Discussion:
The reality of masks. How effective are they?
(too old to reply)
RichA
2020-07-10 01:18:06 UTC
Permalink
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Cheap masks without the nose cinch don't secure properly and do not offer the same security as a medical mask. They aren't even fit for use when dealing with particulate matter like saw dust. Cloth masks fashioned like bandanas are just about the most ineffective things. Re-using masks is questionable. Once the moisture that adheres to the front (from someone else's breath) or the back (your breath) dries, it frees-up virus particles which can easily be breathed in, or blown out into the air. However, individual or clumped dried virus particles are not efficient vectors of the disease as they don't provide enough "viral load" to infect someone easily.
kensi
2020-07-10 02:18:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Once the moisture that adheres to the front (from someone else's breath)
or the back (your breath) dries, it frees-up virus particles which can
easily be breathed in, or blown out into the air.
Yes, but by then those virus particles are dead, having dried up. It
doesn't survive long on absorbent, cottony-type materials.
--
"To explain the unknown by the known is a logical procedure; to explain
the known by the unknown is a form of theological lunacy." ~David Brooks
"I get fooled all the time by the constant hosiery parade
in here." ~Checkmate
RichA
2020-07-10 07:16:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by kensi
Post by RichA
Once the moisture that adheres to the front (from someone else's breath)
or the back (your breath) dries, it frees-up virus particles which can
easily be breathed in, or blown out into the air.
Yes, but by then those virus particles are dead, having dried up. It
doesn't survive long on absorbent, cottony-type materials.
They can last for some time, depending on the conditions. Moist conditions, on an artificial surface, 3 days?
kensi
2020-07-11 03:19:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Post by kensi
Post by RichA
Once the moisture that adheres to the front (from someone else's breath)
or the back (your breath) dries, it frees-up virus particles which can
easily be breathed in, or blown out into the air.
Yes, but by then those virus particles are dead, having dried up. It
doesn't survive long on absorbent, cottony-type materials.
They can last for some time, depending on the conditions. Moist
Irrelevant since the scenario under discussion is specifically "once the
moisture dries", as is plain from the quotation above.

Nice try at goalpost-moving, though, kOoky.
--
"To explain the unknown by the known is a logical procedure; to explain
the known by the unknown is a form of theological lunacy." ~David Brooks
"I get fooled all the time by the constant hosiery parade
in here." ~Checkmate
RichA
2020-07-11 06:31:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by kensi
Post by RichA
Post by kensi
Post by RichA
Once the moisture that adheres to the front (from someone else's breath)
or the back (your breath) dries, it frees-up virus particles which can
easily be breathed in, or blown out into the air.
Yes, but by then those virus particles are dead, having dried up. It
doesn't survive long on absorbent, cottony-type materials.
They can last for some time, depending on the conditions. Moist
Irrelevant since the scenario under discussion is specifically "once the
moisture dries", as is plain from the quotation above.
Nice try at goalpost-moving, though, kOoky.
Drying doesn't kill the virus, dimwit.
~Checkmate
kensi
2020-07-11 09:54:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Post by kensi
Irrelevant since the scenario under discussion is specifically "once the
moisture dries", as is plain from the quotation above.
Nice try at goalpost-moving, though, kOoky.
Drying doesn't kill the virus
Of course it does, kO0k.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/brucelee/2020/05/01/how-long-does-covid-19-coronavirus-survive-on-clothes-how-to-wash-them/

"So which of the items is most like your clothes? Well, as suggested by
an article in New York Times by Tara Parker-Pope who talked to an
aerosol scientist and a pediatric infectious disease specialist, it
could be cardboard because both can consist of fibers that absorb
moisture. The virus needs some moisture to survive. Without it, the
virus can quickly dry up and no longer be viable."

SPNAK!!

Do you *ever* get tired of being proved wrong in public, dimwit?
--
"To explain the unknown by the known is a logical procedure; to explain
the known by the unknown is a form of theological lunacy." ~David Brooks
"I get fooled all the time by the constant hosiery parade
in here." ~Checkmate
Your Name
2020-07-10 03:40:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the
best for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose
cinch. Cheap masks without the nose cinch don't secure properly and do
not offer the same security as a medical mask. They aren't even fit
for use when dealing with particulate matter like saw dust. Cloth masks
fashioned like bandanas are just about the most ineffective things.
Re-using masks is questionable. Once the moisture that adheres to the
front (from someone else's breath) or the back (your breath) dries, it
frees-up virus particles which can easily be breathed in, or blown out
into the air. However, individual or clumped dried virus particles are
not efficient vectors of the disease as they don't provide enough
"viral load" to infect someone easily.
The Joy of Tech's Field Guide to Maskholes*
<Loading Image...>

;-)


* Note: It's not about the holes in masks.
Ubiquitous
2020-07-15 18:24:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.

