Discussion:
Endeavour "Deguello"
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Adam H. Kerman
2019-07-08 17:07:43 UTC
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Permalink
Our friend tomcervo pointed out that this was cut from the first
episode and sets up a bit of the plot for one scene.


Tons of revelations in this episode, with various dangling plot points
wrapped up from the previous season that no viewer remembers much
about from a long year ago, and no one liked enough to re-watch episods.

At college, the chief librarian of (I forget the name of the library) is
murdered. He was part of a group of ramblers, walkers who went on great
treks through the beautiful countryside, nearly none of which we saw.

Immediate suspects are two professors using the library, including one
who enjoyed reading erotic prose from the Edwardian era that was in a
special collection not generally accessible. He said he was writing a
paper but it wasn't his field.

Morse completely violated his privacy by obtaining records of everything
he borrowed. I really have no idea what Morse was thinking unless he
wanted to read the literature himself.

There was also a wealthy family that donated a stamp collection to the
same library. This library's collections are certainly eclectic. The
other professor was going through those. The family's name was
Teagarden, but it's supposed to be Baumgarten. They were Jewish and only
a handful escaped Germany before the rest perished in a bombed WWII
labor camp, including a well-known physicist.

Turns out that the second professor was harassing the first professor,
who had promised to use his influence with a counselate to get them out
of Germany. The first professor was an admirer of the physicist. This
part of the story made no sense, that anyone could believe that the
first professor had any kind of contact to set up an immigration or
refugee visa. The second professor was in love with the physicist's
daughter and blamed the first professor for failing to help them. The
first professor had notebooks from the famous physicist but they
demonstrated advanced senility and he destroyed them to hide his
condition and not call into question his earlier work.

That's certainly fortunate, because what would have been the
implications of a Jewish prisoner of the state inadvertently
contributing to the German war effort if he hadn't been senile at this
time?

These two professors had nothing to do with the murders.

Meanwhile, a brand-new council housing high rise building collapsed. It's
daytime, limiting the deaths and injuries to women and children. If it
had been overnight, far more people could have been killed.

I tried a quick Goog to see what ripped-from-the-headlines news story
this was based on but didn't spot anything. Do any of our friends from
the UK recall this?

It's a reinforced concrete structure. Morse would figure out that the
corrupt building contractor substituted aggregate in the concrete
mixture made from sand mined from the ocean and not aggregate from a
nearby quarry that the Council was charged for, and pocketed the
difference. Salt in the mixture caused immediate corrosion in the rebar.
As far as I know, the structural ill effects would take place slowly
over time and wouldn't lead to immediate catastrophic failure within a
few months of completion.

This was discovered by the Council building inspector a year earlier, a
fellow rambler friend of the librarian's. He was shot in the back and
his corpse hidden in the Council housing project, exposed with the
building's collapse.

Morse then concludes, with no evidence, that the librarian had been
killed as he was looking into the disappearance of his friend.

There's a corrupt politician covering everything up. We already knew
about the Acting Chief Constable's corruption, I guess, probably from
dialogue last season. He's been mainly an off-screen character. Bright,
still in Traffic, is called into a metting with the politician and the
ACC and told to end Morse's investigation. Bright points out that Morse
isn't in his chain of command and also flat out tells the politician
that he won't be his friend. This leads to the attempt of Bright's life
and the amusing way in which the attempt is thwarted.

Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him. A
very weak Thursday succumbed to Box's entreties and accepted a payoff.
His wife immediately knows what's up and tells him that she won't take
the money. In this episode, Jago hands Thursday a second payoff RIGHT IN
THE POLICE STATION, which is absurd. In another conversation with his
wife, after not speaking her mind for a year, Win finally tells him that
she doesn't care that they don't have money, that they've been poor
before but survived, and that she wants the man she married back. She's
seen a solicitor to initiate divorce. They have a huge fight but both
characters are a bit laconic and neither raises a voice. Neither one
wants to keep the house as both children are adults.

Thursday writes his wife a long letter but we aren't shown its contents.
He screws up his courage and returns both payoffs to Jago.

There's a big Wild West confrontation at the quarry/mining operation.
The construction contractor is there, one of the principles in the
conspiracy, also a Mason who also tried to influence Strange to block
the investigations. This was actually to be the place that Morse was
executed, but all four men show up.

