Discussion:
Coronet Blue "Tomoyo"
(too old to reply)
Adam H. Kerman
2018-06-14 06:47:32 UTC
Permalink
I think I'm turning Japanese.

Fifth scheduled to air, seventh in production order. Another complete
obscurity: Like "Where You From and What You Done?" it was scheduled to
air twice, pre-empted both times.

Sitting in a cafe outdoors, Michael listens to Max expound. Max wants
Michael to stop searching for himself and create a life for himself
the way he is; ge a girl. The Max character has no social life, not even
a home, so I'm not sure he's the right person to advise Michael.

A very young Japanese woman with a red case catches Michael's eye. He'll
learn she's the title character (Cely Carrillo, actually several years
older than Frank Converse). Michael catches her eye; they recognize each
other. Michael chases her, frightening her. He follows her to a
nondescript building with a small sign about an athletic club. He can't
get in, but climbs up a convenient outside stairs (it's not a fire
escape and I have no idea why they're there) and looks through the
clerestory to see a group practicing karate moves. It's led by Raffie, a
man who perpetually wears sunglasses indoors, expected to be blinded by
a sudden flash of a strobe light? I have no idea. It's Dan Travanty,
later to be credited as Daniel J. Travanti (Furillo).

Raffi speaks in a nasal voice, tightly restricts his tone to a few notes
within a very limited range. I'm not sure why Travanti thinks this makes
him sound particularly tough and dangerous, but of course on Hill Street
Blues, he gave a deliberately stilted performance, less nasal with the
voice, usually standing extremely still like the synths on Humans.

I swear Wentworth Miller's Leonard Snart is based on Travanti's
performance in this episode.

Tomoyo points out Michael; Raffie leads men outside to confront him.
Half of the group attack Michael, but muscle memory, uh, kicks in and
Michael defends himself. The other half beat him soundly, knocking him
out. When Michael recovers, he finds the red case. It's got small
brushes in it for Japanese caligraphy and drawings.

Back at Max's restaurant, there are more dancers and one waitress wearing
the Victorian maid's garb. Max (I assume) knows a young Japanese man,
credited as The Student (Sam Shimono who has 115 credits and is still
in show business) who translates what's found in the red box, although
Michael seems to know him as well. He reads the name off the drawings;
Michael looks it up in a phone book. It's a karate school run by Yasito
Omaki (Keye Luke), who turns out to be Tomoyo's father. She's pretending
not to recognize Michael. Raffie is his main instructor. Michael tells a
series of absurd lies about why he wishes to learn karate, which are seen
through immediately. It is explained that their fists are registered with
the police as lethal weapons, a line I've heard on tv and movies (never
on radio), but I've always questioned what possible forensic value there
can be to fist registration.

None of the men in the class appear to have been dancers at Max's
restaurant, so they're going all out on the budget for extras this week.
There's also a pretty woman in the class. Keye Luke's instruction
consists of him sitting still, looking stoic, lowering one student's arm
when it's too high, but I have no idea what part of the body they were
training to strike.

Michael is told to fill out a lengthy application with Tomoyo.

In conversations with Tomoyo, she obliquely refers to the fight the
other day. She and Raffie aren't a loving couple but he controls her. We
get the hint later that Raffie thinks Michael was investigating him;
Tomoyo can't convince Raffie that Michael was after her.

Tomoyo agrees to accompany Michael to Max's restaurant. Hey! This time
the dancers are dancing to an instrumental of our show's main theme!

She sort of remembers Michael but tries to get Michael to say where. In
two separate recovered memory sequences, Michael keeps placing her face
in benign scenes that hint of danger; we get Max's restaurant's 2000 cup
coffee maker, further hinting that whatever memory Michael is grasping for,
he's substituting familiar but irrelevant details.

Raffie shows up to get Tomoyo.

In class, Michael seems to know how to fall but Keye Luke criticizes him
for being tense, which wastes energy and will cause him to lose the
fight.

The master invites Michael to a saki ceremony in his home, explaining
how this establishes friendship. The master wants Michael to start
revealing himself and what he wants. Tomoyo, now dressed in ceremonial
garb we see in movies, serves them but lets the men talk.

He shows Michael how to draw but Tomoyo lies to him about where the red
case is; later Michael says that he has it.