--
"It took a worldwide pandemic. It took a 35% plunge in the stock
market. It took quarantining. It took many small businesses closing. It
took canceling practically everything, to bring the USA economy back to
the Obama high mark."
anim8rfsk
2020-07-15 20:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
You troll o meter yourself, right now!
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Ubiquitous
2020-07-15 22:18:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
You troll o meter yourself, right now!


--
"It took a worldwide pandemic. It took a 35% plunge in the stock
market. It took quarantining. It took many small businesses closing. It
took canceling practically everything, to bring the USA economy back to
the Obama high mark."
anim8rfsk
2020-07-16 01:00:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
You troll o meter yourself, right now!
http://youtu.be/A0UclAmrhVI
It launches a 'goofy Arizona candidate' ad. I don't know what the Hell party
they're in, but I'm voting against them.
And for God's sake, do second takes.

Ack, it's a talking ballot in *another* ad!

Okay, so here's this lying asshole Nye.

You owe yourself TWO troll o meters.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
Ubiquitous
2020-07-16 19:31:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
You troll o meter yourself, right now!
http://youtu.be/A0UclAmrhVI
It launches a 'goofy Arizona candidate' ad. I don't know what the Hell party
they're in, but I'm voting against them.
And for God's sake, do second takes.
Ack, it's a talking ballot in *another* ad!
Okay, so here's this lying asshole Nye.
You owe yourself TWO troll o meters.
Why? You just saw that he did it.

--
"It took a worldwide pandemic. It took a 35% plunge in the stock
market. It took quarantining. It took many small businesses closing. It
took canceling practically everything, to bring the USA economy back to
the Obama high mark."
anim8rfsk
2020-07-16 20:07:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by anim8rfsk
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
You troll o meter yourself, right now!
http://youtu.be/A0UclAmrhVI
It launches a 'goofy Arizona candidate' ad. I don't know what the Hell party
they're in, but I'm voting against them.
And for God's sake, do second takes.
Ack, it's a talking ballot in *another* ad!
Okay, so here's this lying asshole Nye.
You owe yourself TWO troll o meters.
Why? You just saw that he did it.
I never said the lying sack of crap didn't.
--
Join your old RAT friends at
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1688985234647266/
shawn
2020-07-15 20:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
trotsky
2020-07-16 10:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
Bullshit. Most masks don't filter the particle size necessary on the
way into your body, but they do prevent most of the expulsion out of
your body, thus protecting others in your proximity. Why the fuck can't
Americans learn the facts? Are we really this stupid?
moviePig
2020-07-16 13:59:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate.  N95 are the
best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
Bullshit.  Most masks don't filter the particle size necessary on the
way into your body, but they do prevent most of the expulsion out of
your body, thus protecting others in your proximity.  Why the fuck can't
Americans learn the facts?  Are we really this stupid?
Either you didn't read shawn's post, or I didn't...
shawn
2020-07-16 15:29:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by moviePig
Post by shawn
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate.  N95 are the
best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
Bullshit.  Most masks don't filter the particle size necessary on the
way into your body, but they do prevent most of the expulsion out of
your body, thus protecting others in your proximity.  Why the fuck can't
Americans learn the facts?  Are we really this stupid?
Either you didn't read shawn's post, or I didn't...
I think he's confused what I was referring to, the exhalation of
particles versus the inhalation of particles. No one is saying that
cloth masks are going to prevent you from getting Covid-19 but that
wearing even a simple cloth mask will cut down on the particulates
that you exhale. That's what the doctor's simple experiment helped to
show as the petri dishes where he was wearing a mask while
breathing/talking/shouting showed much less bacterial growth than
those dishes where he was not wearing a mask.
Pete
2020-07-16 19:31:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]

You can't win...