Because the war is fought with exposition rather than shooting and Jago
is present but not Box, Morse immediately figures out that it was Jago
who took over the rackets from the local mobster (was he killed or did
he simply disappear?), including all the heroin laced with quinine
deaths that Strange has been investigating. DeBryn the pathologist was
also kidnapped. Box is corrupt and has covered up murders but he has no
stomach to cover up the murders of multiple police officers to keep the
conspiracy going. Jago admits that all the deaths with a gun
Box took off some criminal, including Fancy's, were actually Jago's
because Jago is the expositioning villain.

Jago claims he can write a convincing report blaming all the corruption
on the four men and that they shot each other dead for REASONS. Could
this possibly be foreshadowing?

Bright makes the bold pronouncemet: Jago may have influence over patrol
and C.I.D., but he has no influence over Traffic! At that moment, I was
expecting Bright's men to swoop in as a motorcycle calvary, which might
have been fun, but that doesn't happen. Instead, the villains run for
high ground and it's a race to see who can get the drop on whom.

So we can resolve the scene, Thursday pursues Jago but Jago gets the
drop on him in a movie-style confrontation in which Jago sticks the gun
in Thursday's face. In the real world, you don't do that because that
has put the gun within reach of the guy you're trying to kill. Somehow, Morse
and Box get there. Morse knows enough to point his gun at Jago from a
distance away.

Remember the foreshadowing? Box stops Jago, shooting him dead with one
shot but not before Jago got off a shot, traumatically injuring Box. He
hasn't died by the end of the episode.

Back at the station, Bright explains the report that he's going to
write, closing the books on the corruption and avenging Fancy's death,
again, something no viewer remembers the details of from a year earlier.
Thusday gets a field promotion from Bright, so he's still not as high as
he was last season. Hadn't he been demoted two steps? Strange will
return to Thames Valley as Bright's right-hand man.

Morse gets Bright's gratitude but no promotion.

Thursday returns home. His wife is lit so she glows and we know that
Thursday is once again a man in her eyes.

Bright returns to his wife. At first I thought she'd died but looking
again, she's either sleeping or passed out on a couch as I can see
shallow breathing.

We see Morse purchase a house that he got cheap 'cuz dead junkies were
found in it at the episode's beginning. Also, the police motor pool have
repaired the Jag. All those years of Inspector Morse, I thought Morse
was driving his personal Jag (remember, Lewis never drove him) and not a
company car.

