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Civility Project ends
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Barb May
2011-01-14 03:24:03 UTC
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The Civility Pledge

* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.

"The worst e-mails I received about the civility project were from
conservatives with just unbelievable language about communists, and some
words I wouldn't use in this phone call," he said. "This political
divide has become so sharp that everything is black and white, and too
many conservatives can see no redeeming value in any liberal or
Democrat. That would probably be true about some liberals going the
other direction, but I didn't hear from them." -- co-founder Mark
DeMoss, a Republican and prominent evangelical Christian
--
Barb
Ubiquitous
2011-01-14 16:46:52 UTC
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Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
Hypocrisy noted. And you posted this off-topic article here because?

---
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
Barb May
2011-01-14 17:04:17 UTC
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Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
Hypocrisy noted. And you posted this off-topic article here because?
Oh, the irony!
--
Barb
Steve Newport
2011-01-15 06:52:11 UTC
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From: ***@nonofyourbusinessx.tv (Barb=A0May) Oh, the irony!
---------------------------------------
SN: There is no bigger hypocrite than Mike "Ubiquitous" Weber.
trotsky
2011-01-15 13:39:44 UTC
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Post by Steve Newport
---------------------------------------
SN: There is no bigger hypocrite than Mike "Ubiquitous" Weber.
Or, put another way, he's the most ubiquitous hypocrite.
Steve Newport
2011-01-15 20:48:52 UTC
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From: ***@email.com (trotsky)
Mike "Ubiquitous" Weber: the most ubiquitous hypocrite.
---------------------------------
SN: Should be his sig.
Ubiquitous
2011-02-04 10:43:51 UTC
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Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause describes the group as "a nonpartisan, grassroots
organization dedicated to restoring the core values of American democracy,
reinventing an open, honest and accountable government that serves the public
interest, and empowering ordinary people to make their voices heard in the
political process."

The bio of Common Cause's president, Bob Edgar--a former Democratic
congressman from Pennsylvania--informs us that "under Bob's leadership, Common
Cause is championing a number of critical issues and reforms, including the
public funding of political campaigns at all levels, election reforms that
make voting more accurate, secure and accessible, improved ethics at all
levels of government, redistricting reform and a diverse and open media."

It all sounds very high-minded. How's it working out in practice?

On Sunday, Common Cause hosted a panel discussion called "Uncloaking the
Kochs," which, according to the Common Cause website, "was followed by a rally
outside the posh Rancho Las Palmas resort where the Koch brothers were holding
one of their political strategy meetings." The Koch brothers' support of
free-market causes makes them enemies of "democracy," in Common Cause's view.

Christian Hartsock, a videographer who contributes to Andrew Breitbart's
BigGovernment.com, attended the Common Cause rally and produced a devastating
four-minute video of his interactions with the Common Causer supporters.

His coverage of the rally opens with an ingenuous twentysomething white woman
holding forth: "There's a devastating influence in our country, and it's
coming from fear and anger and widespread misunderstanding of what's actually
causing the problems in our society. And I think that the racist Tea Party is
one example of that, and it makes me feel ashamed to be an American."

This is followed by clips of Hartsock's other interactions with Common Cause
ralliers, some of which we've transcribed:

Hartsock: After we impeach Clarence Thomas, what do we do with him?
Let's keep it real.

Middle-aged white man with mustache: Put him in--put him in--put
him back in the, um--put him back in the fields. I mean, he's a
scumbag.Hartsock: Yeah!Mustache: He's a dumb sh-- scumbag. Put
him back in the fields!

Hartsock: But what about Alito?

Mustache: Alito should--Alito should go back to Sicily.

Hartsock: Yeah. But what about Fox News?

Mustache: Fox News? That's a mis--misappropriation of the English
language. There is no news on Fox.

Hartsock: So what do we do with them?

Mustache: Break Rupert Murdoch. Never--never give him a dime. I
never turn on Fox, I never give a cent to Rupert Murdoch, and
every day I vote with my dollars.Hartsock: What do we do with
Roger Ailes? What do we do with Roger Ailes?Mustache: Roger Ailes
should be strung up and--but, ah, I don't know. Kill the bastard.