-- Pete --
moviePig
2020-07-16 19:47:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
Sounds like you can explode, though...
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-16 20:49:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
shawn
2020-07-16 21:31:46 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jul 2020 20:49:49 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
Presumably the valve is the easier exit when open but you can still
exhale through the mask material (cloth or whatever) if the valve is
closed.
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-16 21:37:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
Presumably the valve is the easier exit when open but you can still
exhale through the mask material (cloth or whatever) if the valve is
closed.
Can you? Wouldn't that allow too little air through? I've never worn an
N95 mask but it doesn't sound like one breaths through it normally.
Pete
2020-07-17 05:34:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by shawn
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
Presumably the valve is the easier exit when open but you can still
exhale through the mask material (cloth or whatever) if the valve is
closed.
Can you? Wouldn't that allow too little air through? I've never worn an
N95 mask but it doesn't sound like one breaths through it normally.
As you normally inhale with the valve closed, I'd think that exhaling
would be not that hard either. Just a bit stuffier. If it really came
to it, I guess the excess pressure would push the air out the sides
of the mask. Kind of defeats its purpose though.

Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask protects the
wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps prognosis considerably.

-- Pete --
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-17 06:23:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by shawn
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
Presumably the valve is the easier exit when open but you can still
exhale through the mask material (cloth or whatever) if the valve is
closed.
Can you? Wouldn't that allow too little air through? I've never worn an
N95 mask but it doesn't sound like one breaths through it normally.
As you normally inhale with the valve closed, I'd think that exhaling
would be not that hard either. Just a bit stuffier. If it really came
to it, I guess the excess pressure would push the air out the sides
of the mask. Kind of defeats its purpose though.
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask protects the
wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps prognosis considerably.
Great. We'll see if I get a cold. I hope the staph or fungal infection
will be worth it.
Micky DuPree
2020-07-26 14:58:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"

<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>

Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.

-Micky
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-26 18:24:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.

Frequent hand washing with soap and water is far more effective than the
mask, but people just won't do it.

I keep getting yelled at to enforce the mask-wearing mandate because I
have to keep adjusting the mask to de-fog my glasses. I'm standing no
where near anyone else, so they yell at me across the room.

Have I failed to cut my risk by 65% here? Am I taking a chance that I'm
infecting a crowd of invisible people?
David Johnston
2020-07-26 19:23:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not. That being said, my library
requires people to use the bottle of hand sanitizer at the entrance on
entrance.
suzeeq
2020-07-26 19:27:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not. That being said, my library
requires people to use the bottle of hand sanitizer at the entrance on
entrance.
There's one at the entrance to my library too though it's voluntary. But
there's also some near the tablets and computers which is when I will
use it.
Micky DuPree
2020-08-05 18:28:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by suzeeq
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking
their fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which
protects you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not. That being said, my
library requires people to use the bottle of hand sanitizer at the
entrance on entrance.
There's one at the entrance to my library too though it's voluntary.
But there's also some near the tablets and computers which is when I
will use it.
As I suspected, fomite transmission (i.e., infection from touching
surfaces) isn't that common. It's still good to wash your hands,
because the risk isn't zero, but the primary mode of virus transmission
is via shared air.

<https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473-3099(20)30561-2.pdf>

"Exaggerated risk of transmission of COVID-19 by fomite"

In my household, we merely quarantine objects introduced into the
household for three days before touching them barehanded if we can, and
that's probably two days more than we need to.

The decontamination theater that some schools and businesses seem to be
prepared to do to reassure the public via Lysoling all the surfaces is
of dubious value to my educated layman's eyes. Doing something about
indoor ventilation is far more important if people are going to be
sharing indoor space for more than a half-hour (with masks) or five
minutes (without masks).

-Micky
Adam H. Kerman
2020-08-05 18:49:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by suzeeq
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
<https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/>
Post by suzeeq
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking
their fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which
protects you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not. That being said, my
library requires people to use the bottle of hand sanitizer at the
entrance on entrance.
There's one at the entrance to my library too though it's voluntary.
But there's also some near the tablets and computers which is when I
will use it.
As I suspected, fomite transmission (i.e., infection from touching
surfaces) isn't that common. . . .
Not what I'm talking about. The common cold, from what I've read, is
transmitted thusly: Sneeze, lingers in the air, someone else's hand,
hand to face to mucous membrane like the surface of the eye

I'm guessing that's likely happening with COVID but no one's said that.

I agree with you about surfaces.

Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-26 19:37:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Post by David Johnston
That being said, my library requires people to use the bottle of hand
sanitizer at the entrance on entrance.
Soap and water is effective against COVID-19, the hand sanitizer isn't.
shawn
2020-07-26 21:24:54 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 26 Jul 2020 19:37:17 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Post by David Johnston
That being said, my library requires people to use the bottle of hand
sanitizer at the entrance on entrance.
Soap and water is effective against COVID-19, the hand sanitizer isn't.
Apparently neither is soap and water according to a study I read. Not
to say that using soap and water isn't the right thing to. Just that
it won't kill the virus in the time you spend washing your hands. What
does happen is the surfactants work to free the virus from your skin
so it gets washed away and thus keeps you safe (or at least safer). So
keep washing your hands and use plenty of soap.

Here's one mention :
https://news.northeastern.edu/2020/03/20/heres-why-washing-your-hands-with-soap-for-20-seconds-protects-you-from-covid-19/
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-26 21:36:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
On Sun, 26 Jul 2020 19:37:17 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Post by David Johnston
That being said, my library requires people to use the bottle of hand
sanitizer at the entrance on entrance.
Soap and water is effective against COVID-19, the hand sanitizer isn't.
Apparently neither is soap and water according to a study I read. Not
to say that using soap and water isn't the right thing to. Just that
it won't kill the virus in the time you spend washing your hands. What
does happen is the surfactants work to free the virus from your skin
so it gets washed away and thus keeps you safe (or at least safer). So
keep washing your hands and use plenty of soap.
Works for me. I really objectd to getting the virus drunk with the
alchohol in the hand sanitizer. I mean, if the virus knew I was going to
keep buying it drinks, it just wasn't going to leave.
Post by shawn
https://news.northeastern.edu/2020/03/20/heres-why-washing-your-hands-with-soap-for-20-seconds-protects-you-from-covid-19/
David Johnston
2020-07-27 03:24:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Incidentaly if you are careful to press your mask to your nose and put
your glasses on top they won't fog up.
suzeeq
2020-07-27 05:02:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Micky DuPree
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well. Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
"Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19. This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible. Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Incidentaly if you are careful to press your mask to your nose and put
your glasses on top they won't fog up.
Nope, that doesn't work well either. They still fog.
FPP
2020-07-27 05:44:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by suzeeq
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well.  Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
     "Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19.  This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible.  Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Incidentaly if you are careful to press your mask to your nose and put
your glasses on top they won't fog up.
Nope, that doesn't work well either. They still fog.
I used a de-fogging solution. It's a tad expensive...
--
History will show when Tyranny came to the streets of America, the 3%,
Militiamen and Gun Nuts, who like to dress up as GI Joe in tactical
gear, were nowhere to be seen.
But a bunch of Moms dressed in yellow, wearing bicycle helmets, stood
tall. - Rob Chappell

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
trotsky
2020-07-27 11:28:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by suzeeq
Post by David Johnston
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Just saw on the news, though, that a UCSF study shows any mask
protects the wearer as well.  Any reduction in exposure helps
prognosis considerably.
     "Your Mask Cuts Own Risk by 65 Percent"
https://www.ucdavis.edu/coronavirus/news/your-mask-cuts-own-risk-65-percent/
Every country that has an enforced national mask mandate has done
radically better at lowering both case rate and death rate from
Covid-19.  This is not controversial except to people sticking their
fingers in their ears and humming.
And yet no one mandates hand washing with soap and water, which protects
you directly. I wonder why that is.
Masks are visible.  Washed hands are not.
The pandemic has turned a whole lot of people into 12 year old school
girl elementary school hall monitors. I'm sure all of my mask violations
have gone onto my permanent record.
Incidentaly if you are careful to press your mask to your nose and
put your glasses on top they won't fog up.
Nope, that doesn't work well either. They still fog.
I used a de-fogging solution.  It's a tad expensive...
Can that be used on Thanny's brain?
FPP
2020-07-17 02:51:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
On Thu, 16 Jul 2020 20:49:49 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Pete
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch.
Jumping in here, I was intrigued to see a notice outside Trader Joe's
that "The exit valve of N95 masks does not block exhaled particles,
and must be sealed before entering the store" [approximate wording]
You can't win...
I don't get it. If the valve is sealed, how does one exhale?
Presumably the valve is the easier exit when open but you can still
exhale through the mask material (cloth or whatever) if the valve is
closed.
Yup... one way (exhale) valve. Air goes out, not in.
Great for keeping the mask from fogging up your glasses - but nothing is
100%.

Loading Image...