The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
suzeeq
2019-07-08 17:29:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Our friend tomcervo pointed out that this was cut from the first
episode and sets up a bit of the plot for one scene.
http://youtu.be/jUNi0BN9oAM
Tons of revelations in this episode, with various dangling plot points
wrapped up from the previous season that no viewer remembers much
about from a long year ago, and no one liked enough to re-watch episods.
At college, the chief librarian of (I forget the name of the library) is
Bodleian.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
murdered. He was part of a group of ramblers, walkers who went on great
treks through the beautiful countryside, nearly none of which we saw.
Immediate suspects are two professors using the library, including one
who enjoyed reading erotic prose from the Edwardian era that was in a
special collection not generally accessible. He said he was writing a
paper but it wasn't his field.
Morse completely violated his privacy by obtaining records of everything
he borrowed. I really have no idea what Morse was thinking unless he
wanted to read the literature himself.
There was also a wealthy family that donated a stamp collection to the
same library. This library's collections are certainly eclectic. The
other professor was going through those. The family's name was
Teagarden, but it's supposed to be Baumgarten. They were Jewish and only
a handful escaped Germany before the rest perished in a bombed WWII
labor camp, including a well-known physicist.
Treegarden, not Teagarden. Baum is german for 'tree'.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Turns out that the second professor was harassing the first professor,
who had promised to use his influence with a counselate to get them out
of Germany. The first professor was an admirer of the physicist. This
part of the story made no sense, that anyone could believe that the
first professor had any kind of contact to set up an immigration or
refugee visa. The second professor was in love with the physicist's
daughter and blamed the first professor for failing to help them. The
first professor had notebooks from the famous physicist but they
demonstrated advanced senility and he destroyed them to hide his
condition and not call into question his earlier work.
That's certainly fortunate, because what would have been the
implications of a Jewish prisoner of the state inadvertently
contributing to the German war effort if he hadn't been senile at this
time?
These two professors had nothing to do with the murders.
Meanwhile, a brand-new council housing high rise building collapsed. It's
daytime, limiting the deaths and injuries to women and children. If it
had been overnight, far more people could have been killed.
I tried a quick Goog to see what ripped-from-the-headlines news story
this was based on but didn't spot anything. Do any of our friends from
the UK recall this?
It's a reinforced concrete structure. Morse would figure out that the
corrupt building contractor substituted aggregate in the concrete
mixture made from sand mined from the ocean and not aggregate from a
nearby quarry that the Council was charged for, and pocketed the
difference. Salt in the mixture caused immediate corrosion in the rebar.
As far as I know, the structural ill effects would take place slowly
over time and wouldn't lead to immediate catastrophic failure within a
few months of completion.
This was discovered by the Council building inspector a year earlier, a
fellow rambler friend of the librarian's. He was shot in the back and
his corpse hidden in the Council housing project, exposed with the
building's collapse.
Morse then concludes, with no evidence, that the librarian had been
killed as he was looking into the disappearance of his friend.
There's a corrupt politician covering everything up. We already knew
about the Acting Chief Constable's corruption, I guess, probably from
dialogue last season. He's been mainly an off-screen character. Bright,
still in Traffic, is called into a metting with the politician and the
ACC and told to end Morse's investigation. Bright points out that Morse
isn't in his chain of command and also flat out tells the politician
that he won't be his friend. This leads to the attempt of Bright's life
and the amusing way in which the attempt is thwarted.
Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him. A
I think it was his brother in law, or a close friend who persuaded him
to invest their entire life savings with him. Which he either lost, or
fled the country with.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
very weak Thursday succumbed to Box's entreties and accepted a payoff.
His wife immediately knows what's up and tells him that she won't take
the money. In this episode, Jago hands Thursday a second payoff RIGHT IN
THE POLICE STATION, which is absurd. In another conversation with his
wife, after not speaking her mind for a year, Win finally tells him that
she doesn't care that they don't have money, that they've been poor
before but survived, and that she wants the man she married back. She's
seen a solicitor to initiate divorce. They have a huge fight but both
characters are a bit laconic and neither raises a voice. Neither one