[Change of scene]

Hartsock: Justice for Anita Hill. What do we do?

Young woman with sunglasses and nose ring 1: We cut off his toes
one by one and feed them to him. . . .

[Change of scene]

Hartsock: What do you say we do with Clarence Thomas after we
impeach him?

Young woman with sunglasses and nose ring 2: Bad things.

Hartsock: Like what?

Nose ring 2: I dunno, 'cause I'm all about peace, but I would
say torture.

[Change of scene]

Hartsock: [After] we impeach Clarence Thomas, what do we do with him?

Middle-aged woman with squeaky voice: What do we do with him?
String him up. And his wife, too. Let's get rid of Ginny.

Hartsock: And then what?

Squeaky: Start all over. Scalia, uh, who are the other a--h---s?
I'm sorry.

Hartsock: No, it's OK.

Squeaky: Yeah.

Hartsock: String 'em up, eh?

Squeaky: String 'em up.

Unidentified off-camera male voice: No Koch, no way!

Squeaky: Thomas--Thomas, his wife, Scalia, Roberts--oh my God!

[Change of scene]

Hartsock: After we impeach Clarence Thomas, what should we do
with him?

Unidentified off-screen male voice: [unintelligible]

Young man with sunglasses: I don't want to--

Young woman with unpierced nose: I can't say that. I don't want
to be on camera saying that.

Hartsock: Saying what? You can say--you can say anything, we're
all friends.

Sunglasses: Hang him.

A caveat is in order. As is often the case with material published on
Breitbart's websites, Hartsock's methods would be unethical by the highest
standards of institutional journalism. By framing his queries in the first
person plural--"what do we do . . .?"--he arguably crosses the line between
asking questions and goading his sources. At least one of his comments--"we're
all friends"--is plainly deceptive.

That said, it appears from the video that the violent and racist sentiments
originate with the Common Cause supporters; Hartsock prompts them with
relatively innocuous cues about impeachment and Anita Hill. And there is no
question that the Common Causers express their ugly sentiments with great
relish.

Further, the formerly mainstream media, in their determination to cast the Tea
Party movement as violent and racist, have frequently violated their own
ethical principles--among other ways, by reporting uncorroborated claims as if
they were established fact ("Tea Party Protesters Scream 'Nigger' at Black
Congressmen," reads a March 2010 McClatchy Newspapers headline) and even by
lying outright (Paul Krugman's false claim, in the New York Times no less,
that Michele Bachmann had used "eliminationist rhetoric").

We'd venture to say that Hartsock has provided more evidence that Common Cause
is a violent, racist movement than all the media put together have done
vis-à-vis the Tea Party.

To be sure, there is no reason to think that Bob Edgar or other officials of
Common Cause advocate violence against Supreme Court justices or media
executives, that they approve of such violent fantasies, or that they
personally hold racially or ethnically bigoted opinions. But Common Cause does
describe itself as a "grassroots organization."




---
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
trotsky
2011-02-04 13:44:47 UTC
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Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause describes the group
Plagiarism alert.
Barb May
2011-02-04 23:53:46 UTC
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Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause
Common Cause has nothing to do with The Civility Project.

The Civility Project was started by conservative activist Mark DeMoss
and it asked governors and members of Congress to sign a pledge. Four
years later DeMoss shut down the project after securing pledges from
only three members of Congress.

DeMoss said this in his press release:
"Perhaps one of the most surprising results of this project has been the
tone and language used by many of those posting comments on our website
and following articles on various media websites about the project. Many
of them could not be printed or spoken in public media due to vulgar
language and vicious personal attacks. Sadly, a majority of these came
from fellow conservatives."
--
Barb
Ubiquitous
2011-02-05 01:00:00 UTC
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Post by Barb May
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause describes the group as "a nonpartisan,
grassroots organization dedicated to restoring the core values of
American democracy, reinventing an open, honest and accountable
government that serves the public interest, and empowering ordinary
people to make their voices heard in the political process."
Common Cause has nothing to do with The Civility Project.
Nonresponse noted.