Michael returns to the athletic club; some guy eating a sandwich is
guarding the place; Michael can't get in. Raffie later confronts Tomoyo
and Michael, separately, about spying on him.

In class, Raffie is now Michael's personal instructor. He deliberately
breaks Michael's left arm but the master denies that it was intensional.
The master knows nothing about the athletic club.

Back at Max's restaurant, Michael kisses Tomoyo but continues to grill
her. Overhearing, Max tells Michael that she's playing on his sympathies
and trying to trick him into returning to the athletic club but Michael
heads there anyway.

Max sees Tomoyo make a phone call after Michael left.

Raffi and henchmen walk down a street in a very orchestrated manner.
They're going somewhere with purpose!

Michael follows.

They're heading to the athletic club! I have no idea why Michael started
following them from two blocks back. The security guard, having finished
his sandwich, sees Michael follow them. He fails to prevent Michael from
entering the now unlocked door of the athletic club. He follows Michael
up the interior staircase. Michael enters the unlocked club followed by
the guard who tells him to go ahead; they're just practicing with a body
bag. Michael accuses a confused Raffi of being "out for me".

Raffi tells him he's a menace and all the men begin circling.

Wow! It's now a very serious situation because Raffi takes off the
sunglasses! Finally Michael's fogging memory clears a little and the
enemy in the memory is someone else, but Michael still recalls the same
pair of sunglasses.

Michael refuses to fight, just tells Raffi that the sunglasses are the
same. Raffi attacks, Michael defends against Raffi and another and gets
the better of them (briefly) with one arm! There's a man in a black suit
taking out all the henchman! It's the master! Michael is saved!

Of course, the master's humiliation is that Raffi was such a lousy
instructor. Michael reveals the plot, that Raffi was training them to be
collectors for the Mafia! Where the hell did Michael learn this?

Michael finally realizes that Tomoyo wasn't the woman in his memory, not
that she clears up any hints that she remembered Michael, and thanks her
and her father, having learned Dorothy's lesson from The Wizard of Oz.

And we get the ubiquitous Michael Walking Away footage in Central Park,
absurd because of Michael's broken arm.

The fight sequences are credited as both karate and judo.