wants to keep the house as both children are adults.
Thursday writes his wife a long letter but we aren't shown its contents.
He screws up his courage and returns both payoffs to Jago.
There's a big Wild West confrontation at the quarry/mining operation.
The construction contractor is there, one of the principles in the
conspiracy, also a Mason who also tried to influence Strange to block
the investigations. This was actually to be the place that Morse was
executed, but all four men show up.
Because the war is fought with exposition rather than shooting and Jago
is present but not Box, Morse immediately figures out that it was Jago
who took over the rackets from the local mobster (was he killed or did
he simply disappear?), including all the heroin laced with quinine
deaths that Strange has been investigating. DeBryn the pathologist was
also kidnapped. Box is corrupt and has covered up murders but he has no
stomach to cover up the murders of multiple police officers to keep the
conspiracy going. Jago admits that all the deaths with a gun
Box took off some criminal, including Fancy's, were actually Jago's
because Jago is the expositioning villain.
Jago claims he can write a convincing report blaming all the corruption
on the four men and that they shot each other dead for REASONS. Could
this possibly be foreshadowing?
Bright makes the bold pronouncemet: Jago may have influence over patrol
and C.I.D., but he has no influence over Traffic! At that moment, I was
expecting Bright's men to swoop in as a motorcycle calvary, which might
have been fun, but that doesn't happen. Instead, the villains run for
high ground and it's a race to see who can get the drop on whom.
So we can resolve the scene, Thursday pursues Jago but Jago gets the
drop on him in a movie-style confrontation in which Jago sticks the gun
in Thursday's face. In the real world, you don't do that because that
has put the gun within reach of the guy you're trying to kill. Somehow, Morse
and Box get there. Morse knows enough to point his gun at Jago from a
distance away.
Remember the foreshadowing? Box stops Jago, shooting him dead with one
shot but not before Jago got off a shot, traumatically injuring Box. He
hasn't died by the end of the episode.
Back at the station, Bright explains the report that he's going to
write, closing the books on the corruption and avenging Fancy's death,
again, something no viewer remembers the details of from a year earlier.
Thusday gets a field promotion from Bright, so he's still not as high as
he was last season. Hadn't he been demoted two steps? Strange will
return to Thames Valley as Bright's right-hand man.
Morse gets Bright's gratitude but no promotion.
He's Thursday's right hand man though.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Thursday returns home. His wife is lit so she glows and we know that
Thursday is once again a man in her eyes.
Bright returns to his wife. At first I thought she'd died but looking
again, she's either sleeping or passed out on a couch as I can see
shallow breathing.
We see Morse purchase a house that he got cheap 'cuz dead junkies were
found in it at the episode's beginning. Also, the police motor pool have
repaired the Jag. All those years of Inspector Morse, I thought Morse
was driving his personal Jag (remember, Lewis never drove him) and not a
company car.
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-07-08 17:46:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Our friend tomcervo pointed out that this was cut from the first
episode and sets up a bit of the plot for one scene.
http://youtu.be/jUNi0BN9oAM
Tons of revelations in this episode, with various dangling plot points
wrapped up from the previous season that no viewer remembers much
about from a long year ago, and no one liked enough to re-watch episods.
At college, the chief librarian of (I forget the name of the library) is
Bodleian.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
murdered. He was part of a group of ramblers, walkers who went on great
treks through the beautiful countryside, nearly none of which we saw.
Immediate suspects are two professors using the library, including one
who enjoyed reading erotic prose from the Edwardian era that was in a
special collection not generally accessible. He said he was writing a
paper but it wasn't his field.
Morse completely violated his privacy by obtaining records of everything
he borrowed. I really have no idea what Morse was thinking unless he
wanted to read the literature himself.
There was also a wealthy family that donated a stamp collection to the
same library. This library's collections are certainly eclectic. The
other professor was going through those. The family's name was
Teagarden, but it's supposed to be Baumgarten. They were Jewish and only
a handful escaped Germany before the rest perished in a bombed WWII
labor camp, including a well-known physicist.
Treegarden, not Teagarden. Baum is german for 'tree'.
I recall a closeup of "Teagarden" at some point. Also, the character
played by Laura Donoughue (in the UK, there are not enough Jewish actors
to play Jews) was listed as Deborah Teagarden in closing credits. She
wasn't saying that the immigration official translated from the German,
just got it wrong.