Over the weekend Common Cause held a rally in California at which
numerous supporters of the self-styled "grassroots organization" were
caught on video advocating violence against Supreme Court justices and
media executives--including calls to lynch the high court's only black
member.

"Common Cause's 40 year history of holding power accountable has been
marked by a commitment to decency and civility--in public and private,"
begins a press release from the organization yesterday. Yet in contrast
with SarahPAC, which removed from its website its famous map of targeted
districts after the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords,
CommonCause.org's homepage still prominently features a photo and
denunciation of Justices Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia, who were
among the objects of the Common Cause supporters' violent--and, in
Thomas's case, racist--fantasies.

The press release is framed as a condemnation of the Common Cause
supporters--or, in the group's unwieldy description of them, "a few of
those attending the events around a gathering Common Cause helped to
organize Sunday near Palm Springs." The statement goes on:

Anyone who has attended a public event has encountered
people whose ideas or acts misrepresented, even embarrassed,
the gathering. Every sporting event has its share of "fans"
whose boorish behavior on the sidelines makes a mockery of
good sportsmanship; every political gathering has a crude
sign-painter or epithet-spewing heckler.

Everybody does it? Think it through and you will see that this is a
stunning indictment of the American left.

To begin with, it is not true that everybody does it. As we noted
yesterday, the formerly mainstream media have spent the past two years
trying to depict the Tea Party as precisely the sort of racist, hateful,
violent political movement that Common Cause appears in the video to be.
That media effort has failed, not for lack of will but for lack of
evidence. If everybody did it, the Tea Party would do it, and if the Tea
Party did it, you would have read about it in the New York Times.

In claiming that everybody does it, Common Cause is committing the
fallacy known as hasty generalization: drawing an overbroad conclusion
based on a statistically insufficient sample. A famous example from
politics is the apocryphal quote attributed to the late Pauline Kael,
film critic of The New Yorker: "I don't understand how Nixon won.
Everybody I know voted for McGovern."

In reality, Kael was more self-aware than that. What she actually said,
as reported by the Times in December 1972, was: "I live in a rather
special world. I only know one person who voted for Nixon." But you see
how the fallacy works: By her own account, Kael led a parochial life,
seldom venturing outside her "special world." If she _had_ mistaken her
circle of acquaintances for a representative sample of Americans, she
would have been mystified by the election outcome.

It seems clear that the people who wrote and approved this press
release--who are anonymous except for Mary Boyle, vice president for
communications, who is listed as "contact"--also live in a rather
special world. They are basing their generalities about "anyone who has
ever attended a public event" and "every political gathering" on their
own experience.

That is to say, the monstrousness seen at the Common Cause rally is
within the typical range of behavior _at the sort of political
gatherings that Common Cause executives attend_. That is much more
damning of the left than the Common Cause rally taken in isolation.

There is another rich irony to Common Cause's "condemnation" of its
rally's participants. The purpose of the event was "to call public
attention to the political power of . . . corporations, their focus on
expanding that power, and the dangers it presents to our democracy."
Common Cause is targeting Justices Scalia and Thomas because they voted
with the majority in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, the
2010 decision that--as Common Cause put it in a fund-raising appeal last
year--"inexplicably gave corporations the same rights as individuals" to
engage in political speech.

(As an aside, if the guys at Common Cause think Citizens United is
inexplicable, perhaps they failed to read the court's carefully reasoned
57-page opinion. It was written by Justice Anthony Kennedy, whom Common
Cause "inexplicably" does not target in its hate campaign.)

Common Cause's position is that only individuals, not corporations, have
the right to free speech. So what is Common Cause? As we noted above,
its website describes it as a "grassroots organization." But that term
has no legal meaning. As Common Cause's "Frequently Asked Questions"
explains, the group is a "a 501(c)(4) nonprofit, tax exempt
organization." A corporation, just like Citizens United.

So here we have a corporation that advertises itself as a "grassroots
organization" while exercising its First Amendment rights to advance the
position that corporations do not have First Amendment rights, only
individuals do. Some individuals, participating in the corporation's
"grassroots" rally, exercise their First Amendment rights in ways that
harm the corporation's image. The corporation responds by exercising its
First Amendment rights to denounce those individuals for having
exercised their First Amendment rights. And it does so in its capacity
as a faceless corporation, by issuing a statement for which no
individual--not even CEO Bob Edgar--takes responsibility.