I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
W/Q
2018-06-14 15:28:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I think I'm turning Japanese.
Fifth scheduled to air, seventh in production order. Another complete
obscurity: Like "Where You From and What You Done?" it was scheduled to
air twice, pre-empted both times.
Sitting in a cafe outdoors, Michael listens to Max expound. Max wants
Michael to stop searching for himself and create a life for himself
the way he is; ge a girl. The Max character has no social life, not even
a home, so I'm not sure he's the right person to advise Michael.
A very young Japanese woman with a red case catches Michael's eye. He'll
learn she's the title character (Cely Carrillo, actually several years
older than Frank Converse). Michael catches her eye; they recognize each
other. Michael chases her, frightening her. He follows her to a
nondescript building with a small sign about an athletic club. He can't
get in, but climbs up a convenient outside stairs (it's not a fire
escape and I have no idea why they're there) and looks through the
clerestory to see a group practicing karate moves. It's led by Raffie, a
man who perpetually wears sunglasses indoors, expected to be blinded by
a sudden flash of a strobe light? I have no idea. It's Dan Travanty,
later to be credited as Daniel J. Travanti (Furillo).
Raffi speaks in a nasal voice, tightly restricts his tone to a few notes
within a very limited range. I'm not sure why Travanti thinks this makes
him sound particularly tough and dangerous, but of course on Hill Street
Blues, he gave a deliberately stilted performance, less nasal with the
voice, usually standing extremely still like the synths on Humans.
I swear Wentworth Miller's Leonard Snart is based on Travanti's
performance in this episode.
Tomoyo points out Michael; Raffie leads men outside to confront him.
Half of the group attack Michael, but muscle memory, uh, kicks in and
Michael defends himself. The other half beat him soundly, knocking him
out. When Michael recovers, he finds the red case. It's got small
brushes in it for Japanese caligraphy and drawings.
Back at Max's restaurant, there are more dancers and one waitress wearing
the Victorian maid's garb. Max (I assume) knows a young Japanese man,
credited as The Student (Sam Shimono who has 115 credits and is still
in show business) who translates what's found in the red box, although
Michael seems to know him as well. He reads the name off the drawings;
Michael looks it up in a phone book. It's a karate school run by Yasito
Omaki (Keye Luke), who turns out to be Tomoyo's father. She's pretending
not to recognize Michael. Raffie is his main instructor. Michael tells a
series of absurd lies about why he wishes to learn karate, which are seen
through immediately. It is explained that their fists are registered with
the police as lethal weapons, a line I've heard on tv and movies (never
on radio), but I've always questioned what possible forensic value there
can be to fist registration.
None of the men in the class appear to have been dancers at Max's
restaurant, so they're going all out on the budget for extras this week.
There's also a pretty woman in the class. Keye Luke's instruction
consists of him sitting still, looking stoic, lowering one student's arm
when it's too high, but I have no idea what part of the body they were
training to strike.
Michael is told to fill out a lengthy application with Tomoyo.
In conversations with Tomoyo, she obliquely refers to the fight the
other day. She and Raffie aren't a loving couple but he controls her. We
get the hint later that Raffie thinks Michael was investigating him;
Tomoyo can't convince Raffie that Michael was after her.
Tomoyo agrees to accompany Michael to Max's restaurant. Hey! This time
the dancers are dancing to an instrumental of our show's main theme!
She sort of remembers Michael but tries to get Michael to say where. In
two separate recovered memory sequences, Michael keeps placing her face
in benign scenes that hint of danger; we get Max's restaurant's 2000 cup
coffee maker, further hinting that whatever memory Michael is grasping for,
he's substituting familiar but irrelevant details.
Raffie shows up to get Tomoyo.
In class, Michael seems to know how to fall but Keye Luke criticizes him
for being tense, which wastes energy and will cause him to lose the
fight.
The master invites Michael to a saki ceremony in his home, explaining
how this establishes friendship. The master wants Michael to start
revealing himself and what he wants. Tomoyo, now dressed in ceremonial
garb we see in movies, serves them but lets the men talk.
He shows Michael how to draw but Tomoyo lies to him about where the red
case is; later Michael says that he has it.
Michael returns to the athletic club; some guy eating a sandwich is
guarding the place; Michael can't get in. Raffie later confronts Tomoyo
and Michael, separately, about spying on him.
In class, Raffie is now Michael's personal instructor. He deliberately
breaks Michael's left arm but the master denies that it was intensional.
The master knows nothing about the athletic club.
Back at Max's restaurant, Michael kisses Tomoyo but continues to grill
her. Overhearing, Max tells Michael that she's playing on his sympathies
and trying to trick him into returning to the athletic club but Michael
heads there anyway.
Max sees Tomoyo make a phone call after Michael left.
Raffi and henchmen walk down a street in a very orchestrated manner.
They're going somewhere with purpose!
Michael follows.
They're heading to the athletic club! I have no idea why Michael started
following them from two blocks back. The security guard, having finished
his sandwich, sees Michael follow them. He fails to prevent Michael from
entering the now unlocked door of the athletic club. He follows Michael
up the interior staircase. Michael enters the unlocked club followed by
the guard who tells him to go ahead; they're just practicing with a body
bag. Michael accuses a confused Raffi of being "out for me".
Raffi tells him he's a menace and all the men begin circling.
Wow! It's now a very serious situation because Raffi takes off the
sunglasses! Finally Michael's fogging memory clears a little and the
enemy in the memory is someone else, but Michael still recalls the same
pair of sunglasses.
Michael refuses to fight, just tells Raffi that the sunglasses are the
same. Raffi attacks, Michael defends against Raffi and another and gets
the better of them (briefly) with one arm! There's a man in a black suit
taking out all the henchman! It's the master! Michael is saved!
Of course, the master's humiliation is that Raffi was such a lousy
instructor. Michael reveals the plot, that Raffi was training them to be
collectors for the Mafia! Where the hell did Michael learn this?
Michael finally realizes that Tomoyo wasn't the woman in his memory, not
that she clears up any hints that she remembered Michael, and thanks her
and her father, having learned Dorothy's lesson from The Wizard of Oz.
And we get the ubiquitous Michael Walking Away footage in Central Park,
absurd because of Michael's broken arm.
The fight sequences are credited as both karate and judo.
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
You could've saved yourself a lot of time, and a lot of watching pointless bad TV, by just doing a Google search for the secret.