I use the Moldex, mostly because that's what they gave us in work...
--
Nuts that spent the last twenty years prepping their bunker to survive
indefinitely in a nuclear winter are giving up after wearing a thin
cloth mask for three weeks. LOL -Matt Haughey

"Leaders who have hidden in a bunker and gassed their own citizens
include Saddam Hussein, Adolf Hitler and Donald [Bunker Bitch] Trump." -
Ben Wexler
REAL PRESIDENTS LEAD. REALITY TV PRESIDENTS DON'T.

Trump: "No, I don't take responsibility at all." - 3/13/20
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-16 15:57:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by shawn
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
That's what I had kind of figured months ago. The mask wearer is relying
on the mask to absorb moisture in one's breath. It's... an argument that
wearing masks for any length of time isn't good for one's health. You're
breathing back in excessive bacterial growth, the mask itself now that
it remains damp provides a growth medium for bacteria.

His demonstration would have been a lot more useful trying to grow COVID
and not bacteria.
suzeeq
2020-07-16 17:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by shawn
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by RichA
Masks do help prevent direct expulsion and inhalation of particles of
moisture too large to pass through the mask substrate. N95 are the best
for this, followed by medical grade masks with the wire nose cinch. Chea
I couldn't help notice Bill Nye made some YouTube(?) video about this
recently.
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
That's what I had kind of figured months ago. The mask wearer is relying
on the mask to absorb moisture in one's breath. It's... an argument that
wearing masks for any length of time isn't good for one's health. You're
breathing back in excessive bacterial growth, the mask itself now that
it remains damp provides a growth medium for bacteria.
That's why you have reusable one that you can wash.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
His demonstration would have been a lot more useful trying to grow COVID
and not bacteria.
Adam H. Kerman
2020-07-16 18:28:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by shawn
. . .
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
That's what I had kind of figured months ago. The mask wearer is relying
on the mask to absorb moisture in one's breath. It's... an argument that
wearing masks for any length of time isn't good for one's health. You're
breathing back in excessive bacterial growth, the mask itself now that
it remains damp provides a growth medium for bacteria.
That's why you have reusable one that you can wash.
How do I wash the mask I'm wearing? Once the mask has dried because I'm
no longer using it, there's not a great deal of danger from the bacteria
as we're not talking about spores.

You're missing the point: The surgical team wears surgical masks for a
very specific reason that they are operating within a surgical cavity or
the patient already had open wounds.

The rest of us aren't supposed to be wearing masks as part of every day
living. And you've really got to wonder about cold-and-flu season,
whether those wearing masks have increased the likelihood that they'll
get a cold or flu infection.

Yes, I get the benefit of shortening the distance that one will be
expelling virus from one's own mouth and nose, but every other aspect of
mask wearing has a negative benefit for the person wearing the mask.
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
His demonstration would have been a lot more useful trying to grow COVID
and not bacteria.
The point would be that no one has bothered to do a proper
epidemiological study of benefit and risk to the mask wearer and benefit
and risk to people he's interacting with. It's all hand waiving.

Chinese and Japanese (maybe Koreans too) have had a social practice of
wearing surgical masks during cold and flu season FOR YEARS, regardless
of whether they have flu-like sympoms. We should have the answer for
certain at this point, yes?
suzeeq
2020-07-16 18:57:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by shawn
. . .
There was a great little picture posted on Twitter by a doctor that
showed a bunch of petri dishes with bacterial growth from when he was
talking at various distances with and without a mask. It clearly
showed how a mask does significantly cut down on the amount of
bacteria that escapes with every breath you take.
That's what I had kind of figured months ago. The mask wearer is relying
on the mask to absorb moisture in one's breath. It's... an argument that
wearing masks for any length of time isn't good for one's health. You're
breathing back in excessive bacterial growth, the mask itself now that
it remains damp provides a growth medium for bacteria.
That's why you have reusable one that you can wash.
How do I wash the mask I'm wearing? Once the mask has dried because I'm
no longer using it, there's not a great deal of danger from the bacteria
as we're not talking about spores.
You have a couplethree of them and rotate, every day but not every wearing.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're missing the point: The surgical team wears surgical masks for a
very specific reason that they are operating within a surgical cavity or
the patient already had open wounds.
The rest of us aren't supposed to be wearing masks as part of every day
living. And you've really got to wonder about cold-and-flu season,
whether those wearing masks have increased the likelihood that they'll
get a cold or flu infection.
They've been doing it for years in Asian countries, so where is the data
on mask wearing people getting infected?
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