For the sake of truth in advertising, Common Cause should change its
name to Hypocrisy Hub.
--
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
--
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
Barb May
2011-02-07 19:28:03 UTC
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Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause describes the group as "a nonpartisan,
grassroots organization dedicated to restoring the core values of
American democracy, reinventing an open, honest and accountable
government that serves the public interest, and empowering ordinary
people to make their voices heard in the political process."
Common Cause has nothing to do with The Civility Project.
Nonresponse noted.
You falsely claim I didn't respond, but as I correctly pointed out, your
attempt to link the Civility Project with Common Cause was totally
bogus. There was nothing more to say.

Then you have the audacity to post yet another Taranto column without
any attribution.

As usual, Taranto attempts to make a mountain out of a molehill in
pursuit of his right-wing, corporate-fellating agenda. He lied about the
Common Cause press release which stated in unambiguous terms, "We
condemn bigotry and hate speech in every form, even when it comes from
those who fancy themselves as our friends." Taranto's characterization
of the press release, "Everybody does it?" is an outrageous lie. Common
Cause correctly pointed out that most large public gatherings attract
kooks. That is a statement of fact and NOT equivalent in any way to
saying "Everybody does it."

Taranto is a serial liar and you're his butt boy.
--
Barb
Tom
2011-02-24 18:47:10 UTC
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Post by Barb May
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
   * will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
   * will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
   * will stand against incivility when I see it.
The website of Common Cause describes the group as "a nonpartisan,
grassroots organization dedicated to restoring the core values of
American democracy, reinventing an open, honest and accountable
government that serves the public interest, and empowering ordinary
people to make their voices heard in the political process."
Common Cause has nothing to do with The Civility Project.
Nonresponse noted.
You falsely claim I didn't respond, but as I correctly pointed out, your
attempt to link the Civility Project with Common Cause was totally
bogus. There was nothing more to say.
Then you have the audacity to post yet another Taranto column without
any attribution.
As usual, Taranto attempts to make a mountain out of a molehill in
pursuit of his right-wing, corporate-fellating agenda. He lied about the
Common Cause press release which stated in unambiguous terms, "We
condemn bigotry and hate speech in every form, even when it comes from
those who fancy themselves as our friends." Taranto's characterization
of the press release, "Everybody does it?" is an outrageous lie. Common
Cause correctly pointed out that most large public gatherings attract
kooks. That is a statement of fact and NOT equivalent in any way to
saying "Everybody does it."
Taranto is a serial liar and you're his butt boy.
--
Barb
Douchey Ubi goes through life with his fingers permanently in his ears
all the while saying na na na na na over and over.

It makes one wonder what he uses to type.

Tom
Ubiquitous
2011-02-24 02:32:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
"The unions should make their voices heard and push back hard," editorializes
the New York Times, one of the few newspapers to support the Wisconsin
antitaxpayer revolt unreservedly. "Push back hard" must be a macro on the
computers over at the Times editorial page, which demanded back in August that
supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque "push back hard" against ordinary
Americans. In the meantime, of course, the Times has delivered many a pious
lecture on the evil of "incivility" in politics.

It's quite striking the way almost every lie the left ever told about the Tea
Party has turned out to be true of the government unionists in Wisconsin and
their supporters:

• Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist signs
likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators. Left-wing journalists are
making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers Toppled a Dictator in Egypt,
but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read the headline of a Washington Post
column by Harold Meyerson last week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a
Madison crowd chanting, "Kill the bill"--which was said to be violent and
invidious a year ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.

• Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison, posted a
video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in support of the
unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting verbatim), "whoever video
taped this has no life and should be shot in the head." Unlike Frances Fox
Piven, Althouse has never advocated violence, but don't expect the Times to
give this the kind of coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received
threatening emails.

• Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake grassroots
movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic National
Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the 2008 Obama
campaign--is playing an active role in organizing protests." A blogger at the
OFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To our allies in the labor movement, to
our brothers and sisters in public work, we stand with you, and we stand
strong." We've also received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry, MOO, we're
working at home today.

• Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a majority in
the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state, taking advantage of the
body's rules to deny the majority a quorum. The Indianapolis Star reports that
Democrats from the Indiana House are employing the same tactic. Even Barack
Obama, when he was an Illinois senator, usually voted "present."

• Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea Party
signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them are teachers!
Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for Negotiatins [sic]." Also, some of the
teachers' tactics--in particular, fraudulently calling in sick and exploiting
other people's children by enlisting them as protesters--seem not only
unethical but calculated to repel the public. One blessing of low standards
for public school teachers is that it ensures many of them are not bright
enough to stage an effective protest.

The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by the
Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.


---
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the 21st
century."
tomcervo
2011-02-24 02:36:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
   * will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
   * will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
   * will stand against incivility when I see it.
"The unions should make their voices heard and push back hard," editorializes
the New York Times, one of the few newspapers to support the Wisconsin
antitaxpayer revolt unreservedly. "Push back hard" must be a macro on the
computers over at the Times editorial page, which demanded back in August that
supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque "push back hard" against ordinary
Americans. In the meantime, of course, the Times has delivered many a pious
lecture on the evil of "incivility" in politics.
It's quite striking the way almost every lie the left ever told about the Tea
Party has turned out to be true of the government unionists in Wisconsin and
Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist signs
likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators. Left-wing journalists are
making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers Toppled a Dictator in Egypt,
but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read the headline of a Washington Post
column by Harold Meyerson last week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a
Madison crowd chanting, "Kill the bill"--which was said to be violent and
invidious a year ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.
Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison, posted a
video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in support of the
unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting verbatim), "whoever video
taped this has no life and should be shot in the head." Unlike Frances Fox
Piven, Althouse has never advocated violence, but don't expect the Times to
give this the kind of coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received
threatening emails.
Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake grassroots
movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic National
Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the 2008 Obama
campaign--is playing an active role in organizing protests." A blogger at theOFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To our allies in the labor movement, to
our brothers and sisters in public work, we stand with you, and we stand
strong." We've also received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry, MOO, we're
working at home today.
Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a majority in
the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state, taking advantage of the
body's rules to deny the majority a quorum. The Indianapolis Star reports that
Democrats from the Indiana House are employing the same tactic. Even Barack
Obama, when he was an Illinois senator, usually voted "present."
Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea Party
signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them are teachers!
Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for Negotiatins [sic]." Also, some of the
teachers' tactics--in particular, fraudulently calling in sick and exploiting
other people's children by enlisting them as protesters--seem not only
unethical but calculated to repel the public. One blessing of low standards
for public school teachers is that it ensures many of them are not bright
enough to stage an effective protest.
The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by the
Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.
---  
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the 21st
century."
Non attribution (James Taranto, if the overall sweatiness of the prose
is an indicator) noted.
Get back to us when you can string three sentences of your own
together.
Ubiquitous
2011-02-24 02:54:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tomcervo
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
   * will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
   * will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
   * will stand against incivility when I see it.
"The unions should make their voices heard and push back hard," editorializes
the New York Times, one of the few newspapers to support the Wisconsin
antitaxpayer revolt unreservedly. "Push back hard" must be a macro on the
computers over at the Times editorial page, which demanded back in August that
supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque "push back hard" against ordinary
Americans. In the meantime, of course, the Times has delivered many a pious
lecture on the evil of "incivility" in politics.
It's quite striking the way almost every lie the left ever told about the Tea
Party has turned out to be true of the government unionists in Wisconsin and
Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist signs
likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators. Left-wing journalists are
making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers Toppled a Dictator in Egypt,
but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read the headline of a Washington Post
column by Harold Meyerson last week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a
Madison crowd chanting, "Kill the bill"--which was said to be violent and
invidious a year ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.
Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison, posted a
video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in support of the
unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting verbatim), "whoever video
taped this has no life and should be shot in the head." Unlike Frances Fox
Piven, Althouse has never advocated violence, but don't expect the Times to
give this the kind of coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received
threatening emails.
Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake grassroots
movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic National
Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the 2008 Obama
campaign--is playing an active role in organizing protests." A blogger at
theOFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To our allies in the l
our brothers and sisters in public work, we stand with you, and we stand
strong." We've also received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry, MOO, we're
working at home today.
Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a majority in
the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state, taking advantage of the
body's rules to deny the majority a quorum. The Indianapolis Star reports that
Democrats from the Indiana House are employing the same tactic. Even Barack
Obama, when he was an Illinois senator, usually voted "present."
Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea Party
signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them are teachers!
Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for Negotiatins [sic]." Also, some of the
teachers' tactics--in particular, fraudulently calling in sick and exploiting