I know how she feels. My uncommon last name is said to be something
written down in error by immigration and the family name from Poland or
Russia was forgotten.
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Turns out that the second professor was harassing the first professor,
who had promised to use his influence with a counselate to get them out
of Germany. The first professor was an admirer of the physicist. This
part of the story made no sense, that anyone could believe that the
first professor had any kind of contact to set up an immigration or
refugee visa. The second professor was in love with the physicist's
daughter and blamed the first professor for failing to help them. The
first professor had notebooks from the famous physicist but they
demonstrated advanced senility and he destroyed them to hide his
condition and not call into question his earlier work.
That's certainly fortunate, because what would have been the
implications of a Jewish prisoner of the state inadvertently
contributing to the German war effort if he hadn't been senile at this
time?
These two professors had nothing to do with the murders.
Meanwhile, a brand-new council housing high rise building collapsed. It's
daytime, limiting the deaths and injuries to women and children. If it
had been overnight, far more people could have been killed.
I tried a quick Goog to see what ripped-from-the-headlines news story
this was based on but didn't spot anything. Do any of our friends from
the UK recall this?
It's a reinforced concrete structure. Morse would figure out that the
corrupt building contractor substituted aggregate in the concrete
mixture made from sand mined from the ocean and not aggregate from a
nearby quarry that the Council was charged for, and pocketed the
difference. Salt in the mixture caused immediate corrosion in the rebar.
As far as I know, the structural ill effects would take place slowly
over time and wouldn't lead to immediate catastrophic failure within a
few months of completion.
This was discovered by the Council building inspector a year earlier, a
fellow rambler friend of the librarian's. He was shot in the back and
his corpse hidden in the Council housing project, exposed with the
building's collapse.
Morse then concludes, with no evidence, that the librarian had been
killed as he was looking into the disappearance of his friend.
There's a corrupt politician covering everything up. We already knew
about the Acting Chief Constable's corruption, I guess, probably from
dialogue last season. He's been mainly an off-screen character. Bright,
still in Traffic, is called into a metting with the politician and the
ACC and told to end Morse's investigation. Bright points out that Morse
isn't in his chain of command and also flat out tells the politician
that he won't be his friend. This leads to the attempt of Bright's life
and the amusing way in which the attempt is thwarted.
Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him. A
I think it was his brother in law, or a close friend who persuaded him
to invest their entire life savings with him. Which he either lost, or
fled the country with.
It was nothing to do with the ongoing corruption? Ok.
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
very weak Thursday succumbed to Box's entreties and accepted a payoff.
His wife immediately knows what's up and tells him that she won't take
the money. In this episode, Jago hands Thursday a second payoff RIGHT IN
THE POLICE STATION, which is absurd. In another conversation with his
wife, after not speaking her mind for a year, Win finally tells him that
she doesn't care that they don't have money, that they've been poor
before but survived, and that she wants the man she married back. She's
seen a solicitor to initiate divorce. They have a huge fight but both
characters are a bit laconic and neither raises a voice. Neither one
wants to keep the house as both children are adults.
Thursday writes his wife a long letter but we aren't shown its contents.
He screws up his courage and returns both payoffs to Jago.
There's a big Wild West confrontation at the quarry/mining operation.
The construction contractor is there, one of the principles in the
conspiracy, also a Mason who also tried to influence Strange to block
the investigations. This was actually to be the place that Morse was
executed, but all four men show up.
Because the war is fought with exposition rather than shooting and Jago
is present but not Box, Morse immediately figures out that it was Jago
who took over the rackets from the local mobster (was he killed or did
he simply disappear?), including all the heroin laced with quinine
deaths that Strange has been investigating. DeBryn the pathologist was
also kidnapped. Box is corrupt and has covered up murders but he has no
stomach to cover up the murders of multiple police officers to keep the
conspiracy going. Jago admits that all the deaths with a gun
Box took off some criminal, including Fancy's, were actually Jago's
because Jago is the expositioning villain.
Jago claims he can write a convincing report blaming all the corruption
on the four men and that they shot each other dead for REASONS. Could
this possibly be foreshadowing?
Bright makes the bold pronouncemet: Jago may have influence over patrol
and C.I.D., but he has no influence over Traffic! At that moment, I was
expecting Bright's men to swoop in as a motorcycle calvary, which might
have been fun, but that doesn't happen. Instead, the villains run for
high ground and it's a race to see who can get the drop on whom.
So we can resolve the scene, Thursday pursues Jago but Jago gets the
drop on him in a movie-style confrontation in which Jago sticks the gun
in Thursday's face. In the real world, you don't do that because that
has put the gun within reach of the guy you're trying to kill. Somehow, Morse
and Box get there. Morse knows enough to point his gun at Jago from a
distance away.
Remember the foreshadowing? Box stops Jago, shooting him dead with one
shot but not before Jago got off a shot, traumatically injuring Box. He
hasn't died by the end of the episode.
Back at the station, Bright explains the report that he's going to
write, closing the books on the corruption and avenging Fancy's death,
again, something no viewer remembers the details of from a year earlier.
Thusday gets a field promotion from Bright, so he's still not as high as
he was last season. Hadn't he been demoted two steps? Strange will
return to Thames Valley as Bright's right-hand man.
Morse gets Bright's gratitude but no promotion.
He's Thursday's right hand man though.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Thursday returns home. His wife is lit so she glows and we know that
Thursday is once again a man in her eyes.
Bright returns to his wife. At first I thought she'd died but looking
again, she's either sleeping or passed out on a couch as I can see
shallow breathing.
We see Morse purchase a house that he got cheap 'cuz dead junkies were
found in it at the episode's beginning. Also, the police motor pool have
repaired the Jag. All those years of Inspector Morse, I thought Morse
was driving his personal Jag (remember, Lewis never drove him) and not a
company car.
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.

Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
suzeeq
2019-07-08 17:57:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Our friend tomcervo pointed out that this was cut from the first
episode and sets up a bit of the plot for one scene.
http://youtu.be/jUNi0BN9oAM
Tons of revelations in this episode, with various dangling plot points
wrapped up from the previous season that no viewer remembers much
about from a long year ago, and no one liked enough to re-watch episods.
At college, the chief librarian of (I forget the name of the library) is
Bodleian.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
murdered. He was part of a group of ramblers, walkers who went on great
treks through the beautiful countryside, nearly none of which we saw.
Immediate suspects are two professors using the library, including one
who enjoyed reading erotic prose from the Edwardian era that was in a
special collection not generally accessible. He said he was writing a
paper but it wasn't his field.
Morse completely violated his privacy by obtaining records of everything
he borrowed. I really have no idea what Morse was thinking unless he
wanted to read the literature himself.
There was also a wealthy family that donated a stamp collection to the
same library. This library's collections are certainly eclectic. The
other professor was going through those. The family's name was
Teagarden, but it's supposed to be Baumgarten. They were Jewish and only
a handful escaped Germany before the rest perished in a bombed WWII
labor camp, including a well-known physicist.
Treegarden, not Teagarden. Baum is german for 'tree'.
I recall a closeup of "Teagarden" at some point. Also, the character
played by Laura Donoughue (in the UK, there are not enough Jewish actors
to play Jews) was listed as Deborah Teagarden in closing credits. She
wasn't saying that the immigration official translated from the German,
just got it wrong.
I was sure I heard Treegarden. Must bee those brit accents.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
I know how she feels. My uncommon last name is said to be something
written down in error by immigration and the family name from Poland or
Russia was forgotten.
They got my last name right, but there's 8 different ways to spell it.
That's on immigration.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Turns out that the second professor was harassing the first professor,
who had promised to use his influence with a counselate to get them out
of Germany. The first professor was an admirer of the physicist. This
part of the story made no sense, that anyone could believe that the
first professor had any kind of contact to set up an immigration or
refugee visa. The second professor was in love with the physicist's
daughter and blamed the first professor for failing to help them. The
first professor had notebooks from the famous physicist but they
demonstrated advanced senility and he destroyed them to hide his
condition and not call into question his earlier work.
That's certainly fortunate, because what would have been the
implications of a Jewish prisoner of the state inadvertently
contributing to the German war effort if he hadn't been senile at this
time?
These two professors had nothing to do with the murders.
Meanwhile, a brand-new council housing high rise building collapsed. It's
daytime, limiting the deaths and injuries to women and children. If it
had been overnight, far more people could have been killed.
I tried a quick Goog to see what ripped-from-the-headlines news story
this was based on but didn't spot anything. Do any of our friends from
the UK recall this?
It's a reinforced concrete structure. Morse would figure out that the
corrupt building contractor substituted aggregate in the concrete
mixture made from sand mined from the ocean and not aggregate from a
nearby quarry that the Council was charged for, and pocketed the
difference. Salt in the mixture caused immediate corrosion in the rebar.
As far as I know, the structural ill effects would take place slowly
over time and wouldn't lead to immediate catastrophic failure within a
few months of completion.
This was discovered by the Council building inspector a year earlier, a
fellow rambler friend of the librarian's. He was shot in the back and
his corpse hidden in the Council housing project, exposed with the
building's collapse.
Morse then concludes, with no evidence, that the librarian had been
killed as he was looking into the disappearance of his friend.
There's a corrupt politician covering everything up. We already knew
about the Acting Chief Constable's corruption, I guess, probably from
dialogue last season. He's been mainly an off-screen character. Bright,
still in Traffic, is called into a metting with the politician and the
ACC and told to end Morse's investigation. Bright points out that Morse
isn't in his chain of command and also flat out tells the politician
that he won't be his friend. This leads to the attempt of Bright's life
and the amusing way in which the attempt is thwarted.
Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him. A
I think it was his brother in law, or a close friend who persuaded him
to invest their entire life savings with him. Which he either lost, or
fled the country with.
It was nothing to do with the ongoing corruption? Ok.
Could have been, but I think it was someone outside the police. Or maybe
that was the friend.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
very weak Thursday succumbed to Box's entreties and accepted a payoff.
His wife immediately knows what's up and tells him that she won't take
the money. In this episode, Jago hands Thursday a second payoff RIGHT IN
THE POLICE STATION, which is absurd. In another conversation with his
wife, after not speaking her mind for a year, Win finally tells him that
she doesn't care that they don't have money, that they've been poor
before but survived, and that she wants the man she married back. She's
seen a solicitor to initiate divorce. They have a huge fight but both
characters are a bit laconic and neither raises a voice. Neither one
wants to keep the house as both children are adults.
Thursday writes his wife a long letter but we aren't shown its contents.
He screws up his courage and returns both payoffs to Jago.
There's a big Wild West confrontation at the quarry/mining operation.
The construction contractor is there, one of the principles in the
conspiracy, also a Mason who also tried to influence Strange to block
the investigations. This was actually to be the place that Morse was
executed, but all four men show up.
Because the war is fought with exposition rather than shooting and Jago
is present but not Box, Morse immediately figures out that it was Jago
who took over the rackets from the local mobster (was he killed or did
he simply disappear?), including all the heroin laced with quinine
deaths that Strange has been investigating. DeBryn the pathologist was
also kidnapped. Box is corrupt and has covered up murders but he has no
stomach to cover up the murders of multiple police officers to keep the
conspiracy going. Jago admits that all the deaths with a gun
Box took off some criminal, including Fancy's, were actually Jago's
because Jago is the expositioning villain.
Jago claims he can write a convincing report blaming all the corruption
on the four men and that they shot each other dead for REASONS. Could
this possibly be foreshadowing?
Bright makes the bold pronouncemet: Jago may have influence over patrol
and C.I.D., but he has no influence over Traffic! At that moment, I was
expecting Bright's men to swoop in as a motorcycle calvary, which might
have been fun, but that doesn't happen. Instead, the villains run for
high ground and it's a race to see who can get the drop on whom.
So we can resolve the scene, Thursday pursues Jago but Jago gets the
drop on him in a movie-style confrontation in which Jago sticks the gun
in Thursday's face. In the real world, you don't do that because that
has put the gun within reach of the guy you're trying to kill. Somehow, Morse
and Box get there. Morse knows enough to point his gun at Jago from a
distance away.
Remember the foreshadowing? Box stops Jago, shooting him dead with one
shot but not before Jago got off a shot, traumatically injuring Box. He
hasn't died by the end of the episode.
Back at the station, Bright explains the report that he's going to
write, closing the books on the corruption and avenging Fancy's death,
again, something no viewer remembers the details of from a year earlier.
Thusday gets a field promotion from Bright, so he's still not as high as
he was last season. Hadn't he been demoted two steps? Strange will
return to Thames Valley as Bright's right-hand man.
Morse gets Bright's gratitude but no promotion.
He's Thursday's right hand man though.
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Thursday returns home. His wife is lit so she glows and we know that
Thursday is once again a man in her eyes.
Bright returns to his wife. At first I thought she'd died but looking
again, she's either sleeping or passed out on a couch as I can see
shallow breathing.
We see Morse purchase a house that he got cheap 'cuz dead junkies were
found in it at the episode's beginning. Also, the police motor pool have
repaired the Jag. All those years of Inspector Morse, I thought Morse
was driving his personal Jag (remember, Lewis never drove him) and not a
company car.
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.
Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
I wasn't.