The mystery is resolved in a passage about Coronet Blue from a biography of TV creator and writer Larry Cohen, "The Radical Allegories of an Independent Filmmaker."

"When the Brodkin Organization took over the series, they wanted to turn it into an anthology... so they played down the amnesia aspect until there was nothing about it at all in the show. It was just Frank Converse wandering from one story to the next with no connective format at all. Anyway, the show ended after seventeen weeks and nobody found out what 'coronet blue' meant. The actual secret is that Converse was not really an American at all. He was a Russian who had been trained to appear like an American and was sent to the U.S. as a spy. He belonged to a spy unit called 'Coronet Blue.' He decided to defect, so the Russians tried to kill him before he can give away the identities of the other Soviet agents. And nobody can really identify him because he doesn't exist as an American. Coronet Blue was actually an outgrowth of 'The Traitor' episode of The Defenders."

http://wesclark.com/webnoir/coronet_blue.html
anim8rfsk
2018-06-14 17:10:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I think I'm turning Japanese.
Fifth scheduled to air, seventh in production order. Another complete
obscurity: Like "Where You From and What You Done?" it was scheduled to
air twice, pre-empted both times.
Sitting in a cafe outdoors, Michael listens to Max expound. Max wants
Michael to stop searching for himself and create a life for himself
the way he is; ge a girl. The Max character has no social life, not even
a home, so I'm not sure he's the right person to advise Michael.
A very young Japanese woman with a red case catches Michael's eye. He'll
learn she's the title character (Cely Carrillo, actually several years
https://www.picclickimg.com/d/l400/pict/112624948815_/Cely-Carrillo-Unite
d-States-Steel-Hour-1962-CBS.jpg

Search says people who search for Cely Carrillo also search for Elsa
Martinelli. Why? Because they both have double L's in their name?
What is this, Clark Kent's dating service?

This is her last credit on IMDb. Looks like she turned 30 and dropped
out of filmbiz.

I'm going to have to track down RAMPAGE if only for the cast:

Robert Mitchum, Elsa Martinelli, Jack Hawkins, Sabu, Cely Carillo and
Sylva Koscina as "Stewardess" written (uncredited) by the guy that
invented Star Trek's mirror universe!
Post by Adam H. Kerman
older than Frank Converse). Michael catches her eye; they recognize each
other. Michael chases her, frightening her. He follows her to a
nondescript building with a small sign about an athletic club. He can't
get in, but climbs up a convenient outside stairs (it's not a fire
escape and I have no idea why they're there) and looks through the
clerestory to see a group practicing karate moves. It's led by Raffie, a
man who perpetually wears sunglasses indoors, expected to be blinded by
a sudden flash of a strobe light? I have no idea. It's Dan Travanty,
later to be credited as Daniel J. Travanti (Furillo).
He'll always be the space hippy to me.
Loading Image...
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Raffi speaks in a nasal voice, tightly restricts his tone to a few notes
within a very limited range. I'm not sure why Travanti thinks this makes
him sound particularly tough and dangerous, but of course on Hill Street
Blues, he gave a deliberately stilted performance, less nasal with the
voice, usually standing extremely still like the synths on Humans.
I swear Wentworth Miller's Leonard Snart is based on Travanti's
performance in this episode.
hee hee
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Tomoyo points out Michael; Raffie leads men outside to confront him.
Half of the group attack Michael, but muscle memory, uh, kicks in and
Michael defends himself.
I'm thinking this is the Godless Ruskie infiltrator training in action.

The other half beat him soundly, knocking him
Post by Adam H. Kerman
out. When Michael recovers, he finds the red case.
Right where he hid it after she dropped it, instead of waving it over
his head as he chased her "Miss! Miss!! You dropped your package!!!"