other people's children by enlisting them as protesters--seem not only
unethical but calculated to repel the public. One blessing of low standards
for public school teachers is that it ensures many of them are not bright
enough to stage an effective protest.
The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by the
Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.
Non attribution (James Taranto, if the overall sweatiness of the prose
is an indicator) noted.
Strawman noted. Get back to us when you have a real argument to make.
--
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the
21st century."
tomcervo
2011-02-24 03:35:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tomcervo
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
"The unions should make their voices heard and push back hard," editorializes
the New York Times, one of the few newspapers to support the Wisconsin
antitaxpayer revolt unreservedly. "Push back hard" must be a macro on the
computers over at the Times editorial page, which demanded back in August that
supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque "push back hard" against ordinary
Americans. In the meantime, of course, the Times has delivered many a pious
lecture on the evil of "incivility" in politics.
It's quite striking the way almost every lie the left ever told about the Tea
Party has turned out to be true of the government unionists in Wisconsin and
Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist signs
likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators. Left-wing journalists are
making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers Toppled a Dictator in Egypt,
but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read the headline of a Washington Post
column by Harold Meyerson last week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a
Madison crowd chanting, "Kill the bill"--which was said to be violent and
invidious a year ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.
Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison, posted a
video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in support of the
unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting verbatim), "whoever video
taped this has no life and should be shot in the head." Unlike Frances Fox
Piven, Althouse has never advocated violence, but don't expect the Times to
give this the kind of coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received
threatening emails.
Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake grassroots
movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic National
Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the 2008 Obama
campaign--is playing an active role in organizing protests." A blogger at
theOFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To our allies in the l
our brothers and sisters in public work, we stand with you, and we stand
strong." We've also received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry, MOO, we're
working at home today.
Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a majority in
the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state, taking advantage of the
body's rules to deny the majority a quorum. The Indianapolis Star reports that
Democrats from the Indiana House are employing the same tactic. Even Barack
Obama, when he was an Illinois senator, usually voted "present."
Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea Party
signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them are teachers!
Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for Negotiatins [sic]." Also, some of the
teachers' tactics--in particular, fraudulently calling in sick and exploiting
other people's children by enlisting them as protesters--seem not only
unethical but calculated to repel the public. One blessing of low standards
for public school teachers is that it ensures many of them are not bright
enough to stage an effective protest.
The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by the
Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.
Non attribution (James Taranto, if the overall sweatiness of the prose
is an indicator) noted.
Strawman noted.  Get back to us when you have a real argument to make.
That's one sentence short. Maybe you could tell us why you don't like
to credit a source you so clearly admire, unless, incredibly, you
actually think people will believe YOU wrote that?
Get back to us when you have more than a cut'n'paste and a macro in
response.
Tom
2011-02-24 18:48:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by tomcervo
Post by Ubiquitous
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
"The unions should make their voices heard and push back hard," editorializes
the New York Times, one of the few newspapers to support the Wisconsin
antitaxpayer revolt unreservedly. "Push back hard" must be a macro on the
computers over at the Times editorial page, which demanded back in August that
supporters of the Ground Zero Mosque "push back hard" against ordinary
Americans. In the meantime, of course, the Times has delivered many a pious
lecture on the evil of "incivility" in politics.
It's quite striking the way almost every lie the left ever told about the Tea
Party has turned out to be true of the government unionists in Wisconsin and
Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist signs
likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators. Left-wing journalists are
making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers Toppled a Dictator in Egypt,
but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read the headline of a Washington Post
column by Harold Meyerson last week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a
Madison crowd chanting, "Kill the bill"--which was said to be violent and
invidious a year ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.
Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison, posted a
video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in support of the
unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting verbatim), "whoever video
taped this has no life and should be shot in the head." Unlike Frances Fox
Piven, Althouse has never advocated violence, but don't expect the Times to
give this the kind of coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received
threatening emails.
Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake grassroots
movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic National
Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the 2008 Obama
campaign--is playing an active role in organizing protests." A blogger at
theOFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To our allies in the l
our brothers and sisters in public work, we stand with you, and we stand
strong." We've also received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry, MOO, we're
working at home today.
Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a majority in
the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state, taking advantage of the
body's rules to deny the majority a quorum. The Indianapolis Star reports that
Democrats from the Indiana House are employing the same tactic. Even Barack
Obama, when he was an Illinois senator, usually voted "present."
Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea Party
signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them are teachers!
Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for Negotiatins [sic]." Also, some of the
teachers' tactics--in particular, fraudulently calling in sick and exploiting
other people's children by enlisting them as protesters--seem not only
unethical but calculated to repel the public. One blessing of low standards
for public school teachers is that it ensures many of them are not bright
enough to stage an effective protest.
The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by the
Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.
Non attribution (James Taranto, if the overall sweatiness of the prose
is an indicator) noted.
Strawman noted.  Get back to us when you have a real argument to make.
Douchitude noted. Get back to us when you pull your head from your
ass.