I figured out they'd used the wrong sand to cut corners as soon as Morse
was down on the beach. I thought the damage was because that sand was
wetter than the quarry sand and weakened the concrete. Because one of
the teneants showed Joan and her boss the wet spot on the wall.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-07-08 18:38:43 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.
Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
I wasn't.
Doctor Who was low-budget television. Nearly every location used for an
alien planet was an abandoned mine or quarry. It got to be such a joke
that they used to make fun of it in dialogue. This location used for
this episode just made me reminisce about Doctor Who.
Post by suzeeq
I figured out they'd used the wrong sand to cut corners as soon as Morse
was down on the beach. I thought the damage was because that sand was
wetter than the quarry sand and weakened the concrete. Because one of
the teneants showed Joan and her boss the wet spot on the wall.
Yeah, the weeping wall made no sense, which indicates water entering the
building from outside, not complete failure of the rebar.
suzeeq
2019-07-08 19:00:12 UTC
Reply
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.
Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
I wasn't.
Doctor Who was low-budget television. Nearly every location used for an
alien planet was an abandoned mine or quarry. It got to be such a joke
that they used to make fun of it in dialogue. This location used for
this episode just made me reminisce about Doctor Who.
Post by suzeeq
I figured out they'd used the wrong sand to cut corners as soon as Morse
was down on the beach. I thought the damage was because that sand was
wetter than the quarry sand and weakened the concrete. Because one of
the teneants showed Joan and her boss the wet spot on the wall.
Yeah, the weeping wall made no sense, which indicates water entering the
building from outside, not complete failure of the rebar.
BTW I researched a little on last season. The man who absconded with
Thursday's money was his brother Charlie.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-07-08 19:06:12 UTC
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Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
Post by Adam H. Kerman
. . .
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.
Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
I wasn't.
Doctor Who was low-budget television. Nearly every location used for an
alien planet was an abandoned mine or quarry. It got to be such a joke
that they used to make fun of it in dialogue. This location used for
this episode just made me reminisce about Doctor Who.
Post by suzeeq
I figured out they'd used the wrong sand to cut corners as soon as Morse
was down on the beach. I thought the damage was because that sand was
wetter than the quarry sand and weakened the concrete. Because one of
the teneants showed Joan and her boss the wet spot on the wall.
Yeah, the weeping wall made no sense, which indicates water entering the
building from outside, not complete failure of the rebar.
BTW I researched a little on last season. The man who absconded with
Thursday's money was his brother Charlie.
Ok. There was a reference to this in dialogue in this episode but I
didn't recall anything. But now that you remind me, I recall that it was
badly written crap that made the previous season largely unentertaining.
David Barnett
2019-07-12 04:08:42 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by suzeeq
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was smaller on the inside than on the out.
Lol
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Speaking of Doctor Who, who was expected the TARDIS to materialize
during one of the quary scenes?
Lol
--
David Barnett
Ed Stasiak
2019-07-08 19:33:48 UTC
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suzeeq
Adam H. Kerman
Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him.
I think it was his brother in law, or a close friend who persuaded him
to invest their entire life savings with him. Which he either lost, or fled
the country with.
It was Thursday’s brother, who had some kinda import business and he got
involved with the mob who used his business to run up all kinda debt and
then left him hanging, (same as Tony Soprano did with his gambler buddy
who owned the sporting goods store) so he borrowed Thursday’s life savings
to pay the mob off to leave him alone but they just took the money and after
explaining to Thursday that his money was gone, the brother and his family
ran off IIRC.