It's got small
Post by Adam H. Kerman
brushes in it for Japanese caligraphy and drawings.
So every part of this could have potentially been avoided by a single
line of dialog. "She dropped her case" "I think I know her" "Hi guys"

As he wakens, they're playing the Coronet Blue theme oriental style,
picked out on a mandolin.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Back at Max's restaurant, there are more dancers and one waitress wearing
the Victorian maid's garb. Max (I assume) knows a young Japanese man,
credited as The Student (Sam Shimono who has 115 credits and is still
in show business) who translates what's found in the red box, although
Michael seems to know him as well. He reads the name off the drawings;
Michael looks it up in a phone book. It's a karate school run by Yasito
Omaki (Keye Luke),
Master Po! Did you know he was in the original King Kong?

who turns out to be Tomoyo's father. She's pretending
Post by Adam H. Kerman
not to recognize Michael. Raffie is his main instructor. Michael tells a
series of absurd lies about why he wishes to learn karate, which are seen
Once again, never tell the truth when a lie will do.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
through immediately. It is explained that their fists are registered with
the police as lethal weapons, a line I've heard on tv and movies (never
on radio), but I've always questioned what possible forensic value there
can be to fist registration.
Yeah. Registering the person so you have suspects when the coroner
rules 'beaten to death with empty hands' is more plausible, although I
don't for a minute believe they ever did that either.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
None of the men in the class appear to have been dancers at Max's
restaurant, so they're going all out on the budget for extras this week.
The guys that beat him up all seemed to be caucasians made up to look
vaguely Asian, although it might just be that they were all stuntmen.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
There's also a pretty woman in the class. Keye Luke's instruction
consists of him sitting still, looking stoic, lowering one student's arm
when it's too high, but I have no idea what part of the body they were
training to strike.
They have two blonde women, and they make a point of keeping them next
to each other, although I'm not sure what that accomplishes.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Michael is told to fill out a lengthy application with Tomoyo.
Where she says it's absolutely forbidden to fraternize with him, and
immediately goes to the EYE with him.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
In conversations with Tomoyo, she obliquely refers to the fight the
other day. She and Raffie aren't a loving couple but he controls her. We
get the hint later that Raffie thinks Michael was investigating him;
Tomoyo can't convince Raffie that Michael was after her.
Tomoyo agrees to accompany Michael to Max's restaurant. Hey! This time
the dancers are dancing to an instrumental of our show's main theme!
She sort of remembers Michael but tries to get Michael to say where. In
He slips in sly references to Coronets playing the Blue, but she doesn't
bite.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
two separate recovered memory sequences, Michael keeps placing her face
in benign scenes that hint of danger; we get Max's restaurant's 2000 cup
coffee maker, further hinting that whatever memory Michael is grasping for,
he's substituting familiar but irrelevant details.
It's kind of a fun sequence - as Michael stares at her, Max's dancers
vanish from behind her; she's all Michael can see. But the dancers are
still there when we see Michael from her point of view. Story of my
life.

Her manner of speech changes too, when she's speaking honestly to Mike
to when she's being the hipster daughter.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Raffie shows up to get Tomoyo.
And so subtly claims her.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
In class, Michael seems to know how to fall but Keye Luke criticizes him
for being tense, which wastes energy and will cause him to lose the
fight.
This doesn't work for me at all. We're supposed to buy that Mike
already knows how to fall, but Converse is doing a terrible job of it.
He's slapping the mat *way* too late to do any good. However, I learned
what Dojo means.

But it does work when Mike clobbers Arte while 'learning' the choking
defense. It's got to help that Mike is a head taller than his opponent.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
The master invites Michael to a saki ceremony in his home, explaining
how this establishes friendship. The master wants Michael to start
revealing himself and what he wants. Tomoyo, now dressed in ceremonial
garb we see in movies, serves them but lets the men talk.
He shows Michael how to draw but Tomoyo lies to him about where the red
case is; later Michael says that he has it.
Wow, I haven't Japanese brush painted in ... decades. Amazing the stuff
we forget about completely.

Master Po knows about the amnesia but not the red case.

Tomoyo's hair literally falls to her knees! Of course it helps that
she's only about 4' tall, but still ...
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Michael returns to the athletic club; some guy eating a sandwich is
guarding the place; Michael can't get in. Raffie later confronts Tomoyo
and Michael, separately, about spying on him.
In class, Raffie is now Michael's personal instructor. He deliberately
breaks Michael's left arm but the master denies that it was intensional.
The master knows nothing about the athletic club.
Best line: Tomoyo, to a guy who's just had his forearm broken but
untreated: "Does it hurt?"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Back at Max's restaurant, Michael kisses Tomoyo but continues to grill
her. Overhearing, Max tells Michael that she's playing on his sympathies
and trying to trick him into returning to the athletic club but Michael
heads there anyway.
Tomoyo: They'll kill you!
Mike: Best reason to go.
Max: It's a trap!
Mike: I hope not.