Tom
Barb May
2011-02-24 18:50:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
When will you get it through your pea brain that the civility pledge was
created by a Republican for members of Congress, not the media and not
the general public?
. Extreme rhetoric. The Wisconsin Republican Party has produced what
Mediaite.org calls an "incredibly effective" video juxtaposing liberal
complaints about allegedly extremist Tea Party rhetoric with unionist
signs likening Gov. Walker to Hitler and other dictators.
Those signs are plants by far-right agitators.
Left-wing
journalists are making similar invidious comparisons: "Workers
Toppled a Dictator in Egypt, but Might Be Silenced in Wisconsin" read
the headline of a Washington Post column by Harold Meyerson last
week. The other day on CNN we saw scenes of a Madison crowd chanting,
"Kill the bill"--which was said
Said by whom?
to be violent and invidious a year
ago, when "the bill" was ObamaCare.
Bullshit.
. Violence. Blogress Ann Althouse, a state employee based in Madison,
posted a video of municipal salt trucks blowing their horns in
support of the unionists. A YouTube commenter responded (quoting
verbatim), "whoever video taped this has no life and should be shot
in the head." Unlike Frances Fox Piven, Althouse has never advocated
violence, but don't expect the Times to give this the kind of
coverage it gave Piven's claims that she had received threatening
emails.
Threatening emails are far more serious than what some boob wrote in the
YouTube comments. You want to talk about threatening comments? Take a
look at the comments section of any right-wing blog or even Yahoo news
stories. There's a mountain of violent rhetoric posted every day by
right-wingers. But let's ignore all that and point to one comment on
YouTube so we can make yet another false equivalency argument.
. Partisan AstroTurf. That's the Beltway term referring to a fake
grassroots movement. Politico reported last week that "the Democratic
National Committee's Organizing for America arm--the remnant of the
2008 Obama campaign--is playing an active role in organizing
protests." A blogger at the OFA website, BarackObama.com, writes: "To
our allies in the labor movement, to our brothers and sisters in
public work, we stand with you, and we stand strong."
Ooooh. Yeah, saying "we stand with you" -- that's an "active" role.
We've also
received emails from MoveOn.org, which says it's holding a
pro-unionist rally outside our offices later this afternoon. Sorry,
MOO, we're working at home today.
MoveOn holding a rally in support of Wisconsin teachers is not an
example of "Partisan AstroTurf."