Also, Morse banged the brother's hottie daughter (before he knew who
she was).
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was the same house from the “Inspector Morse” series.
suzeeq
2019-07-08 21:13:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
suzeeq
Adam H. Kerman
Thursday, still miserable about events I've forgotten from last season.
He made some bad decision that led to a complete loss of his savings or
somehing? His marriage has collapsed. His wife isn't speaking to him.
I think it was his brother in law, or a close friend who persuaded him
to invest their entire life savings with him. Which he either lost, or fled
the country with.
It was Thursday’s brother, who had some kinda import business and he got
involved with the mob who used his business to run up all kinda debt and
then left him hanging, (same as Tony Soprano did with his gambler buddy
who owned the sporting goods store) so he borrowed Thursday’s life savings
to pay the mob off to leave him alone but they just took the money and after
explaining to Thursday that his money was gone, the brother and his family
ran off IIRC.
Yeah, I knew it was something like that. Thanks for the details.
Also, Morse banged the brother's hottie daughter (before he knew who
she was).
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
I didn't watch much of Morse, but I knew it was a house, not apartment.
I think there were shots of it from the outside.
It was the same house from the “Inspector Morse” series.
RichA
2019-07-08 18:02:01 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Adam H. Kerman
The house Morse purchases is rather large for one person. What I recall
from the original series was Morse's home consistet of a living room,
only, in which he listened to music and drank. Morse never ate so there
was no kitchen set. We never had the impression that it was anything but
a small, efficient apartment for a man who owned nothing but records.
Don't remember Morse's comment from "Inspector Morse?" "Starter homes..."
ZZyXX
2019-07-08 18:39:35 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
There was also a wealthy family that donated a stamp collection to the
same library. This library's collections are certainly eclectic. The
other professor was going through those. The family's name was
Teagarden, but it's supposed to be Baumgarten. They were Jewish and only
a handful escaped Germany before the rest perished in a bombed WWII
labor camp, including a well-known physicist.
the Mittlewerk Camp may have been bombed, but the vast majority of
fatalities was caused by being worked to death, the rest by guards just
having fun with prisoners

I thought that when the name "Dora" first appeared, we'd see that
professor turn out to be a Nazi Officer at the Mittlewerks
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