I'm getting some seriously mixed signals about Mike's intentions here.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Max sees Tomoyo make a phone call after Michael left.
It's the same phone booth against the brick wall.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Raffi and henchmen walk down a street in a very orchestrated manner.
They're going somewhere with purpose!
Okay, this is *so* weird. It may just be conservation of location, but
Michael is sitting at the outside table he was with Max in the
beginning, which I assumed was outside of the EYE I. The group walks
past him like the Earps headed for the OK Corral, and he follows them to
the Professional Mens Athletic Club Members Only like he did Tomoyo. So
... what if the Earps had come from the other way? And when he
announces inside the EYE I that he's going he meant ... to sit outside?
And he looks stupid with neither arm in his jacket.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Michael follows.
They're heading to the athletic club! I have no idea why Michael started
following them from two blocks back. The security guard, having finished
his sandwich, sees Michael follow them. He fails to prevent Michael from
entering the now unlocked door of the athletic club. He follows Michael
up the interior staircase. Michael enters the unlocked club followed by
the guard who tells him to go ahead; they're just practicing with a body
bag. Michael accuses a confused Raffi of being "out for me".
Raffi tells him he's a menace and all the men begin circling.
Wow! It's now a very serious situation because Raffi takes off the
sunglasses! Finally Michael's fogging memory clears a little and the
enemy in the memory is someone else, but Michael still recalls the same
pair of sunglasses.
Which he believes is a genuine memory, but since the guy is in the room
from the end of 2001 with the 2001 cup expresso maker and the juke box,
I'd have doubts about.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Michael refuses to fight, just tells Raffi that the sunglasses are the
same. Raffi attacks, Michael defends against Raffi and another and gets
the better of them (briefly) with one arm!
Guess those lessons are paying off. Me, I'd be flat on my back hopped
up on whatever the 1965 version of Percocet was.

There's a man in a black suit
Post by Adam H. Kerman
taking out all the henchman! It's the master! Michael is saved!
He swatted them down like grasshoppers.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Of course, the master's humiliation is that Raffi was such a lousy
instructor. Michael reveals the plot, that Raffi was training them to be
collectors for the Mafia! Where the hell did Michael learn this?
Yeah, I mean, wtf? At least they could have said Yakuza instead of
Mafia.

And why train quasi white guys in Karate to be Mafia enforcers? And
like they couldn't find somebody who would just train them above board.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Michael finally realizes that Tomoyo wasn't the woman in his memory, not
that she clears up any hints that she remembered Michael, and thanks her
and her father, having learned Dorothy's lesson from The Wizard of Oz.
And will she be allowed to share in the saki this time?
Post by Adam H. Kerman
And we get the ubiquitous Michael Walking Away footage in Central Park,
absurd because of Michael's broken arm.
First we get the 'Michael stares into the camera going through a series
of face poses that they're clearly calling out from behind the camera'
that we've seen before ... it makes sense for portraits, but what the
Hell are they doing it with a movie camera for?

Here's the big question - why the Hell did Tomoyo run when he shouted
'hey I know you' in the first place?
Post by Adam H. Kerman
The fight sequences are credited as both karate and judo.
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
And I thank you for taking me on this journey. I hadn't ever realized
there were unseen episodes on the end of my DVD set!
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2018-06-14 17:42:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
And I thank you for taking me on this journey. I hadn't ever realized
there were unseen episodes on the end of my DVD set!
This was fun.

Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.

Even more mysterious, I wonder why the network chose broadcast order?

Also, production order is clearly not intended airing order. Production
order, of course, is for convenience of when sets are made ready and
guest star availability and is meaningless for anything else.

. . . if it even was production order. We don't know what studio records
they had. There's just no way that the psychic act episode was intended
to air last, but I don't have a better suggestion.