Unlike the Teabaggers, the union protests in Wisconsin aren't being
bankrolled by right-wing lobbyists, think tanks and partisan hacks.
. Refusal to accept election results. Although Republicans have a
majority in the Wisconsin Senate, Democrats have fled the state,
taking advantage of the body's rules to deny the majority a quorum.
The Indianapolis Star reports that Democrats from the Indiana House
are employing the same tactic. Even Barack Obama, when he was an
Illinois senator, usually voted "present."
Do they also have fillibuster rules in Wisconsin that allow a minority
to kill a bill that the majority wants? That was how the Republicans in
the US Congress refused to accept election results.
. Stupidity. Remember "Teabonics," a photo album of misspelled Tea
Party signs? The unionists can't spell any better--and some of them
are teachers! Althouse got one photo of what we think is a woman
holding a sign that reads "
'Open for business' = Closed for
Negotiatins [sic]."
Oooooh. One photo of a misspelled sign. Yeah that proves that all
teachers are just as stupid as teabaggers -- not.
The one exception: So far we haven't seen any evidence of racism by
the Wisconsin unionists. But we're watching for it.
And if you don't see it you'll manfacture it, just like you did with the
bogus signs, and the bogus YouTube "threat"
--
Barb
Ubiquitous
2011-02-24 10:43:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Barb May
The Civility Pledge
* will be civil in my public discourse and behavior.
* will be respectful of others whether or not I agree with them.
* will stand against incivility when I see it.
The rhetoric around Wisconsin's government labor dispute is getting more
violent. NHJournal.com reports that Rep. Michael Capuano, a Massachusetts
Democrat, said this yesterday at a Boston "solidarity" rally: "I'm proud to be
here with people who understand that it's more than just sending an email to
get you going. Every once and awhile you need to get out on the streets and
get a little bloody when necessary."

The Boston Globe reports that the union crowd responded to Capuano's
exhortation with "cheers, whistles and applause" and that Capuano, issued a
written semiapology: "I strongly believe in standing up for worker rights and
my passion for preserving those rights may have gotten the best of me
yesterday in an unscripted speech. I wish I had used different language to
express my passion and I regret my choice of words."

It will not surprise you to learn that Capuano is another "civility"
hypocrite. On Jan. 9, the day after a madman in Tucson, Ariz., got a little
bloody, the Globe quoted him: "What the hell is going on? There's always some
degree of tension in politics; everybody knows the last couple of years
there's been an intentional increase in the degree of heat in political
discourse. . . . If nothing else good comes out of this, I'm hoping it causes
people to reconsider how they deal with things."

As Michael Barone notes, public-sector unions "are a mechanism by which every
taxpayer is forced to fund the Democratic Party," Capuano's party:

Unions, most of whose members are public employees, gave Democrats
some $400 million in the 2008 election cycle. The American Federation
of State, County and Municipal Employees, the biggest public employee
union, gave Democrats $90 million in the 2010 cycle.

Follow the money, Washington reporters like to say. The money in
this case comes from taxpayers, present and future, who are the
source of every penny of dues paid to public employee unions, who
in turn spend much of that money on politics, almost all of it
for Democrats.

Capuano's rhetoric at yesterday's rally was not just violent but
authoritarian. He urged _government employees_ to "get a little bloody"--to
commit violent acts against citizens, as if this were Libya. As we noted
yesterday, public sector "collective bargaining," in which public officials
"negotiate" with the unions that helped elect them, is essentially a
conspiracy to steal money from taxpayers. Capuano, it seems, would like to
escalate that to armed robbery


---
"If Barack Obama isn't careful, he will become the Jimmy Carter of the 21st
century."
Barb May
2011-02-24 18:26:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ubiquitous
The rhetoric around Wisconsin's government labor dispute is getting
more violent. NHJournal.com reports that Rep. Michael Capuano, a
Massachusetts Democrat, said this yesterday at a Boston "solidarity"
rally: "I'm proud to be here with people who understand that it's
more than just sending an email to get you going. Every once and
awhile you need to get out on the streets and get a little bloody
when necessary."
"Get a little bloody" implies putting yourself in a place where you may
be victimized. It doesn't mean victimizing others.
Post by Ubiquitous
As Michael Barone notes, public-sector unions "are a mechanism by
which every taxpayer is forced to fund the Democratic Party,"
By that logic big corporations owned by right-wingers are a mechanism by
which every consumer is forced to fund the Republican Party.
--
Barb
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