Or maybe even dat harmony.


“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
anim8rfsk
2021-10-18 20:35:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
It was OK. Lacey is really smart. But Melissa Joan Hart is really lucky and
won more than $1 million for her charity.
NCIS Los Angeles - Fukushu
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
The worst episode of any NCIS series that has ever been made or ever will
be made. They couldn’t make a worse episode then this if they tried which
apparently in this case they were.
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM’s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it’s going to be gloriously terrible.
Boy did I call that.

I’m watching an absolutely terrible Russian movie

But first I had to sit through a metric woman girl splaining to me why I’m
a racist if I turn it off

It’s three hours long. It only has 140 cuts in it so each shot averages 2.5
minutes. Of ugly static sepia.

15 minutes in and we get the first line of dialogue. It’s in Russian.

Let the fast forwarding begin!

Now there’s literally 10 minutes of close-ups of faces of people that are
sitting on an open flat car and the train going somewhere and saying
nothing

And abruptly and without warning in a shocking surprise at the 42 minute
mark they spring for color film

It’s like the Wizard of Oz if the Wizard of Oz was plodding over long mess
and not in English despite it’s saying it’s in English

At the 90 minute mark they’ve gone back to sepia

Thank God it was really only two hours and 45 minutes. I don’t think I
could’ve lasted a minute longer. Although it looks like I am being handed
an ending lecture on why I’m a racist.

The ending lecture was on how watching three minute cuts in ECU of peoples
faces doing nothing and saying nothing while listening to trains go click
clack click clack is mesmerizing

I don’t think that word means what she thinks it means

She did tell us that halfway through the movie the lab ruined the
processing and they had to start over. The Director says they did things
differently the second time and it’s so much better film because of it.

God help us that we should have to suffer the original.




“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
Arthur Lipscomb
2021-10-19 18:58:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
It was OK. Lacey is really smart. But Melissa Joan Hart is really lucky and
won more than $1 million for her charity.
NCIS Los Angeles - Fukushu
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
The worst episode of any NCIS series that has ever been made or ever will
be made. They couldn’t make a worse episode then this if they tried which
apparently in this case they were.
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM’s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it’s going to be gloriously terrible.
Boy did I call that.
I’m watching an absolutely terrible Russian movie
But first I had to sit through a metric woman girl splaining to me why I’m
a racist if I turn it off
It’s three hours long. It only has 140 cuts in it so each shot averages 2.5
minutes. Of ugly static sepia.
And that sealed the deal for me not watching it! You forgot to mention
it was also in full frame.
Post by anim8rfsk
15 minutes in and we get the first line of dialogue. It’s in Russian.
You sat through 15 minutes of this nonsense?
Post by anim8rfsk
Let the fast forwarding begin!
I used the skip ahead button. More efficient that way.


You lasted way longer than I did.
anim8rfsk
2021-10-20 01:47:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Celebrity wheel of fortune with Melissa Joan Hart, Titus Burgess, and Lacey
Chabert
It was OK. Lacey is really smart. But Melissa Joan Hart is really lucky and
won more than $1 million for her charity.
NCIS Los Angeles - Fukushu
(Tomorrow will be the first NCISOWM without Gibbs. We’ll see how long it
takes it to crash and burn!)
The worst episode of any NCIS series that has ever been made or ever will
be made. They couldn’t make a worse episode then this if they tried which
apparently in this case they were.
Stalker (1982) some thing on TCM with a bunch of godless Ruskies as time
travelers. I assume this is part of TCM’s Halloween offerings. It frankly
looks like it’s going to be gloriously terrible.
Boy did I call that.
I’m watching an absolutely terrible Russian movie
But first I had to sit through a metric woman girl splaining to me why I’m
a racist if I turn it off
It’s three hours long. It only has 140 cuts in it so each shot averages 2.5
minutes. Of ugly static sepia.
And that sealed the deal for me not watching it! You forgot to mention
it was also in full frame.
Ian’s IMDb article says it was shot 1:37
I don’t remember how it was presented
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
15 minutes in and we get the first line of dialogue. It’s in Russian.
You sat through 15 minutes of this nonsense?
I didn’t wanna let you down. It was pretty hard though.
Post by Arthur Lipscomb
Post by anim8rfsk
Let the fast forwarding begin!
I used the skip ahead button. More efficient that way.
You lasted way longer than I did.
I hear that a lot.
--
“The last thing I want to do is hurt you, but it’s still on my list.”
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