I should note that Frank Converse just turned 80 a few weeks ago (as did
the guy playing the Japanese student in this episode), so let me wish
him health and happiness. Joe Silver died almost 20 years ago but Brian
Bedford only died two years ago.
anim8rfsk
2018-06-14 18:21:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
And I thank you for taking me on this journey. I hadn't ever realized
there were unseen episodes on the end of my DVD set!
This was fun.
Ditto
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Even more mysterious, I wonder why the network chose broadcast order?
That seems to usually be external influences, like "A Man Called
Shenandoah" meets Sally Kellerman this week so let's move "Six Months to
Mars"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Also, production order is clearly not intended airing order. Production
order, of course, is for convenience of when sets are made ready and
guest star availability and is meaningless for anything else.
Well, maybe. Production order should reflect the day they said "go"
which doesn't have anything to do with when it actually went into
production.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . if it even was production order. We don't know what studio records
they had. There's just no way that the psychic act episode was intended
to air last, but I don't have a better suggestion.
Tony Monk's Dr. No joke came a month earlier ...
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I should note that Frank Converse just turned 80 a few weeks ago (as did
the guy playing the Japanese student in this episode), so let me wish
him health and happiness.
Ditto

Joe Silver died almost 20 years ago but Brian
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Bedford only died two years ago.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2018-06-14 19:13:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
And I thank you for taking me on this journey. I hadn't ever realized
there were unseen episodes on the end of my DVD set!
This was fun.
Ditto
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.

There's no insert, so I have to pop in each disc to look at the menu
after seeing the criminal prosecution warning and the CBS vanity card,
which had nothing to do with production.

Disc One

1. A Time to be Born (pilot)
2. The Assassins (fake parents)
3. The Rebels (university)
4. A Dozen Demons (introduces Brother Anthony)

Disc Two

5. Faces (small town, may have known a young woman who was killed)
6. Man Running (Juliet Mills and Denholm Elliott)
7. A Charade for Murder (alleged comedy, enemy spies try to set him up
as a murder suspect)

Disc Three

8. Saturday (episode with the highest production values; Michael helps
the boy mourning his father take on some adult responsibilities)
9. The Presence of Evil (Joseph Wiseman doing a psychic act)
10. Six Months to Mars (human experimentation, Patrick O'Neal, Alan
Alda)

Disc Four

11. The Flip Side of Timmy Devon (Murray the K, Dick Clark, Sally
Kellerman)
12. Where You From and What You Done? (unaired)
13. Tomoyo (unaired)
Bonus: Larry Cohen interview (2017)

Production order and intended airdate are from the Wikipedia page, which
has various errors on it.

Production order:

1. A Time to be Born Writer: Albert Ruben Director: Paul Bogart
2. Where You From and What You Done? Writer: Edward DeBlasio
Director: Sam Wanamaker
3. A Dozen Demons Writer: Robert Crean Director: David Greene
4. Faces Writer: Alvin Sargent Director: Robert Stevens
5. Six Months to Mars Writer: Stanley R. Greenberg Director: David
Greene
6. The Assassins Writer: Albert Ruben Director: Lamont Johnson
7. Tomoyo Writer: Waldo Salt Director: David Greene
8. Man Running Writer: Art Wallace Director: Sam Wanamaker
9. A Charade for Murder Writer: Andy Lewis Director: David Pressman
10. The Flip Side of Timmy Devon Writer: Albert Ruben Director:
David Greene
11. The Rebels Writer: Robert Van Scoyk Director: Sam Wanamaker
12. Saturday Writer: Alvin Sargent Director: David Greene
13. The Presence of Evil Writer: Alvin Sargent Director: David
Greene

Note that Larry Cohen wrote none of the scripts.

Intended airdate:

Airdate Episode

May 29, 1967 A Time to Be Born
June 5, 1967 Where You From and What You Done? (Pre-empted)
June 12, 1967 The Assassins
June 19, 1967 The Rebels
June 26, 1967 Tomoyo (Pre-empted)
July 3, 1967 A Dozen Demons
July 10, 1967 Faces
July 17, 1967 Man Running
July 24, 1967 A Charade for Murder
July 31, 1967 Saturday
August 7, 1967 The Presence of Evil
August 14, 1967 Six Months to Mars
August 21, 1967 Where You From and What You Done? (Pre-empted
again)
August 28, 1967 Tomoyo (Pre-empted again)
September 4, 1967 The Flip Side of Timmy Devon
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Even more mysterious, I wonder why the network chose broadcast order?
That seems to usually be external influences, like "A Man Called
Shenandoah" meets Sally Kellerman this week so let's move "Six Months to
Mars"
Hehehehe
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Also, production order is clearly not intended airing order. Production
order, of course, is for convenience of when sets are made ready and
guest star availability and is meaningless for anything else.
Well, maybe. Production order should reflect the day they said "go"
which doesn't have anything to do with when it actually went into
production.
Got it.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . . if it even was production order. We don't know what studio records
they had. There's just no way that the psychic act episode was intended
to air last, but I don't have a better suggestion.
Tony Monk's Dr. No joke came a month earlier ...
It's not the same scriptwriter either, but the movie was fresh in mind.
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I should note that Frank Converse just turned 80 a few weeks ago (as did
the guy playing the Japanese student in this episode), so let me wish
him health and happiness.
Ditto
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Joe Silver died almost 20 years ago but Brian Bedford only died two
years ago.
anim8rfsk
2018-06-14 20:32:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
I have now completed the series, which failed to reveal the secret of
Coronet Blue.
And I thank you for taking me on this journey. I hadn't ever realized
there were unseen episodes on the end of my DVD set!
This was fun.
Ditto
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.
There's no insert, so I have to pop in each disc to look at the menu
after seeing the criminal prosecution warning and the CBS vanity card,
which had nothing to do with production.
Disc One
1. A Time to be Born (pilot)
2. The Assassins (fake parents)
3. The Rebels (university)
4. A Dozen Demons (introduces Brother Anthony)
Disc Two
5. Faces (small town, may have known a young woman who was killed)
6. Man Running (Juliet Mills and Denholm Elliott)
7. A Charade for Murder (alleged comedy, enemy spies try to set him up
as a murder suspect)
Disc Three
8. Saturday (episode with the highest production values; Michael helps
the boy mourning his father take on some adult responsibilities)
9. The Presence of Evil (Joseph Wiseman doing a psychic act)
10. Six Months to Mars (human experimentation, Patrick O'Neal, Alan
Alda)
Disc Four
11. The Flip Side of Timmy Devon (Murray the K, Dick Clark, Sally
Kellerman)
12. Where You From and What You Done? (unaired)
13. Tomoyo (unaired)
Bonus: Larry Cohen interview (2017)
Okay, so that's 'actually aired date' with 'unaired' at the end, in
order of 'scheduled to be aired date'
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2018-06-14 20:39:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.
. . .
Okay, so that's 'actually aired date' with 'unaired' at the end, in
order of 'scheduled to be aired date'
Oh. Duh. I just made the three lists, and I'm blind to the obvious.
anim8rfsk
2018-06-14 23:45:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.
. . .
Okay, so that's 'actually aired date' with 'unaired' at the end, in
order of 'scheduled to be aired date'
Oh. Duh. I just made the three lists, and I'm blind to the obvious.
That's because he's on vacation.

:)

Hey, anybody try emailing him, just to be sure?
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
anim8rfsk
2018-06-16 03:02:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.
. . .
Okay, so that's 'actually aired date' with 'unaired' at the end, in
order of 'scheduled to be aired date'
Oh. Duh. I just made the three lists, and I'm blind to the obvious.
That's because he's on vacation.
:)
Hey, anybody try emailing him, just to be sure?
Follow up - I did, I'll keep you a breast.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Adam H. Kerman
2018-06-16 05:42:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
Other than the pilot was the first episode of the first DVD, why did the
publisher choose this order? Sometimes it's understandable because of
limited disk space that they're trying to make things fit and avoiding
undesireable compression, but I don't see how that's the case here.
Isn't the DVD order "actually aired date with never aired at the end"?
I've just been following your lead.
As Ian is my witness, I'm making lists.
. . .
Okay, so that's 'actually aired date' with 'unaired' at the end, in
order of 'scheduled to be aired date'
Oh. Duh. I just made the three lists, and I'm blind to the obvious.
That's because he's on vacation.
:)
Hey, anybody try emailing him, just to be sure?
Follow up - I did, I'll keep you a breast.
Use the Chloe Dykstra breasts. They looked slightly cartoonish.

Loading...